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Dracula

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1986 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
The stake that was driven through Dracula's heart at the end of the Bram Stoker novel that introduced the vampire to the world did not do a very good job of killing the fanged fellow, and it certainly hasn't kept him in his coffin. He keeps being brought back in films and on stage for yet another swoop. The latest vehicle for transporting Dracula back from the undead is a stage piece called Others, which the theater group Bricolage performed last night at the Painted Bride Art Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1998 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
When Bela Lugosi says "I am - Dracula" in Tod Browning's imperishable horror classic Dracula (1931), it's not so much an announcement as an unassailable declaration of the truth. Before he went down for the Count in the film, Lugosi honed his indelible portrait on the stage in the Broadway play on which the movie is based. Lugosi, a Hungarian emigre, knew little English and he did his lines phonetically, accounting for the eerie, slow delivery that scared the daylights out of audiences in the '30s and still has an icy power today.
NEWS
August 27, 1989 | By Nancy Reuter, Special to The Inquirer
Area residents who would like a chance in the spotlight are invited to audition for parts in the thriller, Dracula, to be performed by the Haddonfield Plays and Players in late October through early November. The auditions will be held tonight and tomorrow night at 7:30 in the Performing Arts Center, 957 S. Atlantic Ave., Haddonfield. Dracula, also called The Vampire Play, is a show based on the Bram Stoker novel, said Alan Rosen, who directs and also does public relations for Haddonfield Plays and Players.
NEWS
October 25, 2013 | By Ellen Gray
* DRACULA. 10 tonight, NBC10. * SPRINGSTEEN AND I. 9 tonight, Showtime.   NBC SETS the wayback machine for Victorian London tonight in "Dracula," a lavish-ish new costume drama with a cold, dead heart at its center. That would be Vlad/Dracula himself, who, in his latest incarnation, is played by Jonathan Rhys Meyers ("The Tudors") in one of the dullest outings yet for both character and actor. I blow hot and cold on vampires, getting perhaps a bit too excited a few weeks ago to receive a review DVD set of "Kindred: The Embraced" - which lasted just eight episodes in 1996 - but rolling my eyes through "Twilight," longing for a sequel in which "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" slapped some sense into Bella.
NEWS
June 17, 2008 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If anyone can get you - yet again - to sink your teeth into Dracula, it's actor Christopher Patrick Mullen. This is no simple task: On stage, the vampire story, like Dracula himself, stubbornly refuses to die despite several versions that (also like Dracula) appear stillborn as soon as the lights go up on them. Mullen makes a bloody fine Dracula. He also makes an eerie asylum patient who feasts on the blood of insects and spiders, a well-meaning doctor, a gun-toting Texan, and an ever-more-imperiled real estate agent named Jonathan Harker in Dracula: The Journal of Jonathan Harker.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2009 | By JEROME MAIDA For the Daily News
With its new "The Complete Dracula" series, Dynamite has done the virtually impossible - infused fresh blood into one of our culture's oldest characters and engaged readers who feel he is old hat by telling his story in a new and exciting way. Ironically, they've done this by having authors Leah Moore and John Reppion painstakingly piece together Bram Stoker's original masterpiece. The fruit of their labor is that for the first time in 112 years, Stoker's work has been fully restored and his tale can be told as he envisioned it - and as only comics could successfully tell it. Stoker's original novel - though a classic - could be a bit hard to follow.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1995 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The many fans of Leslie Nielsen's klutzy Lt. Frank Drebin in the frenetically paced Naked Gun series may go to Dracula: Dead and Loving It in the hope of seeing Naked Gun. But for all of Mel Brooks' proven skill as a parodist, his comedy is relatively toothless and doesn't exploit Nielsen's gift. Brooks' finest spoof is Young Frankenstein, whose immortal lines include "Pardon me, boy, is this the Transylvania Station?" and his credentials in deriding the conventions of the horror movie are unrivaled.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2000 | By Elizabeth Zimmer, FOR THE INQUIRER
Right now, growth industries flourish by making products smaller and faster. Politics shrink to sound bites, correspondence to e-mail, meals to energy bars, news to headlines on CNN. Ballet audiences, however, buck this trend, demanding the three-act story ballets that were the rage in the 19th century, set in faraway, even imaginary, times and places. In bookstores, short stories surge in popularity, but in the opera house, short ballets languish next to such blockbusters as Swan Lake, Giselle, Coppelia, and Don Quixote.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1997 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If you happen to be in the neighborhood of 20th Street and Delancey Place over the next couple of months, better keep your neck covered. Especially if you're a young woman. Dracula, the vampire, has a taste for young women's blood. Some people say Dracula is just a legend. Some people say Dracula is dead. Ha! If Dracula's dead, how come so many people in so many places are celebrating his 100th birthday? Answer that, you doubters. Actually, it's not his 100th birthday; vampires, the undead, live for centuries.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 1991 | By Richard Fuller, Special to The Inquirer
All is darkness. As the black slowly lightens, we see that we're in a cave and that a tiny fire flickers in the distance. We can barely make out figures huddled about the flame. Slowly we move toward the brightness. As we get closer, we see that the figures are prehistoric women and men wearing animal furs. At the sound of a distant howl, they respond as one, leaning closer to the fire. We move in close to a grizzled face, its left eye sealed shut beneath thick scar tissue. At the sound of another animal cry, the good eye seems to blaze, then squint.
