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Doomsday

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NEWS
April 22, 1992 | By Tim Weiner, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The soldiers in the doomsday bunker are headed for the day shift. The Pentagon announced yesterday that the Alternate National Military Command Center, a huge post buried inside Raven Rock Mountain near the Pennsylvania-Maryland border, is going off its 24-hour alert and on to "a normal week-day schedule. " The center served throughout the Cold War as a backup Pentagon, where commanders were to gather if Washington were destroyed in a nuclear war. Visitors to the secret post, just off the Appalachian Trail northwest of Camp David, Md., say it is a subterranean city with streets and electric cars, fresh-water reservoirs, tons of freeze-dried food and hundreds of soldiers.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1999 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Though Hollywood has made an obscene pile of money with end-of-the-world scenarios in Deep Impact and Armageddon, the Canadian Last Night proves there's more power when doomsday arrives with a whimper rather than a bang. It's moving rather than maudlin.In this haunting and riveting film, the world will end in six hours for reasons that are wisely left unexplained. In his strong and confident directing debut, Don McKellar, who wrote both The Red Violin and Thirty Two Short Pieces About Glenn Gould, has penned a minimalist and highly effective drama.
NEWS
March 28, 1997 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
California is not the only place to spawn Doomsday cults; Philadelphia has had its share of grim prophets all the way back to the city's birth. Two years after William Penn founded the city, 40 robe-wearing mystics from Germany arrived to meditate and to await the end of the world, which their leader predicted would come in 1694. In the 1780s, prophetess Jimima Wilkinson stirred Philadelphia with predictions of doom and established an all-female sect. Then there were the "Millerites," who in 1844 sold all their earthly possessions, put on "ascension robes" and waited for the end of the world in a soggy field in West Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 1990 | By Bill Bell, New York Daily News
The hero/victim of Kurt Vonnegut's new novel is writing his memoirs in a prison library, on blank pages torn from some of the 800,000 volumes that no one has ever read or is likely to. Is that metaphor or what? The year is 2001. The place is Scipio, in upstate New York. The author is named Eugene Debs Hartke, who is now awaiting trial on the absurd charge that he masterminded a blacks-only prison breakout. But, enough of the plot. Vonnegut tells a story - he always does.
NEWS
November 13, 2011
Jay Rubenstein is a professor of history at the University of Tennessee and the author of Armies of Heaven: The First Crusade and the Quest for Apocalypse On Oct. 21, the world did not end, despite predictions by Christian radio personality Harold Camping. We have by now laughed him off, but perhaps we owe Camping one more serious hearing. I for one can't help but ask: What if the apocalypse had happened? Or if not "the" apocalypse, then at least something fairly apocalyptic? That is what occurred 900 years ago. Thousands of people expected the apocalypse, and they got it, though not the one they were expecting.
NEWS
January 17, 2000 | By Michelle M. Martinez, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Burnell Yow!'s vision of doomsday involves an invasion by an outside force, particularly extraterrestrials. "When I was a kid, I had this theory that aliens were going to come and harvest us," Yow!, 48, of Philadelphia, said yesterday at an exhibit at Salon des Amis gallery here. Yow! molded this theory into a $1,200 multimedia work he calls We Are Delicious, after a poem of sorts that he penned as a teenager. In it, humans are food for aliens. Yow!'s work was one of 42 pieces on display yesterday at the grand opening of the gallery's "Doomsday: Revelations" show, which drew entries from Philadelphia and its suburbs.
NEWS
April 1, 1991
To some, today is a day for bad jokes. But for 10,000 kids being cared for by social service agencies under contract to the city's Department of Human Services, the only foolishness on this April 1 comes from city and state officials. DHS Commissioner Joan M. Reeves wasn't joking, however, when she warned City Council two weeks ago that April 1 was doomsday for the kids in her care. Without money from local or state sources, she warned, 6,281 children in dependent placements, 459 in subsidized adoptions, 774 in delinquent residential placements, 180 in group homes and more than 4,000 receiving in- home services, day care, or day treatment services would be out of luck because her department would be out of money.
NEWS
June 26, 1995 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
It's the Cave of Kelpius, and it's probably the most obscure, hard-to- locate historic site in Philadelphia. Johannes Kelpius is probably the most obscure, elusive figure in local history. So, of course, his cave is hard to find. The man was seeking an isolated place in the wilderness to meditate. Three hundred years ago, Kelpius and his crew were waiting in the hills above Wissahickon Creek for the Second Coming, the end of world. So, it's timely to consider Kelpius and "the Hermits of the Wissahickon" now because every time a new century approaches, a group appears in Philadelphia predicting the apocalypse.
NEWS
May 17, 2011 | By WILLIAM BENDER, benderw@phillynews.com 215-854-5255
HE'S THE Joe Namath of Doomsday hucksters, but the stakes are much higher than Super Bowl III. Harold Camping, the 89-year-old Christian evangelist from Oakland whose Family Radio broadcasts are heard in 61 languages, doesn't think that Judgment Day will come Saturday. He guarantees it. "It is absolutely going to happen," said Camping, who has determined after five decades of studying Scripture that May 21 marks the beginning of the end. "We do not have a Plan B at all. There is no possibility that it will not happen, because all of our information comes from the Bible.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2009 | By Roman Deininger INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Roland Emmerich has an ongoing project: destroying the world. In 1996's Independence Day, the German director sent aliens to wipe out the White House. In 1998, he unleashed Godzilla to wreak havoc on the streets of New York. In 2004's The Day After Tomorrow, he froze the planet in a new ice age. But in his new film, 2012, to be released Nov. 13 and already the eye of a vast promotion storm, things get really bad. Emmerich, who has earned the unofficial title of "Master of Disaster," admits having searched Google for a doomsday scenario even more spectacular than his previous destructions of Earth.
