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Donkey

NEWS
January 28, 1988 | By Maura C. Ciccarelli, Special to The Inquirer
The donkey basketball game at Hatboro-Horsham High School Saturday night raised more than money for the Hatboro-Horsham Athletic Boosters Association. It also raised the ire of animal-rights activists who picketed the game. Nineteen protesters - men, women, teenagers and a dog named Cinder - braved the cold in a peaceful 1 1/2-hour demonstration outside the school's gymnasium. While school officials looked on, television cameras rolled, people attending the fund-raiser passed by and the protesters walked in a circle, carrying signs that read, "Please respect animals" and "Donkey basketball means cruelty to animals.
NEWS
January 14, 1988 | By Maura C. Ciccarelli, Special to The Inquirer
Sue Schmitt of Horsham was upset when she learned the details of the Hatboro-Horsham High School fund-raising event. Teams of students and teachers riding donkeys in a gymnasium while playing a basketball game sounded cruel, Schmitt said, but no one else seemed to care, and the game went on as scheduled last year. "I heard about the games last year about this time," said Schmitt, a former Hatboro-Horsham High School substitute teacher. "The posters were up in the high school for the games, but it was too late to do anything.
NEWS
March 12, 1987 | By Jane Eisner, Inquirer Staff Writer
It is difficult to say whether the recent headline-grabbing tale of Blackie the donkey stems more from the British obsession with animals in distress or from Fleet Street's obsession with itself. There's ample historical evidence for both. This is, after all, a nation that will rally to even the faintest signal of a bird or mammal in need. A nation that invented the term "animal welfare" and now has refined it to an art. A nation that generously supports such charities as the Mule Society, the National Fancy Rat Society, the British Hedgehog Preservation Society, and the Tortoise Trust.
NEWS
January 7, 1986
It's supposed to be the carrot OR the stick. Isn't it? Hold the carrot in front of the donkey, and the donkey pulls the wagon as it chases the carrot. If the donkey finally wises up and stops chasing, then use the stick to adjust the donkey's attitude. But White House staff and their sub-geniuses at the United States Department of Transportation have come up with a new twist to that old game. It's called carrot AND stick. The difference is important. After five years of unsuccessful attempts to end federal subsidies to urban mass transit, the Reagan administration has come up with a "concept paper" for fiscal year 1987 that would give large urban areas the carrot of fiscal flexibility and then smack them upside the head with significantly reduced money.
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