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Donkey

NEWS
June 16, 1991 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
The 11-year-olds squealed with delight as they watched blindfolded Kristina Dobrikovic stumble forward and place a tail on the painted donkey. She didn't quite find the right spot on the corkboard four-legged beast, but that's part of the fun of the traditional birthday party game. And Pin the Tail on the Donkey is one of several old and new games offered to youngsters at Jelly Beans, a new business devoted to parties. "I had taken my daughter and her friends to (a similar place)
NEWS
February 2, 1989 | By Charlotte Kidd, Special to The Inquirer
A donkey basketball game provided a good time for a lot of students and parents at the Hatboro-Horsham High School Saturday night. But to about 30 animal-rights activists demonstrating outside, the school was promoting cruelty to animals. In the noisy gym, teams of excited teenagers tugged on the donkeys' bridles - pleading with the stubborn animals to cross the basketball court to the opposite hoop. The 35 seniors, rotating in five-member teams, were singlemindedly determined to score.
NEWS
June 13, 1988 | By Jeff Greenfield
It was Vice President Bush's first major post-primary assault on Michael S. Dukakis, and it was a dilly. Appearing at the Texas Republican Convention, the son of Andover, Yale and Kennebunkport, Maine, attacked as an elitist the son of Greek immigrants who brown-bags his lunch and rides the subway. "When I wanted to learn the ways of the world, I didn't go to the Kennedy School, I came to Texas," Bush said. "I didn't go to a symposium on job creation, I started a business. I didn't study a monograph on the effects of economic growth, I met a payroll.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1988 | By Thomas J. Degnan, Special to The Inquirer
On the Horse-Shoe Trail, on a beautiful spring day, two friends and I were hiking several miles west of Valley Forge. Through stands of oaks, through tulip-poplar trees. Into the rolling farmlands of Chester County. Past lovely stone farmhouses, big stone barns. Then we came across the sign. "BEWARE OF THE DONKEY. " We laughed at it, wondered who would put up such a sign. Must be some sort of joke. We continued on the Horse-Shoe Trail - an underused gem of a hiking trail, starting in our back yard in Valley Forge National Park, well-marked, full of lovely views, free of charge, a nature secret of modern-day Philly.
NEWS
February 23, 1988 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Staff Writer
A handful of animal-rights activists huddled in the cold outside the Pennsauken High School gym last night to protest what they said was the exploitation of animals at a donkey basketball game to raise money for the town's veterans memorial. "There are two sides to donkey basketball. It's not all fun and games," Tina Sowicz, director of Trans-Species Unlimited of Philadelphia, told spectators as they streamed into the building. But most appeared to be less interested in the condition of the animals than in the game itself, a contest between town and school district employees.
NEWS
January 28, 1988 | By Maura C. Ciccarelli, Special to The Inquirer
The donkey basketball game at Hatboro-Horsham High School Saturday night raised more than money for the Hatboro-Horsham Athletic Boosters Association. It also raised the ire of animal-rights activists who picketed the game. Nineteen protesters - men, women, teenagers and a dog named Cinder - braved the cold in a peaceful 1 1/2-hour demonstration outside the school's gymnasium. While school officials looked on, television cameras rolled, people attending the fund-raiser passed by and the protesters walked in a circle, carrying signs that read, "Please respect animals" and "Donkey basketball means cruelty to animals.
NEWS
March 12, 1987 | By Jane Eisner, Inquirer Staff Writer
It is difficult to say whether the recent headline-grabbing tale of Blackie the donkey stems more from the British obsession with animals in distress or from Fleet Street's obsession with itself. There's ample historical evidence for both. This is, after all, a nation that will rally to even the faintest signal of a bird or mammal in need. A nation that invented the term "animal welfare" and now has refined it to an art. A nation that generously supports such charities as the Mule Society, the National Fancy Rat Society, the British Hedgehog Preservation Society, and the Tortoise Trust.
NEWS
January 7, 1986
It's supposed to be the carrot OR the stick. Isn't it? Hold the carrot in front of the donkey, and the donkey pulls the wagon as it chases the carrot. If the donkey finally wises up and stops chasing, then use the stick to adjust the donkey's attitude. But White House staff and their sub-geniuses at the United States Department of Transportation have come up with a new twist to that old game. It's called carrot AND stick. The difference is important. After five years of unsuccessful attempts to end federal subsidies to urban mass transit, the Reagan administration has come up with a "concept paper" for fiscal year 1987 that would give large urban areas the carrot of fiscal flexibility and then smack them upside the head with significantly reduced money.
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