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Donald Rumsfeld

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NEWS
May 9, 2004
Donald Rumsfeld should resign as U.S. secretary of defense. If he lacks the decency and courage to do so, President Bush should fire him. A river of shame washes over America because of the deaths, torture and humiliation of prisoners held by the American military in Iraq and Afghanistan, particularly at the Abu Ghraib prison outside Baghdad. Prosecuting a few grunts who used torture tactics (and were depraved enough to grin while doing it) will not expiate this shame.
NEWS
May 4, 2003 | By Warren P. Strobel and Jessica Guynn INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
When Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld visited Baghdad, State Department officials back in Washington held their breath. Would Rumsfeld meet publicly with Iraqi exile Ahmed Chalabi in Baghdad on Wednesday and silently anoint him the new leader of Iraq, a policy both explicitly banned by the White House and stubbornly pursued by the Pentagon? He didn't, but the fear that he would was a small illustration of how Rumsfeld has injected himself into international affairs more than any Defense secretary in a decade or more.
NEWS
September 6, 2002
Q: In some ways, [al-Qaeda] is a virtual enemy. . . . they have leaders and they have budgets . . . but they don't have a country and they don't have headquarters. . . . Donald Rumsfeld: One thing about the world you described is that it learns every day. It goes to school on you. It watches how you're behaving and then alters and adjusts at relatively little cost, relatively little time, relatively little training. . . . And our changes tend to be slower, costly and visible. Their changes can be cheaper, quicker, and for a period . . . invisible.
NEWS
August 27, 2004
DEATH. Rape. Beatings. And finally the word that truly captures what happen in Abu Ghraib: torture. Those are the descriptions you'll find in the damning 280-page Army report issued this week on the abuses and tortures conducted on Iraqi civilians by U.S. forces. What Donald Rumsfeld and the Pentagon tried to paint as the acts of a few rogue soldiers was so much more. Here's a taste of what happened in January of this year, straight from the Army report: "Soldier 17 witnessed an MP dog handler allowing his black dog to 'go nuts' on two juvenile detainees . . . permitting the dog to get within about a foot of the two juveniles.
NEWS
November 13, 2006 | By Leonard Pitts Jr
Looks like we won't have Donald Rumsfeld to kick around anymore. Ding-dong, the Wicked Witch is dead. Circle the date in red. In announcing his resignation Wednesday, the morning after voters angry over Iraq delivered the GOP an epochal, sea-to-shining-sea beatdown, Rumsfeld - albeit at metaphorical gunpoint - shows us something we have not seen from a political leader in a very long time. It's called accountability. You are forgiven if you don't know the word. Who can blame you?
NEWS
February 2, 2004 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld reached for judges to hear legal appeals of terrorism suspects, he chose a Bucks County senior judge who has been a good friend and sometime neighbor. In the week before he turned 73 on Jan. 5, Edward G. Biester Jr. was among four lawyers whom Rumsfeld selected to form the Pentagon's Military Commission Review Panel. A Rumsfeld spokesman said the panel was intended to hear appeals of military tribunal cases of people suspected of being terrorists or those who harbored them, incarcerated anywhere in the world.
NEWS
May 17, 2004
IT WASN'T LONG after the abuses of Abu Ghraib became known that the calls for Donald Rumsfeld's resignation started in earnest. From the Senate floor to the editorial pages of newspapers across the country, the message was the same: The embattled Secretary of Defense, who essentially claimed ignorance of the casual torture of Iraqi prisoners, had to go. This page didn't join the choir then, essentially for one reason. We knew Rumsfeld wouldn't resign and George Bush wouldn't let him, not in an election year.
NEWS
February 10, 2011 | By WILL BUNCH, bunchw@phillynews.com 215-854-2957
"I N OUR WORLD, narratives and theories get strung out over a period of time until it's like they're chiseled in stone as truth - notwithstanding the fact they are totally based in midair without any roots or substance. " - Former defense secretary Donald Rumsfeld, speaking last night at the National Constitution Center, in Philadelphia. Rumsfeld wasn't talking about the controversial run-up to the Iraq War - when cases for weapons of mass destruction there and terror ties to al Qaeda vanished into that very same ether.
NEWS
November 9, 2004 | By William Safire
The terrorists' Ramadan offensive escalated last weekend, inviting martial law in Iraq and our counterattack to oust the occupiers of Fallujah. A pitched battle where firepower is decisive is a loser for guerrilla fighters. Iraq will then proceed to elections, the United Nation's unhelpful Kofi Annan notwithstanding. Thus the public side of the Bush administration's internal transition - that unnamed 80 days of relief, regeneration and reaching out between reelection and second inauguration - will be overshadowed during what we hope will be climactic fighting.
NEWS
May 12, 2004
Rumsfeld should stay Looking for that "Vietnam moment," you satisfied your itch for turning the country against the war with the May 9 editorial and its huge headline "Donald Rumsfeld must resign, or be fired. " A recent poll showed that most Americans thought Rumsfeld should not resign at this point. It showed Americans are filled with common sense, rather than living in an elite, liberal, antiwar echo chamber. First, we don't know all the facts. Your interest in canning Rumsfeld now seems a bit hasty, to say the least.
