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Double Agent

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NEWS
November 7, 2012 | Associated Press
MOSCOW - George Blake, a former British spy who doubled as a Soviet agent, has spoken about his career with pride and called himself an "exceptionally lucky man" in an interview published in a Russian government daily Tuesday. Blake, who will turn 90 Sunday and has lived in Russia since his escape from a British prison in 1966, told the daily Rossiyskaya Gazeta that he has spent his "happiest" years in the country. "When I worked in the West I always felt a looming threat of exposure," he is quoted as saying.
NEWS
June 4, 1994 | by Kitty Caparella and Scott Flander, Daily News Staff Writers
Kenneth Withers knew better. The 33-year-old FBI agent had conducted drug investigations his entire seven years in the bureau. Somehow, he thought he could outwit his colleagues, authorities said. But the FBI agents he knew as brothers and sisters on Two Squad treated him just like any other drug suspect. They arrested him yesterday. Withers was accused of trying to sell heroin that he stole from the FBI's evidence room - heroin from the biggest drug bust in city history.
NEWS
March 12, 2000 | By George Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They were the tools of the trade in a gritty, down-and-dirty corporate power struggle between companies controlled by casino-industry giants Stephen A. Wynn and Donald Trump. Weapons in a war of words, lawsuits and executive one-upmanship that the two egocentric millionaires have been waging for more than 15 years. Inventory that even some lawyers involved in the case found unsettling. Consider the implications: Two briefcases, one with a hidden audio tape recorder, the other with a hidden video camera with audio capability.
NEWS
January 24, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
A former member of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police pleaded guilty yesterday to betraying a Canadian double agent to Soviet officials 30 years ago for $2,700. The betrayed double agent, code-named Gideon, was recalled to the Soviet Union and never heard from again, the government charged at the espionage trial of former Mountie James Morrison. Prosecutor Doug Rutherford described Gideon as "the most important counterespionage agent in the Western world up to that time. " Morrison, 69, surprised the court yesterday by interrupting his jury trial to plead guilty to violating the Official Secrets Act. When the trial began Monday, he had pleaded not guilty to the charges.
NEWS
May 10, 2012 | By Kimberly Dozier, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - A decade after hijackers mostly from Saudi Arabia attacked the United States with passenger jets, the Saudis have emerged as the principal ally of the United States against al-Qaeda's spin-off group in Yemen and at least twice have disrupted plots to explode bombs aboard airlines. Details emerging about the latest unraveled plot revealed that a Saudi double agent fooled the terror group al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula, passing himself off as an eager would-be suicide bomber.
NEWS
January 19, 1986 | By Bob August
Maybe you heard what they're saying about Benjamin Franklin. If you haven't, I'm sorry to have to tell you. A scholar has hinted that Franklin might have been a double agent. He doesn't offer proof; he just drops a suggestion, which reverberates like an anvil, and moves on. Is nothing sacred? Benjamin Franklin was not exactly a hero of my youth, like George Washington or John Paul Jones ("I have not yet begun to fight"), but he was like a character out of Dickens, an eccentric but lovable uncle you'd have wanted around.
NEWS
February 22, 2001 | By Lenny Savino INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Why would Robert P. Hanssen spy? For ideology, for money, for revenge, or just for the fun of it? The mystery now isn't over the methods that the FBI said Hanssen used to spy, but what went on in the head of a man who, if guilty, could be the most enigmatic spook to come out of the Cold War. Hanssen, who was arrested Sunday, is accused of selling secrets to Russia over a 15-year period, allegedly passing along thousands of top-secret documents...
NEWS
July 24, 2011 | By Michael Smerconish
Muslim extremists. American heroes. Betrayed confidences. Barren landscapes. It's the stuff of a summer thriller, but sadly, Joby Warrick's spellbinding book The Triple Agent: The al-Qaeda Mole Who Infiltrated the CIA is a work of nonfiction. And in the end, nine individuals - including seven CIA operatives - were killed. Why was a young Jordanian doctor named Humam al-Balawi, who had never been face to face with American intelligence officers, waved through three security checkpoints at the super-secret CIA outpost in Khost, Afghanistan, near the Pakistan border?
NEWS
July 17, 1993 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
SILK STOCKING DISTRICT TO GET A RUN ON TOURISTS Mata Hari, the World War I spy, nude dancer and femme fatale, is getting her own museum in the Dutch town where she was born. The Mata Hari Museum is set to open in Leeuwarden in August 1994 in a townhouse down the street from where the Dutch-Javanese beauty spent her childhood. Mata Hari wooed military officers, allegedly passing on strategic secrets that she extracted during intimate moments to both sides in the war. Nude photos, love letters, stage costumes and jewelry collected by the Mata Hari Foundation will be laid out in a chronological reconstruction of her life.
NEWS
November 11, 1992 | Daily News wire services
WASHINGTON 178,000 SLICED FROM MILITARY The Pentagon cut 178,024 sailors, soldiers, airmen and Marines from active duty in the past budget year - the largest single-year cut in two decades, a spokesman said yesterday. That leaves about 1.8 million men and women still in uniform. Plans call for 160,000 more to be trimmed over the next three fiscal years, said Pentagon spokesman Pete Williams. The previous record year for military cuts was in 1972, when 391,000 men and women in uniform were let go, Williams said.
