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Doorman

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2006 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jeff is an apartment-house doorman, and he may as well be stuck in the door he spends all night guarding. Maybe his life is getting better because at least he has the ruthlessly boring doorman job, having been ejected from the Navy for smoking weed, then losing lots of money on a stupid bet. But mostly, he's stuck, and too smart and glib for his own good, and coated all over with naivete. Or is he just a down-to-earth, honest guy who respects the truth? Kenneth Lonergan's Lobby Hero, in which Jeff is the prime character, is absorbing in a paragon of a production by the Walnut Street Theatre's Independence Studio.
NEWS
May 2, 2000 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
South Philadelphia nightclub doorman Oscar Young lost his life trying to be a peacemaker on July 11, 1998, a prosecutor said. Young, 52, of 32nd Street near Dickinson, was shot in the face while struggling to keep two men and a woman from pushing past him to resume an argument with a woman patron, said Assistant District Attorney Randolph Williams. The men had been flagged from the bar after the earlier dispute. After a jury heard the case, Kemhya Mickel, 27, of Wharton Street near 17th, was convicted yesterday of third-degree murder and a weapons offense.
NEWS
November 10, 1993 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jasper D. West, 79, of Olney, the cheerful, steady doorman who greeted guests at Old Original Bookbinders with a smile and a helping hand for more than 45 years, died Sunday at Medical College Hospitals' Main Clinical Campus. From 1946 until he retired last November, the tall, slender Mr. West, dressed in a neat, gray uniform with yellow piping, was a familiar figure to diners at 125 Walnut St., opening doors, passing out matches and occasionally mediating disputes between competing cabbies.
NEWS
May 17, 2012 | Monica Yant Kinney
The dapper doorman did not set out to class up the city single-handedly with his blinding-white nylon gloves. But since he has, and since I asked, Leroy Mickens II shares that the key to that gleam is a nightly soak in Dawn detergent, a morning scrub (one gloved hand washing the other), and air drying. "I have eight pairs, so I always have a spare with me if they get dirty," Mickens says between taking requests from guests at the Courtyard by Marriott hotel across from City Hall.
NEWS
April 28, 2009 | By Anthony R. Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It may lack Rockefeller Center, the Empire State Building, and New York City elan, but Conshohocken is about to get a Manhattan staple: a doorman. Next to the scene of the devastating fire that destroyed 189 apartment units on the Schuylkill waterfront in August, work is progressing on what developer J. Brian O'Neill says will be the region's "most luxurious" apartment complex. Although luxurious and Conshohocken have rarely appeared in the same sentence in the town's 159-year history, O'Neill promises that when the building opens by the end of the year, it will have all the candy - from a $5,000-a-month furnished unit to granite countertops to that front-door attendant.
REAL_ESTATE
July 12, 1998 | By Sheila Dyan, FOR THE INQUIRER
David McCurry has a warm, gentle smile on his face as he speaks of his life and work. "I'm a relatively new granddad. I'm retired. I find it's a pleasure to get up each morning. I take that to my job. " Now, there's a guy who'd be nice to come home to each day - and a lot of people do. David McCurry is a doorman at 250 South 17th Street. Until this weekend, he had divided his time between there and the Town House on south 19th. "The doorman is the first person our tenants, prospects and guests meet when entering the building, and we feel his attitude is a reflection on the management," said Stephanie Freedman, Rittenhouse Management Corp.
NEWS
August 28, 1989 | By Robert J. Terry, Inquirer Staff Writer
A doorman at a Fishtown club was charged with murder after he was involved in an altercation early yesterday morning that left another man dead, police said. Thomas Trout, 31, of the 2400 block of Firth Street, in the Fishtown section, died from injuries suffered when he fell down a flight of stairs during a fight with the doorman, Lewis Dunnigan, 36, of the 2500 block of East Somerset Street, also in Fishtown, police said. Dunnigan was awaiting arraignment late yesterday.
NEWS
May 21, 2005 | By Thomas J. Gibbons Jr. INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A city police officer was routinely shifted to administrative duty yesterday after he shot and killed a man late Thursday night. Police said a patron pulled a gun in an Olney bar and leveled it at the officer's brother, who worked there as a doorman. The officer, who was off duty at the time, fired one shot after the gunman refused to drop his pistol inside Nikki's Place, in the 5000 block of North Fifth Street. "It appears at this time that the officer acted in a justifiable fashion," said Police Inspector William Colarulo, who declined to release the officer's name.
BUSINESS
August 17, 1987 | By FREDERICK H. LOWE, Daily News Staff Writer
Normally, when one thinks of a doorman, one thinks of a swank establishment where patrons have to make sure they didn't leave their American Express card at home. The McDonald's restaurant at 726 Market St., where the highest-priced item on menu is less than $5, customers get a taste of luxury. Six days a week, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Reuben Jimenez, dressed in a black and gray hat, gray jacket with tails, and black pants, opens the door for the restaurant's patrons. "He starts early to greet the breakfast customers, then after breakfast he greets people, and those who come into the restaurant late in the afternoon," said Johnny Velez, the general manager.
NEWS
November 11, 2010 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
WHERE IS Lawrence Bernard? Is the mentally ill man OK? Those questions have gnawed at Theodora Landgren since Sept. 25, when she witnessed what she says was the "brutal" treatment that Bernard suffered at the hands of Philly cops. "I saw it from beginning to end - I hope I never see anything like that again," says Landgren, who has filed a complaint with the police Internal Affairs Bureau about the incident. Bernard, 47, a homeless denizen of the Rittenhouse Square area, is "clearly mentally ill - a 2-year-old could see that," says Landgren, 65, who lives in the Rittenhouse Plaza, at 19th and Walnut streets, where she's on the co-op's board of directors.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 17, 2012 | Monica Yant Kinney
The dapper doorman did not set out to class up the city single-handedly with his blinding-white nylon gloves. But since he has, and since I asked, Leroy Mickens II shares that the key to that gleam is a nightly soak in Dawn detergent, a morning scrub (one gloved hand washing the other), and air drying. "I have eight pairs, so I always have a spare with me if they get dirty," Mickens says between taking requests from guests at the Courtyard by Marriott hotel across from City Hall.
