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Douglass Township

NEWS
January 28, 1993 | By S.E. Siebert, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Borough Council is considering entering the trash business. But some residents would just as soon it didn't. During a meeting Tuesday, council members wrangled over hiring a private hauler to collect refuse from all 1,200 borough households and reviewed a study on the issue. Under the current system, trash collection is private. Homeowners make their own arrangements with area haulers. The study done by a King of Prussia consulting firm suggested that the borough adopt a weekly pay-per-bag collection system, in which a hauler collects the trash in special bags the borough sells to residents.
NEWS
June 11, 1997 | By Natalie Kostelni, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Preliminary investigation of Monday's fatal crash of a single-engine ultralight aircraft has revealed a few abnormalities in the plane's operation, officials said yesterday. According to standard procedure, only one person is supposed to operate an ultralight, and in this case two people were seated in the aircraft, said an Federal Aviation Administration spokeswoman in New York. The only reason two people would be in an ultralight would be for instruction, which did not appear to apply in this case, the FAA spokeswoman said.
NEWS
November 17, 2000 | By Erin Carroll, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
To keep builders at bay, the Montgomery County commissioners voted yesterday to spend $1.2 million to ensure that 414 acres of farmland in the northwestern section of the county stays farmland forever. The county money, along with $2.8 million in state funding, does not buy the farmland itself, but rather the development rights to the land. Farmers who voluntarily apply "agree never to allow development on their farmland; they keep it in farming, in perpetuity, forever," said Elizabeth Emlen, the county's farmland-preservation administrator.
NEWS
September 16, 1996 | By John Murphy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
If things had gone differently, a man who police say pilfered saw blades from a hardware store might be facing shoplifting charges. Instead, Robert James Streisel was arraigned at his hospital bedside late last week on charges of second-degree murder. If convicted, the 40-year-old Schuylkill County man could face a mandatory sentence of life in prison. Streisel, of Mahanoy City, is accused of striking a 71-year-old driver Sept. 6 during a high-speed chase along Route 100 in Douglass Township, western Montgomery County.
NEWS
July 2, 1997 | By Bill Bell Jr., INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The citizens sat like guests crowded into pews at a summertime wedding, the bridegroom's side in favor of the Pottstown Landfill's expansion and the bride's side largely against it. In front of the acrimonious congregation of 100, with more spilling out into the foyer, the West Pottsgrove commissioners voted, 3-2, Monday night to approve a zoning change needed for a proposed 73.4-acre expansion of the landfill, which will be between Sell and...
NEWS
July 5, 2011 | By Jeremy Roebuckand Larry King, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Mark Geisenheyner spent most of the last 22 years landing himself behind bars or pleading with the state parole board to let him out again. Paul Shay - a social activist and owner of a New York City plumbing business - looked kindly upon men whom others had written off as lost causes. How exactly the two men met - one a career criminal, the other a self-described sucker for second chances - remains unclear. But the extent of their relationship may hold the answers to explaining one of the most bizarre murder cases Montgomery County prosecutors have seen in years.
NEWS
October 23, 1994 | By Michelle Conlin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In the mid-1980s, a tiny, working-class town in Montgomery County made a pact with a billion-dollar garbage behemoth. In exchange for allowing Waste Management Inc., the nation's biggest trash firm, to turn West Pottsgrove's dump into a major landfill, the company agreed to pick up the township's trash for free and to give the township enough money to wipe out the need for local property taxes - as long as the dumping continued. West Pottsgrove had been dependent on smokestack industries, which were long gone.
NEWS
August 10, 1997 | By Bill Bell Jr., INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
There is a plastic bag over the fire hydrant that serves Judi Krause's $200,000, two-Honda home in the Twin Ponds development. It's there because the water company says there's not enough water available to put out a fire. Her neighbor Marsha Kincaid couldn't flush the pesticides she accidentally sprayed in her eyes in the spring while tending her roses. She rushed to her faucet, but there was no water. "You are supposed to get it off immediately," Kincaid said. "I don't know what that did to me. " Fortified by a litany of similar stories, Krause and Kincaid's neighbor Charlene Wysocki filed a formal complaint about the lack of water April 30 with the Public Utility Commission against Superior Water Co., their water supplier.
NEWS
July 6, 2011 | By Jeremy Roebuck and Larry King, Inquirer Staff Writers
Mark Geisenheyner spent most of the last 22 years landing himself behind bars or pleading with the state parole board to let him out again. Paul Shay - a social activist and owner of a New York City plumbing business - looked kindly upon men whom others had written off as lost causes. How exactly the two men met - one a career criminal, the other a self-described sucker for second chances - remains unclear. But the extent of their relationship may hold the answers to explaining one of the most bizarre murder cases Montgomery County prosecutors have seen in years.
NEWS
September 1, 1999 | By Kate Campbell, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Two days after her estranged husband chased her into the back room of the Wal-Mart store where she worked and shot her in the head, Marsha Midgette, 45, remained in critical condition yesterday at Hahnemann University Hospital. Hahnemann representatives declined to discuss her chances for survival. Her husband, Brian "Buddy" William Midgette, shot himself in the head and died at the scene. Douglass Township police said Buddy Midgette, 47, had been arrested Thursday for shoving his wife off a bar stool on their patio in Gilbertsville.
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