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NEWS
November 15, 2012 | By Juan Carlos Llorca, Associated Press
EL PASO, Texas - A West Texas lawyer charged with trying to launder $600 million for a Mexican drug cartel was an informant for U.S. Immigrations and Customs Enforcement while he was moving large amounts of cash behind the agency's back, a federal agent testified Wednesday. The testimony from agent Joshua Fry with the Homeland Security Investigations' Financial Operations and Currency United Strike Force came at a hearing in which U.S. District Judge Norbert Garney denied Marco Antonio Delgado's request to be released on bond.
NEWS
November 7, 2012 | Associated Press
MOSCOW - George Blake, a former British spy who doubled as a Soviet agent, has spoken about his career with pride and called himself an "exceptionally lucky man" in an interview published in a Russian government daily Tuesday. Blake, who will turn 90 Sunday and has lived in Russia since his escape from a British prison in 1966, told the daily Rossiyskaya Gazeta that he has spent his "happiest" years in the country. "When I worked in the West I always felt a looming threat of exposure," he is quoted as saying.
NEWS
May 10, 2012 | By Kimberly Dozier, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - A decade after hijackers mostly from Saudi Arabia attacked the United States with passenger jets, the Saudis have emerged as the principal ally of the United States against al-Qaeda's spin-off group in Yemen and at least twice have disrupted plots to explode bombs aboard airlines. Details emerging about the latest unraveled plot revealed that a Saudi double agent fooled the terror group al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula, passing himself off as an eager would-be suicide bomber.
NEWS
July 24, 2011 | By Michael Smerconish
Muslim extremists. American heroes. Betrayed confidences. Barren landscapes. It's the stuff of a summer thriller, but sadly, Joby Warrick's spellbinding book The Triple Agent: The al-Qaeda Mole Who Infiltrated the CIA is a work of nonfiction. And in the end, nine individuals - including seven CIA operatives - were killed. Why was a young Jordanian doctor named Humam al-Balawi, who had never been face to face with American intelligence officers, waved through three security checkpoints at the super-secret CIA outpost in Khost, Afghanistan, near the Pakistan border?
NEWS
January 8, 2010
The average American television viewer sees enough double-crosses on the hit series 24 not to make the mistakes the CIA did in letting a double agent get close enough to bomb a spy base in Afghanistan. Sure, even the fictional Jack Bauer gets taken in now and then, but one would expect the real spies to be more discerning - unless they have become desperate. And unfortunately, desperation seems to be the state of U.S. intelligence-gathering right now. It was bad enough to find out about the mistakes made by the Director of National Intelligence, Department of Homeland Security, FBI, and State Department in inadvertently aiding the foiled attempt by would-be martyr Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab to blow up a jetliner headed to Detroit.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2003 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Moments after bailing out of his B-17 bomber, Roy Allen was standing in the middle of a forest. His plane and his crew were gone, and he had little more than a few francs, a cloth map of France, and a tiny compass. His nylon parachute was still tangled in the trees above him. Remembering his training, Allen set out as quickly as he could to avoid detection. He removed his flight boots and started off into the woods. Little did he know that he had just taken the first steps of a long, perilous journey home from the war. The odyssey of Allen, an Eighth Air Force pilot from Philadelphia who was shot down outside Paris in 1944, hidden by the French Resistance, then apprehended by Nazis, is the subject of a new book, In the Shadows of War, by Thomas Childers, a history professor at the University of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
February 22, 2001 | By Lenny Savino INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Why would Robert P. Hanssen spy? For ideology, for money, for revenge, or just for the fun of it? The mystery now isn't over the methods that the FBI said Hanssen used to spy, but what went on in the head of a man who, if guilty, could be the most enigmatic spook to come out of the Cold War. Hanssen, who was arrested Sunday, is accused of selling secrets to Russia over a 15-year period, allegedly passing along thousands of top-secret documents...
NEWS
March 12, 2000 | By George Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They were the tools of the trade in a gritty, down-and-dirty corporate power struggle between companies controlled by casino-industry giants Stephen A. Wynn and Donald Trump. Weapons in a war of words, lawsuits and executive one-upmanship that the two egocentric millionaires have been waging for more than 15 years. Inventory that even some lawyers involved in the case found unsettling. Consider the implications: Two briefcases, one with a hidden audio tape recorder, the other with a hidden video camera with audio capability.
NEWS
January 9, 1998 | by Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
Citing the critical need to fight the street drug trade in Philadelphia, State Attorney General Michael Fisher said he hopes to double the number of agents working in the local state Bureau of Narcotics Investigations office. Fisher also yesterday proposed to host a statewide conference this fall on crime in the black community. It would take about $2 million to expand the Philadelphia BNI office from 25 agents to 50, Fisher said. He plans to ask the Legislature for the money this spring.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1997 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
At the center of Children of the Revolution, an irreverent satire of leftist politics in Australia and points north, is Joan Fraser, uproariously played by the divine Judy Davis, that snarl of emotions, lips and hair. The more serious Joan gets about her mission as the driving force of Australian Communism, the more hilarious this breakneck comedy, the feature debut of writer/director Peter Duncan. Duncan's naughty implication is that Joan's ideological fervor makes her both a Red and a red-hot mama, catnip to all men, no matter their politics.
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