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Downey

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FOOD
March 3, 1996 | By Elaine Tait, INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
It's time someone whispered to Downey's that fake flowers planted in a dining-room divider look - there's no other word for it - chintzy. And that restaurant diners in this day and age might expect to find freshly cooked tuna, not supermarket canned stuff, in an upscale restaurant's $12.95 Mediterranean salad. A tactful critic might also quietly remind the kitchen here that foil-wrapped potatoes went out with the '60s. And that there's a whole world of salad dressings beyond blue cheese, honey mustard and Thousand Island.
FOOD
April 10, 1988 | By Elaine Tait, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
When a restaurant is successful year after year, it must be doing a lot of somethings right. But at Downey's, you don't find out what those somethings are without paying the price for the popularity. Twice, months apart, I arrived at the Front Street drinking house and dining saloon and was told there would be a lengthy wait for dinner. Twice I said "no thanks," turned on my heel and left. Then I got smart. By arriving at the unfashionably early hour of 5:45 p.m. on a recent weekday evening, a review partner and I got not only the table we wanted - in the windowed South Street portion of the restaurant - but also the 25-percent discount that Downey's gives to those who get there before 6 p.m. But even prime-time prices are appealing here, because they bring some of the biggest portions in town.
NEWS
July 21, 1989 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer TV Critic
The announcement Wednesday of the cancellation of The Morton Downey Jr. Show - for our French readers, la mort de Mort - probably doesn't signal the demise of trash TV. Where there's junk, there's Geraldo Rivera, after all. However, it does mark a small but significant turning point in late-'80s television. Two years ago, Downey came out of radio, flashing his gleaming white choppers. He created a sensation by realizing that the time was right to revive the ultra-aggressive talk-show style pioneered by leather-lungs such as Joe Pyne and Alan Burke.
NEWS
August 11, 2005 | By Keith Herbert and Larry King INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
By David F. Downey's account, he is an innocent who did nothing wrong and feels "awful" about the death of a teenager he hired from a Philadelphia escort service. The Montgomery County businessman entangled in the investigation into the death of 17-year-old Ashley Burg said that he thought the girl was 22 years old and that he never had sex with her. Burg's body, clothed only in underwear, was found Aug. 1 along Old Red Lion Road in Northeast Philadelphia. The cause of her death has not been determined, though a preliminary drug screening found the presence of cocaine in her body.
NEWS
June 3, 1991
The great uproar on South Street over the renovation of Downey's enclosed "sidewalk cafe" just goes to show that one man's palace can be another's encroachment. It's true that the well-known pub pretty much annexed part of the sidewalk around its corner building. But it made that incursion years ago - with City Council approval no less - so the Board of Licenses and Inspections Review was right in rejecting the neighbors' belated petition to tear the handsome new structure down.
NEWS
September 1, 1988 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer TV Critic
These are supposed to be the dog days of television, aren't they? Between the writers' strike and the usual amount of summer reruns, the Vast Wasteland should be even more arid than usual, isn't that so? Well, it's mostly true, unless your idea of a good night of television is a rerun of Full House followed by the sixth time around for a few of those Moonlighting shows. (All right, I want to see hands: Which of you used to think that series was actually witty?) But tonight, there is such a clear exception to the current rule that attention must be paid.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 1988 | By Dave Bittan, Daily News Staff Writer
Radio talk show fans expecting fireworks on Alan Burke's debut yesterday on WCAU (AM/1210) were greeted instead with a fizzle. After Morton Downey Jr., the venomous TV talk jockey, backed out of a phone gabfest with Burke - a veteran who Downey considers to be his mentor - listeners were stuck on the 9 a.m.-noon call-in show with a nearly three-hour- long boring discussion between Burke, guests and callers on the pros and cons of Pennsylvania's state...
NEWS
March 21, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Matilda DeFlaviis Fumo could often be seen in the Independence Hall neighborhood, turned out as a well-dressed 18th century lady. In springtime and autumn, from the mid-1980s into 2009, Mrs. Fumo was a costumed guide for Centipede Tours. A very patient guide. The last tour that Mrs. Fumo worked alongside Centipede guide Sally A. Downey was especially memorable. Though the tour groups often consisted of local schoolchildren, this one was peopled by adults from out of state.
NEWS
January 2, 2013 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
For sufferers of the nation's most popular superstition, the arrival of 2013 opens the door to an annum of angst. Triskaidekaphobia - the fear of 13 - is a dread so common that some buildings don't label their 13th floors, some workers fall "sick" every Friday the 13th, and some passengers reschedule a flight if their only choice is a seat in the 13th row. For Margaret Downey of Pocopson, Chester County, a self-styled "treatment nurse" with...
