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Douglas Macarthur

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NEWS
January 8, 2012
1. b. Douglas MacArthur. 2. d. Estes Kefauver, who received 55 percent vs. Truman's 44 percent. 3. False, both won in landslides. 4. c. Henry Cabot Lodge Jr. 5. a. Richard Nixon. 6. False, Johnson beat McCarthy, 49 percent to 41 percent. 7. b. Edmund Muskie. 8. Jerry Brown. 9. False. George H.W. Bush won in 1988 and '92; George W. Bush lost in 2000 to John McCain, but won in 2004. 10. b. Hillary Rodham Clinton.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 1986 | By KAY GARDELLA, New York Daily News
"I had to do it. I had to figure out a way to close the story on Patton," said George C. Scott. "His death was so incredibly tragic. " Sporting a full beard, which he doesn't have in CBS' Sept. 14 film "The Last Days of Patton," based on Ladislas Farago's book, Scott sat in a Manhattan eatery and talked about the importance of this project to him and what the famous World War II Army leader, Gen. George S. Patton, meant to him personally. "It took me 3 1/2 years to get this film off the ground," Scott recalled.
NEWS
March 8, 2013 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
TOMMY LEE Jones, a recent Oscar nominee as fire-breathing abolitionist Thaddeus Stevens, in "Lincoln," returns to historical drama in "Emperor. " He breathes no fire, but he does smoke a pipe as legendary WWII general Douglas MacArthur, in charge of the occupying American army in post-war Japan. This sounds like it should be great fun, for Jones fans and for WWII junkies, but there is really none to be had in the tepid "Emperor. " In fact, I think it's fair to say that Jones gives a better performance in in his Ameriprise financial commercials.
NEWS
January 8, 2012
In preparation for Tuesday's New Hampshire primary, a look at previous early presidential contestants. 1. In 1952, when Dwight Eisenhower won New Hampshire with 50 percent of the vote, back in the pack was another World War II hero, with 3 percent. a. Omar Bradley. b. Douglas MacArthur. c. George S. Patton. d. George C. Marshall. 2. President Harry S. Truman actually lost in 1952 to this man. a. Adlai E. Stevenson.
NEWS
October 20, 1992 | BY CHUCK STONE
If as Antonio warned Bassanto, "the Devil can cite Scripture for his purpose," then I guess there's no reason why political mediocrities can't compare their puny records to those of distinguished statesmen. But oh, Harry Truman, what sins are committed in thy name. The odious comparisons refuse to expire. George Bush and Bill Clinton remind me of that old "Saturday Night Live" skit when Gen. Franco, who for weeks had been expected to die any day, finally passed away. Every week, a "SNL" news brief would declare, "The latest report is that Gen. Franco is still dead.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2013 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Postwar Japan. Tokyo in ruins. U.S. soldiers arriving to take charge. "Let's show them some good old-fashioned American swagger," barks Douglas MacArthur, the five-star general in command of rebuilding the nation he has just destroyed, as he and his officers make their way from the air base to their new HQ. Tommy Lee Jones, in baggy Army browns, puffing on an extra-long corncob pipe, does his best to approximate the storied military man. ...
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1997 | By Robert Strauss, FOR THE INQUIRER
The legend of Harry Truman has gone through more rehabilitations and revisions than the U.S. Tax Code, except that, unlike taxes, everyone seems to want to make Truman extremely likable. You'll find very few discouraging words over the 4 1/2 hours of Truman: An Accident of Democracy (Sunday and Monday at 8 p.m. on Channel 12), the start of the 10th season of The American Experience. Though he was president for more than seven years - between 1945 and 1953 - Truman was never thought in his lifetime to be anywhere near the equal of his predecessor, Franklin D. Roosevelt, or his successor, Dwight Eisenhower.
NEWS
September 23, 1990 | By Marc Schogol, Inquirer Staff Writer
Item one: Last week it was announced that the U.S. trade deficit with Japan in July was nearly $3 billion. Item two: A couple of weeks before that Treasury Secretary Nicholas F. Brady was in Japan, hat in hand, asking for money to help pay for U.S. military operations in the Persian Gulf. And item three: Earlier this month came word that a Japanese company had bought the famed Pebble Beach Golf Links in California. Add together those items and it is entirely possible to wonder, not for the first time or the last, how this little island nation, slightly smaller than the state of California, has come to economically overshadow the mighty United States of America?
NEWS
August 15, 1992 | By TAYLOR GRANT
It is 1992. I am watching a TV sitcom, where an actor playing the part of a U.S. senator dissuades his wife from urging him to run for president. He thinks he's an OK senator but his talents are too limited. Shooting for the presidency, he says, would be too tough. His wife responds, "Oh, come on! Look around! How tough could it be?" Or words to that effect. If the quote isn't exactly right, it's because this was a few months ago, and I'm at an age when what happened recently is never recalled so easily as what happened say 44 years ago, when the number of candidates considered capable did not provoke such derision.
NEWS
June 13, 1993 | By Christopher Durso, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Thomas G. Kerr's personal memories of his grandfather are of someone, well, pretty grandfatherly. He was only 8 years old, after all, when his grandfather died. But Kerr, now an assistant superintendent in the Marple Newtown School District, has learned all about the man and his mission. His grandfather, you see, William T. "Bill" Kerr, of Yeadon, was a driving force behind Flag Day, the holiday - observed tomorrow - that commemorates the nation's 13-striped, 50-starred banner.