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NEWS
February 10, 2011 | By WILL BUNCH, bunchw@phillynews.com 215-854-2957
"I N OUR WORLD, narratives and theories get strung out over a period of time until it's like they're chiseled in stone as truth - notwithstanding the fact they are totally based in midair without any roots or substance. " - Former defense secretary Donald Rumsfeld, speaking last night at the National Constitution Center, in Philadelphia. Rumsfeld wasn't talking about the controversial run-up to the Iraq War - when cases for weapons of mass destruction there and terror ties to al Qaeda vanished into that very same ether.
NEWS
November 13, 2006 | By Leonard Pitts Jr
Looks like we won't have Donald Rumsfeld to kick around anymore. Ding-dong, the Wicked Witch is dead. Circle the date in red. In announcing his resignation Wednesday, the morning after voters angry over Iraq delivered the GOP an epochal, sea-to-shining-sea beatdown, Rumsfeld - albeit at metaphorical gunpoint - shows us something we have not seen from a political leader in a very long time. It's called accountability. You are forgiven if you don't know the word. Who can blame you?
NEWS
November 9, 2006
On Tuesday, Americans clearly used their votes to tell President Bush they are unhappy about the bloodletting and chaos in Iraq. They want a new U.S. strategy. It's hard to imagine any workable new strategy in Iraq that didn't involve getting rid of Donald Rumsfeld as secretary of defense. Yesterday, the president announced a change at the top in the Pentagon. It was a turnaround from his pronouncement last week, brimming with trademark cockiness, that he wanted his co-architects of calamity, Rumsfeld and Vice President Cheney, to serve out his term.
NEWS
October 7, 2006 | By Leonard N. Fleming INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Thomas H. Kean Jr., New Jersey's Republican candidate for U.S. Senate, yesterday became the first major Republican candidate in the nation to call on U.S. Rep. J. Dennis Hastert to resign as House speaker over a congressional sex scandal. Kean, who bucked his party last month in demanding Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld's resignation over the Iraq war, said Hastert, a Republican, should step aside following reports that his office overlooked warnings about then-U.S. Rep. Mark Foley of Florida.
NEWS
November 9, 2004 | By William Safire
The terrorists' Ramadan offensive escalated last weekend, inviting martial law in Iraq and our counterattack to oust the occupiers of Fallujah. A pitched battle where firepower is decisive is a loser for guerrilla fighters. Iraq will then proceed to elections, the United Nation's unhelpful Kofi Annan notwithstanding. Thus the public side of the Bush administration's internal transition - that unnamed 80 days of relief, regeneration and reaching out between reelection and second inauguration - will be overshadowed during what we hope will be climactic fighting.
NEWS
October 10, 2004 | By Hannah Allam and Huda Ahmed INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Followers of the rebel Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr promised yesterday to surrender their weapons in an agreement with the interim Iraqi government to end weeks of fighting and restore security to Baghdad's Sadr City neighborhood before January elections. Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld greeted U.S. Marines at Al Asad Air Base in Iraq's western desert this morning on his first visit to Iraq since its interim government was installed in June. Rumsfeld, whose trip was not announced, planned to give a pep talk and field questions at a meeting with about 1,500 Marines.
NEWS
August 27, 2004
DEATH. Rape. Beatings. And finally the word that truly captures what happen in Abu Ghraib: torture. Those are the descriptions you'll find in the damning 280-page Army report issued this week on the abuses and tortures conducted on Iraqi civilians by U.S. forces. What Donald Rumsfeld and the Pentagon tried to paint as the acts of a few rogue soldiers was so much more. Here's a taste of what happened in January of this year, straight from the Army report: "Soldier 17 witnessed an MP dog handler allowing his black dog to 'go nuts' on two juvenile detainees . . . permitting the dog to get within about a foot of the two juveniles.
NEWS
May 17, 2004
IT WASN'T LONG after the abuses of Abu Ghraib became known that the calls for Donald Rumsfeld's resignation started in earnest. From the Senate floor to the editorial pages of newspapers across the country, the message was the same: The embattled Secretary of Defense, who essentially claimed ignorance of the casual torture of Iraqi prisoners, had to go. This page didn't join the choir then, essentially for one reason. We knew Rumsfeld wouldn't resign and George Bush wouldn't let him, not in an election year.
NEWS
May 17, 2004 | By Charles Krauthammer
Democrats calling for Donald Rumsfeld's resignation invoke the principle of ministerial responsibility: a Cabinet secretary must take ultimate responsibility for what happens on his watch. Interesting idea. Where was it in 1993 when the attorney general of the United States ordered the attack on the Branch Davidian compound in Waco that ended in the death of 76 people? Janet Reno went to Capitol Hill and said, "It was my decision, and I take responsibility. " This was met with approving swoons and applause.
NEWS
May 14, 2004 | By NICOLE WEISENSEE EGAN weisenn@phillynews.com Staff writers Barbara Laker and Simone Weichselbaum and Daily News wire services contributed to this report
THE FATHER of Nick Berg yesterday angrily lashed out at President Bush - and said he had a question for him: "I would like to ask him if it's true that al Qaeda offered to trade my son's life for another person," Michael Berg told a group of reporters outside his West Chester home. "And if that is true, well, I need that information," said Berg, a self-proclaimed peace activist who has marched against the Iraq war. "I think that the people of the United States of America need to know what the fate of their sons and daughters might be in the hands of the Bush administration.
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