NEWS
September 28, 1989 | By Rose Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Bristol Borough woman and her racially mixed children, who were forced out of a rental house in the town's predominantly white Harriman neighborhood, has sued the homeowner and her rental agent for violating the family's civil rights. In a federal lawsuit filed in July and amended Friday, Beatrice Pollard contends that Charlotte Jennings and W. Randy Esposito, a real estate agent, conspired to evict her family from a house in the 200 block of Roosevelt Street after it was learned that her two children and a granddaughter were racially mixed.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 21, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Matilda DeFlaviis Fumo could often be seen in the Independence Hall neighborhood, turned out as a well-dressed 18th century lady. In springtime and autumn, from the mid-1980s into 2009, Mrs. Fumo was a costumed guide for Centipede Tours. A very patient guide. The last tour that Mrs. Fumo worked alongside Centipede guide Sally A. Downey was especially memorable. Though the tour groups often consisted of local schoolchildren, this one was peopled by adults from out of state.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2014 | BY HOWARD GENSLER, Daily News Staff Writer gensleh@phillynews.com, 215-854-5678
TORONTO - Before Robert Downey Jr. was Iron Man, his being Iron Man would have been inconceivable. Before "Iron Man" in 2008, Downey had been acting in movies for 25 years and had never top-lined a major hit. His biggest box-office movie was "Back to School," starring Rodney Dangerfield. His second biggest hit: "Bowfinger," starring Steve Martin and Eddie Murphy. No. 3? "The Shaggy Dog," starring Tim Allen. Downey had always been an actor of great range and promise, but he was best-known for his drug habit, and he was hardly a movie star.
NEWS
February 28, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
ACTRESS/producer Roma Downey decided to call her movie company Lightworkers for a reason. "We were tired of cursing the darkness," said Downey, the former "Touched by an Angel" star who produced last year's hit miniseries "The Bible" and this week opens a companion film, "Son of God. " "We're committed to stories that add light," she said. "We are people of faith. This is important to us. It's not just a job. " "We have jobs," chimed in husband Mark Burnett, with atypical understatement.
NEWS
May 3, 2013 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
"IRON MAN 3" is good fun, and the story of how the franchise got its groove back is one of those strange only-in-Hollywood tales. Cut to 2004, when fallen star Robert Downey Jr. was trying to mount a movie comeback after rehab and exile - a history of arrests and relapse had made him uninsurable and nearly unemployable. Producers withheld salary until wrap day; friends paid his insurance bond. He was offered the lead in an offbeat mystery-comedy called "Kiss Kiss Bang Bang" and took it, and while the movie didn't make much money, it reaffirmed Downey's chops - his speed-bag way with dialogue, his gift for blink-of-an-eye shifts from comedy to drama.
NEWS
May 3, 2013 | BY DAVID GERMAIN, Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - There's something of the old married couple about Gwyneth Paltrow and Robert Downey Jr., though they're married to other people. They've known each other for 20 years, through bad times (his) and good (hers all along, and now his, too). They're cozy and comfy sitting down together for an interview, shifting easily between talking about their Marvel Studios superhero sequel "Iron Man 3," chatting up each other's career and family, and trading small talk about their little ailments as Downey rummages through a case of nostrums he travels with.
NEWS
February 28, 2013 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
James E. Downey Sr., 84, of Springfield, Delaware County, a banking executive who devoted himself to Catholic organizations, died Saturday, Feb. 23, of respiratory failure at Bryn Mawr Terrace. Mr. Downey began working for Beneficial Mutual Savings Bank in 1949 as a bookkeeper. He later moved to the company's audit department. When he retired in 1993, he was senior vice president and treasurer. He was instrumental in expanding the branch network and increasing the bank's assets.
NEWS
January 2, 2013 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
For sufferers of the nation's most popular superstition, the arrival of 2013 opens the door to an annum of angst. Triskaidekaphobia - the fear of 13 - is a dread so common that some buildings don't label their 13th floors, some workers fall "sick" every Friday the 13th, and some passengers reschedule a flight if their only choice is a seat in the 13th row. For Margaret Downey of Pocopson, Chester County, a self-styled "treatment nurse" with...
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2011 | By Michael Janairo and Tracy Ormsbee, ALBANY TIMES UNION
Recent movie openings bring with them a duel between Tom Cruise in the punctuationally exciting sequel Mission: Impossible - Ghost Protocol and Robert Downey Jr. in his second sequel in as many years, Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows. At a glance, the two actors couldn't be more different. There's Cruise, with his clean-cut boy-next-door, Jerry Maguire good looks and box-office popularity, which remains undimmed by some of his weird antics and belief in Scientology.
NEWS
July 25, 2011 | BY JAN RANSOM, ransomj@phillynews.com 215-854-5218
IT WASN'T EASY for Spike TV's "Bar Rescue" to whip tax deadbeat Downey's Irish Pub and Restaurant, at Front and South streets, back into shape. In the series' premiere, which aired last night, consultant Jon Taffer grills owner Domenico Centofanti about unsanitary conditions that include rat carcasses that decomposed for weeks above a pizza oven, and food that was left just a few feet away from an overflowing trash room. Three things we learned from the show: 1 Centofanti admitted he became depressed after his brother Marco Centofanti shot their mother and killed himself in a third-floor apartment above the bar on Mother's Day 2005.
NEWS
July 14, 2011
Thirty patrons have posted comments on Yelp.com about their experiences at Downey's, giving the pub a measly 2 1/2 stars. Here's a list of some comments made before the makeover: James B., of Philadelphia: "I really can't fathom the 1 star reviews here and can only assume they are extremely outdated opinions. Downey's is a totally fun place that really stands out from many of the crowded Irish bars in the same area that are full of half-wits, loudmouths and generally drunken a-holes.
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