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NEWS
March 8, 2013 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
TOMMY LEE Jones, a recent Oscar nominee as fire-breathing abolitionist Thaddeus Stevens, in "Lincoln," returns to historical drama in "Emperor. " He breathes no fire, but he does smoke a pipe as legendary WWII general Douglas MacArthur, in charge of the occupying American army in post-war Japan. This sounds like it should be great fun, for Jones fans and for WWII junkies, but there is really none to be had in the tepid "Emperor. " In fact, I think it's fair to say that Jones gives a better performance in in his Ameriprise financial commercials.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2013 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Postwar Japan. Tokyo in ruins. U.S. soldiers arriving to take charge. "Let's show them some good old-fashioned American swagger," barks Douglas MacArthur, the five-star general in command of rebuilding the nation he has just destroyed, as he and his officers make their way from the air base to their new HQ. Tommy Lee Jones, in baggy Army browns, puffing on an extra-long corncob pipe, does his best to approximate the storied military man. ...
NEWS
January 8, 2012
1. b. Douglas MacArthur. 2. d. Estes Kefauver, who received 55 percent vs. Truman's 44 percent. 3. False, both won in landslides. 4. c. Henry Cabot Lodge Jr. 5. a. Richard Nixon. 6. False, Johnson beat McCarthy, 49 percent to 41 percent. 7. b. Edmund Muskie. 8. Jerry Brown. 9. False. George H.W. Bush won in 1988 and '92; George W. Bush lost in 2000 to John McCain, but won in 2004. 10. b. Hillary Rodham Clinton.
NEWS
January 8, 2012
In preparation for Tuesday's New Hampshire primary, a look at previous early presidential contestants. 1. In 1952, when Dwight Eisenhower won New Hampshire with 50 percent of the vote, back in the pack was another World War II hero, with 3 percent. a. Omar Bradley. b. Douglas MacArthur. c. George S. Patton. d. George C. Marshall. 2. President Harry S. Truman actually lost in 1952 to this man. a. Adlai E. Stevenson.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1997 | By Robert Strauss, FOR THE INQUIRER
The legend of Harry Truman has gone through more rehabilitations and revisions than the U.S. Tax Code, except that, unlike taxes, everyone seems to want to make Truman extremely likable. You'll find very few discouraging words over the 4 1/2 hours of Truman: An Accident of Democracy (Sunday and Monday at 8 p.m. on Channel 12), the start of the 10th season of The American Experience. Though he was president for more than seven years - between 1945 and 1953 - Truman was never thought in his lifetime to be anywhere near the equal of his predecessor, Franklin D. Roosevelt, or his successor, Dwight Eisenhower.
NEWS
October 20, 1994 | By Tom Infield, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As he stood on the deck of the cruiser USS Nashville, waiting to set foot again in the Philippines, Gen. Douglas A. MacArthur must have thought back to that humiliating day 31 months earlier when he had sneaked away from the islands on a torpedo boat, leaving behind his 12,000 men to be killed or captured by advancing Japanese forces. There had been whispers that MacArthur was chicken. Nothing could be farther from the truth. This was the same man who had charged into machine-gun fire in World War I, who twice had been recommended for the Medal of Honor.
NEWS
June 13, 1993 | By Christopher Durso, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Thomas G. Kerr's personal memories of his grandfather are of someone, well, pretty grandfatherly. He was only 8 years old, after all, when his grandfather died. But Kerr, now an assistant superintendent in the Marple Newtown School District, has learned all about the man and his mission. His grandfather, you see, William T. "Bill" Kerr, of Yeadon, was a driving force behind Flag Day, the holiday - observed tomorrow - that commemorates the nation's 13-striped, 50-starred banner.
NEWS
October 20, 1992 | BY CHUCK STONE
If as Antonio warned Bassanto, "the Devil can cite Scripture for his purpose," then I guess there's no reason why political mediocrities can't compare their puny records to those of distinguished statesmen. But oh, Harry Truman, what sins are committed in thy name. The odious comparisons refuse to expire. George Bush and Bill Clinton remind me of that old "Saturday Night Live" skit when Gen. Franco, who for weeks had been expected to die any day, finally passed away. Every week, a "SNL" news brief would declare, "The latest report is that Gen. Franco is still dead.
NEWS
August 15, 1992 | By TAYLOR GRANT
It is 1992. I am watching a TV sitcom, where an actor playing the part of a U.S. senator dissuades his wife from urging him to run for president. He thinks he's an OK senator but his talents are too limited. Shooting for the presidency, he says, would be too tough. His wife responds, "Oh, come on! Look around! How tough could it be?" Or words to that effect. If the quote isn't exactly right, it's because this was a few months ago, and I'm at an age when what happened recently is never recalled so easily as what happened say 44 years ago, when the number of candidates considered capable did not provoke such derision.
NEWS
September 23, 1990 | By Marc Schogol, Inquirer Staff Writer
Item one: Last week it was announced that the U.S. trade deficit with Japan in July was nearly $3 billion. Item two: A couple of weeks before that Treasury Secretary Nicholas F. Brady was in Japan, hat in hand, asking for money to help pay for U.S. military operations in the Persian Gulf. And item three: Earlier this month came word that a Japanese company had bought the famed Pebble Beach Golf Links in California. Add together those items and it is entirely possible to wonder, not for the first time or the last, how this little island nation, slightly smaller than the state of California, has come to economically overshadow the mighty United States of America?
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