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Double Feature

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NEWS
May 27, 1988 | By NELS NELSON, Daily News Theater Critic
Ellen Byron and David Kranes are two of the better playwrights flushed out of the hinterlands by Carol Rocamora during the seven seasons that her estimable Philadelphia Festival Theatre for New Plays has favored the boards of the Annenberg Center's Harold Prince Theatre. Byron is remembered with affection for her 1983 "Graceland," a touching one-act play limning the unwitting kinship of two female Elvis Presley fans of different generations; Kranes, for his 1986 play, "Montana," which also dealt sensitively with a young woman and an older woman drawn together in a kind of fortuitous mentorship.
NEWS
May 27, 1988 | By William B. Collins, Inquirer Theater Critic
The hope was that the twin bill of one-act plays that opened last night would redeem a generally disappointing spring season of world premieres mounted by the Philadelphia Festival Theater for New Plays. That hope was not realized. The two works, shown under the title Double Feature, inspired the same mixed feelings as the three full-length plays that preceded them in the series at the Harold Prince Theater of the Annenberg Center. The program consisted of "Election '84," a comedy by Ellen Byron about the strains that national politics can exert on a friendship, and David Kranes' "Paco Latto and the Anchorwoman," the story of a passionate kidnapper and his captive.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 1992 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In a piece of creative blackmail that left the movies forever in his debt, John Huston told Warner Brothers in 1941 that his price for co-writing High Sierra was the chance to direct his first movie. The Maltese Falcon easily ranks as one of the great directing debuts in screen history. It was a movie that entirely redefined the detective genre and raised the themes that were to enrich so many of Huston's pictures. The delightful sleazes, gunsels and gangsters that stalk through Dashiell Hammett's story in search of what turns out to be an empty prize would have felt right at home in Prizzi's Honor, which Huston made almost a half-century later.
NEWS
February 27, 2011 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
You've heard of dinner and a movie. How about together, in a theater? Movie Tavern, a Texas company, won approval last week for a liquor license for its first East Coast location, in the Providence Town Center at Routes 422 and 29 near Collegeville. In June, says marketing director Traci Hoey , movies will play on eight screens (each with 100 to 200 tabletop-equipped seats), and waiters will take orders from patrons. Menu will be comparable to Chili's, though Hoey says grub leans toward non-messy items that can be safely eaten in the dark.
FOOD
November 18, 2010 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1998 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
When Bela Lugosi says "I am - Dracula" in Tod Browning's imperishable horror classic Dracula (1931), it's not so much an announcement as an unassailable declaration of the truth. Before he went down for the Count in the film, Lugosi honed his indelible portrait on the stage in the Broadway play on which the movie is based. Lugosi, a Hungarian emigre, knew little English and he did his lines phonetically, accounting for the eerie, slow delivery that scared the daylights out of audiences in the '30s and still has an icy power today.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 1999 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Mel Brooks' The Twelve Chairs is an underestimated gem of a comedy about the frantic search for a cache of jewels hidden in the upholstery of a dining-room chair. In 1969, Brooks went to Yugoslavia after filming The Producers and shot his second feature around Dubrovnik. The city and its environs stand in very serviceably for Russia in the '20s as Ron Moody, Frank Langella and Dom DeLuise dash for the stash. Neither The Producers nor The Twelve Chairs were big commercial successes for Brooks.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 1998 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
How fitting that one of the best films ever made about a painter happens to be about one of the best painters who ever put brush to canvas. Rembrandt (1936) stars Charles Laughton in a jolly, somber, exuberant and reflective performance that embraces the brilliance and shadow of the Dutch master's canvases. Focusing on the artist's extravagant talents and spending, the loss of his beloved wife Saskia and also his artistic reputation, the film by Alexander Korda lacks the splendor of his prior collaboration with Laughton, The Private Life of Henry VIII.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1997 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The passage of time, which Casablanca's music so memorably celebrates, has only added to the stature of the film and the achievement of its stars. Humphrey Bogart did his part under most unusual circumstances - his third wife, Maryo Methot, a jealous alcoholic, phoned him constantly on the set to accuse him of having an affair with Ingrid Bergman. The accusation wasn't true, but the sparks between Bogie and Bergman on the screen make Methot's suspicions understandable. Incidentally, you can thank Bergman's schedule for the fact that the indelible "As Time Goes By" stayed in the movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 1992 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The Mad Adventures of "Rabbi" Jacob offers a spirited mix of farce, ethnic humor and brickbat satire, and its principal joy is the veteran French comic actor Louis De Funes. In Gerard Oury's 1974 comedy, De Funes plays Victor Pivert. Victor's surname means woodpecker in French, and he is perhaps the most henpecked husband in Paris. He responds by reveling in all sorts of bigotry - mostly a hatred of Jews and foreign drivers. He roars around Paris like a drunk caught up in the Indianapolis 500 until he collides with his comeuppance and is forced, by circumstances too cheerfully silly to explain, to disguise himself as a rabbi.