NEWS
November 11, 2010 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
WHERE IS Lawrence Bernard? Is the mentally ill man OK? Those questions have gnawed at Theodora Landgren since Sept. 25, when she witnessed what she says was the "brutal" treatment that Bernard suffered at the hands of Philly cops. "I saw it from beginning to end - I hope I never see anything like that again," says Landgren, who has filed a complaint with the police Internal Affairs Bureau about the incident. Bernard, 47, a homeless denizen of the Rittenhouse Square area, is "clearly mentally ill - a 2-year-old could see that," says Landgren, 65, who lives in the Rittenhouse Plaza, at 19th and Walnut streets, where she's on the co-op's board of directors.
NEWS
September 9, 2010
El Conquistador! A brilliant, funny, wildly theatrical show about Latin American soap operas (telenovelas). Thaddeus Phillips (who created this with Tatiana Mallarino and Victor Mallarino), is the only live actor onstage (if you don't count his beloved potted plant). He plays Polonio, a poor Colombian farmer who goes to the glamorous big city and becomes a doorman for an apartment building called Nuevo Mundo. Considering that the show begins in 1492, and then skips ahead 515 years, the whole idea of "New World" is slyly politicized, and further complicated when one of the building's tenants (we see them through the intercom camera each time they call the doorman)
NEWS
April 28, 2009 | By Anthony R. Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It may lack Rockefeller Center, the Empire State Building, and New York City elan, but Conshohocken is about to get a Manhattan staple: a doorman. Next to the scene of the devastating fire that destroyed 189 apartment units on the Schuylkill waterfront in August, work is progressing on what developer J. Brian O'Neill says will be the region's "most luxurious" apartment complex. Although luxurious and Conshohocken have rarely appeared in the same sentence in the town's 159-year history, O'Neill promises that when the building opens by the end of the year, it will have all the candy - from a $5,000-a-month furnished unit to granite countertops to that front-door attendant.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2006 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jeff is an apartment-house doorman, and he may as well be stuck in the door he spends all night guarding. Maybe his life is getting better because at least he has the ruthlessly boring doorman job, having been ejected from the Navy for smoking weed, then losing lots of money on a stupid bet. But mostly, he's stuck, and too smart and glib for his own good, and coated all over with naivete. Or is he just a down-to-earth, honest guy who respects the truth? Kenneth Lonergan's Lobby Hero, in which Jeff is the prime character, is absorbing in a paragon of a production by the Walnut Street Theatre's Independence Studio.
NEWS
October 27, 2005 | By Shannon McCaffrey INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
While an undergraduate at Amherst College, Patrick Fitzgerald spent his summers as a doorman at luxury apartment buildings on Manhattan's Upper East Side. He wasn't always treated well by the elite who lived there, and it made an impression on the future prosecutor. Fitzgerald isn't in awe of the rich and the powerful, friends say. That trait is coming in handy. Fitzgerald's probe into who outed a CIA officer has led him inside the White House. Now, almost two years after he was tapped to lead the investigation, he appears poised to bring indictments, perhaps against some of the most influential players in Washington.
NEWS
May 21, 2005 | By Thomas J. Gibbons Jr. INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A city police officer was routinely shifted to administrative duty yesterday after he shot and killed a man late Thursday night. Police said a patron pulled a gun in an Olney bar and leveled it at the officer's brother, who worked there as a doorman. The officer, who was off duty at the time, fired one shot after the gunman refused to drop his pistol inside Nikki's Place, in the 5000 block of North Fifth Street. "It appears at this time that the officer acted in a justifiable fashion," said Police Inspector William Colarulo, who declined to release the officer's name.
NEWS
July 8, 2003 | By Sylvia Auerbach
Sometimes I'm too smart for my own good. And sometimes I'm too smart and it does me good. This time I was in Manhattan, about 9 p.m. on a rainy night, after visiting my son in the hospital. I got in a cab, told the driver my hotel, and asked, "How will you go?" "Fifty-ninth Street. " "Oh, no you don't. Too many lights and heavy traffic. Take the park. " He started to say something - but I gave him my don't-mess-with-me-Bud look and said, loudly, "The park. " And off we went.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2002 | REGINA MEDINA E!Online and Daily News wire services contributed to this report
WHAT'S WORSE than a stalker? A stalker with money to spend, of course! A Canadian native, accused of sending Camelot survivor Caroline Kennedy Schlossberg letters and packages, some containing threats, was arrested Sunday outside her posh Upper East Side apartment, police said. He was unarmed. Sidney Waite, 39, of Richmond, British Columbia, was charged with stalking, aggravated harassment and harassment, said Sgt. Mary Williams. John-John's big sis wasn't at home when he was arrested.
NEWS
May 2, 2000 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
South Philadelphia nightclub doorman Oscar Young lost his life trying to be a peacemaker on July 11, 1998, a prosecutor said. Young, 52, of 32nd Street near Dickinson, was shot in the face while struggling to keep two men and a woman from pushing past him to resume an argument with a woman patron, said Assistant District Attorney Randolph Williams. The men had been flagged from the bar after the earlier dispute. After a jury heard the case, Kemhya Mickel, 27, of Wharton Street near 17th, was convicted yesterday of third-degree murder and a weapons offense.
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