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NEWS
May 30, 2014 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
IN AN unprecedented move, the School Reform Commission opted yesterday not to vote on a proposed "doomsday" budget that would have required more than 1,000 layoffs, significantly increased class sizes, reduced school police and special-education services. Under the city charter, the school district is required to adopt a budget by May 30. Superintendent William Hite said the district needs a clearer answer from city and state lawmakers on the district's request for an additional $216 million before it can come up with a realistic spending plan.
NEWS
September 14, 2013 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA has drafted a doomsday plan to eliminate nine of its 13 rail lines and shorten two others, close a subway line, and convert trolley routes to bus lines if the state doesn't come up with more money for public transit this year. SEPTA general manager Joseph Casey sent the plan to state Transportation Secretary Barry Schoch on Tuesday and laid it out for the state Senate Transportation Committee Thursday. The "service realignment plan" would begin next year and continue slashing service until 2023, when the SEPTA system would be a shadow of its current self.
NEWS
September 13, 2013 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
SEPTA MAY be forced to eliminate service on nine of its 13 rail lines, shorten two other lines, scrap express subway service and convert all trolley routes to bus routes by 2023 without an infusion of funding from the state, the agency's general manager said yesterday as he outlined a doomsday plan. Testifying before the state Senate Transportation Committee in a hearing at Temple University, SEPTA general manager Joe Casey said the plan would begin next year and eventually reduce daily rail ridership by 12 percent.
NEWS
June 1, 2013 | By Martha Woodall and Melissa Chea-Annan, Inquirer Staff Writers
The Philadelphia School District's doomsday scenario moved a step closer to reality Thursday night. Amid angry shouts of "disgrace!", the School Reform Commission approved a $2.4 billion budget that includes cuts that Superintendent William R. Hite Jr. has said would be catastrophic for the city's schools. Joseph A. Dworetzky was the only one of five commissioners to vote against the budget, saying he did not believe that the administration had looked hard enough to find other savings.
NEWS
May 31, 2013 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
THE SCHOOL Reform Commission last night approved a $2.4 billion "doomsday" budget that Superintendent William R. Hite Jr. said "in no way fits my idea of public education. " The austere budget, approved 4-1 by the SRC, has a $304 million shortfall and will eliminate any extras at schools: assistant principals, guidance counselors, secretaries and lunch staff, as well as sports, extracurricular activities and arts and music programs. The district has requested $60 million from the city and $120 million from the state.
NEWS
May 30, 2013
OUR FIRST reaction to the good news that state Sen. Mike Stack is introducing bills in Harrisburg that would remove some of the legal obstacles that the city faces as it tries to collect on delinquent taxes was: How long has this been going on? We knew that the city has a pathetic history of collecting back taxes, but learning that state law has further hobbled the city from going after deadbeats is a rude surprise. The "culture of nonpayment" has been cited by many to explain how our collection performance is the worst of the country's biggest cities.
NEWS
May 29, 2013 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
AS MAY 21, 2011, was approaching, the money was rolling in to get the word out: Judgment Day was close upon us. A suburban Philadelphia group, eBible Fellowship, which had fallen for Christian evangelist Harold Camping's latest doomsday prediction, spent hundreds of thousands of dollars in donations to help fund a global advertising blitz. Billboards, T-shirts, caravans, SEPTA bus wraps, bumper stickers, radio broadcasts, foreign missions. All with the same message: May 21, 2011 would be the end. Camping's biblical math was solid, they said.
NEWS
May 7, 2013 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
If the doomsday budget being floated by the nearly broke Philadelphia School District comes to pass, this is what school will look like in September: "No books, no paper, no clubs, no counselors, no librarian," Masterman teacher Elizabeth Taylor grimly told City Council last week. There would be bigger classes, but no aides to help manage them. Schools would lack sports, support staff to monitor lunchrooms and playgrounds, and secretaries. Some would lose security officers. Thousands of musical instruments would sit unplayed because there would be no music teachers to give lessons.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2013 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
Hello there Kristina and Mark met in May 2012, after a Heretic Foundation show in Anchorage, Alaska. The after-party was at a mutual friend's house. Kristina, who grew up in West Chester and moved to Alaska in 2011 to intern with the National Park Service, asked Mark about his Earth First T-shirt. "I used to live in a redwood tree to keep loggers from cutting it down," said Mark, who is from New Castle, Del. Mark, now 37 and once the head of a commodities brokerage, had moved to Alaska in 2011 to work for a bank.
NEWS
December 10, 2012
The notion that our world will end, vanish - finito! - two Fridays from now is something I take very personally. For, like Thomas Becket, Jane Fonda, and Frank Zappa, I was born on Dec. 21. Therefore, my family reminds me, there's no need for birthday presents. Or dinner reservations. On the plus side, if it's true, I will not age any further. Diet and exercise, moderation and common sense become meaningless. Fiscal cliff? Ha! It's all downhill. Local bonus: Scratch the rest of the Eagles' season.
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