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NEWS
February 22, 2016 | By Jake Blumgart
Next weekend the International House will show back-to-back films by the French auteur Jean-Luc Godard, which were also filmed back-to-back. The pulpy riff on American noir, Made in U.S.A , was shot in the afternoons, while the discursive collage of Two or Three Things I Know About Her was filmed in the mornings. Both features will pain moviegoers with little tolerance for experimentalism. Godard is one of those filmmakers who snugly fit the stereotypes of art-house cinema, largely because his successors have yet to stop ripping him off. An uncharitable reading would find much of his work, especially by the late 1960s (when both of these were made)
NEWS
June 7, 2012 | By Peter Mucha and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Today's animated Google Doodle -- its ever changing home-page logo -- touts a local milestone: The debut of the drive-in movie theater in Pennsauken 79 years ago today. People paid up to $1 to park their Model A's, Hudsons and Packards to watch "Wives Beware," an English comedy on a huge screen as a loud sound system disturbed the neighbors near Airport Circle, back when it had an airport. Yes, it was a talkie. Not long after drive-ins caught on, clunky wired speakers were provided for each car. The inventor, Richard Hollingshead Jr., may have gotten the idea from his mother, Donna, a large woman who disliked cramped movie theater seats.
NEWS
January 18, 2012 | By Phil Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sometimes, people ask me why I love to cover high school sports so much. Tuesday, I say. Not just any Tuesday. Super Tuesday - Jan. 17. In the span of five hours, I saw two games involving the No. 1, No. 2, and No. 3 teams in The Inquirer's South Jersey rankings - plus another team that was as high as No. 4 recently and looks as if it's coming back with a bullet - decided by last-second shots. Both shots brought students streaming on the court in celebration.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2011 | By Robert Strauss, For The Inquirer
Most Fourth of July ceremonies in Philadelphia rightly celebrate the city's colonial and Revolutionary-era accomplishments. But this year, during the sesquicentennial of the Civil War, our region also is honoring its place in that conflict with pageantry and good old partying. To be sure, the traditional Independence Day celebrations won't be ignored - in fact, they will be as huge as ever in terms of eats, parades, fireworks, and concerts. You won't want to miss fireworks on Monday and the concert by Michael McDonald; Earth, Wind and Fire; Estelle; DJ Jazzy Jeff; Sara Bareilles; a celebration of the 40th anniversary of Philadelphia International Records; and the Roots.
NEWS
February 27, 2011 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
You've heard of dinner and a movie. How about together, in a theater? Movie Tavern, a Texas company, won approval last week for a liquor license for its first East Coast location, in the Providence Town Center at Routes 422 and 29 near Collegeville. In June, says marketing director Traci Hoey , movies will play on eight screens (each with 100 to 200 tabletop-equipped seats), and waiters will take orders from patrons. Menu will be comparable to Chili's, though Hoey says grub leans toward non-messy items that can be safely eaten in the dark.
FOOD
November 18, 2010 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2010
Pop Jazeera Nights: Folk and Pop Sounds of Syria (Sublime Frequencies . 1/2) Casual "world music" fans beware: Charismatic Syrian vocalist Omar Souleyman doesn't trade in pleasantly vague foreign background music. He peddles authentic, semi-lo-fi Arab street-pop and arrestingly exotic/electronic dance-jams, suitable for weddings, parties, etc. Unknown to the West no more, his third domestic collection on outstanding international label Sublime Frequencies again features SF compiler Mark Gergis' helpful liner notes.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2009 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Pen?lope Cruz will tell you she is not from another world. Don't believe her. Winner of an Oscar in the spring for her ball-of-fire performance as a bisexual, bipolar artist in Woody Allen's Vicky Cristina Barcelona, Cruz says that Audrey Hepburn and Marilyn Monroe - they were the creatures from beyond Earth's sphere. "They had the talent and the magic and that beauty," says Cruz, who has a double feature - Pedro Almod?var's Broken Embraces and the glitzy musical Nine - opening on Christmas Day. "They were like Martians, the two of them, they were like from another world.
NEWS
October 22, 2009 | By Melissa Dribben INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When the TLA video store at 517 S. Fourth St. closed this week, it came as a shock but no surprise. For 24 years, the absurdly well-stocked shelves had offered films to professors and parents, little kids and teenage punks, couples seeking romantic inspiration and retirees nostalgic for a night with Wallace Beery. Over time, the South Street neighborhood changed. Young professionals, many with babies in strollers, moved into working-class Queen Village and Bella Vista. The commercial strip morphed from a hippie haven to a high school hangout and, lately, a mosh pit of young toughs and New Jersey singles.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2007 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The National Association of Theatre Owners would beg to differ, but it's still possible in a few multiplexes across the land to "enjoy" the grindhouse experience. You know, a theater with floors glazed in Coke and rotten Raisinets, upholstered seats you don't want to see with the lights up, a couple of drunks down in front providing running commentary, and maybe a guy in military camouflage with a bulging duffel bag, grunting to himself one aisle over. "Admittedly, that was never the best part of it," says director Quentin Tarantino, waxing nostalgic about the days decades back when he'd venture into some grungy one-screen in downtown L.A. to see a cheapo vigilante flick or a babes-behind-bars thriller.
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