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NEWS
May 4, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
There's something wonderfully preposterous about Showtime's Penny Dreadful , an exciting nouveau-Gothic series about a group of characters from 19th-century novels who band together to fight evil. Eva Green plays the pivotal role of Vanessa Ives, a luscious Catholic sinner and psychic medium whose best friend, Mina Harker (from Bram Stoker's Dracula ) is taken by a devilish vampire-demon known only as the Master. Vanessa joins forces with Mina's father, renowned explorer and mountain climber Sir Malcolm (Timothy Dalton at his virile, thunderous best)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
The Awesome Fest and its founder, Josh Goldbloom, did a lot of growing up last year. With 2013's edition of the summer film and music festival, Goldbloom reverted to his childhood and unleashed upon Philadelphia a sensory-overloading package of '80s film fare, era-centric concerts, and themed promotions that he had always wanted to curate. There were problems. Goldbloom works with "a budget 10 times less than the big guns" of other local film festivals. And his van and film equipment were stolen.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bob Newhart will be remembered centuries hence as one of the greatest straight men in American comedy. The soft-spoken stand-up comic and actor who has the deadliest deadpan in the biz and the driest of humors was singularly brilliant in his first major sitcom, The Bob Newhart Show , which ran for five seasons on CBS from 1972 to 1978. In a great character choice, Newhart plays a therapist, Dr. Bob Hartley. Consistently calm in the midst of chaos, Bob listens in each episode to the strange and hilarious problems of a slew of series regulars who bare their souls to him. Florida Friebus has gone down in TV history for playing one of Bob's patients, Lillian Bakerman, an elderly woman who spends her therapy sessions knitting.
NEWS
October 25, 2013 | By Ellen Gray
* DRACULA. 10 tonight, NBC10. * SPRINGSTEEN AND I. 9 tonight, Showtime.   NBC SETS the wayback machine for Victorian London tonight in "Dracula," a lavish-ish new costume drama with a cold, dead heart at its center. That would be Vlad/Dracula himself, who, in his latest incarnation, is played by Jonathan Rhys Meyers ("The Tudors") in one of the dullest outings yet for both character and actor. I blow hot and cold on vampires, getting perhaps a bit too excited a few weeks ago to receive a review DVD set of "Kindred: The Embraced" - which lasted just eight episodes in 1996 - but rolling my eyes through "Twilight," longing for a sequel in which "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" slapped some sense into Bella.
NEWS
October 25, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's hard to blame Jonathan Rhys Meyers for signing up to star in - and produce - NBC's neo-Gothic, Victorian-period thriller, Dracula , which premieres Friday at 10 p.m. following Grimm 's third season opener. The Tudors heartthrob, who gave female fans shudders as Henry VIII, looks so good in those billowy white shirts that thesps since Valentino and Errol Flynn have worn in period dramas, it would have been hard to pass up the chance to play another monstrously ravenous, impeccably-dressed seducer and killer of women.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2012 | Reviewed by Carrie Rickey
Dropped Names Famous Men and Woman As I Knew Them   A Memoir By Frank Langella Harper. 356 pp. $25.99 When Frank Langella drops a name, it bounces, all the better for observers to see its vitality and arc. Dropped Names, the actor's keenly drawn gallery of cohorts, costars, and paramours from more than half a century on stage and screen, is an unalloyed delight. It turns out that this shadowy figure with the well-deep eyes and sepulchral voice is a shrewd observer of character — and characters.
NEWS
October 30, 2011
For Halloween weekend, match the horror-fiction author with his or her work. Answers: Below. 1. L.A. Banks. 2. Stephen King. 3. Ira Levin. 4. Susie Moloney. 5. Edgar Allan Poe. 6. Horacio Quiroga. 7. Anne Rice. 8. Mary Shelley. 9. Bram Stoker. 10. Koji Suzuki a. The Dark Tower, The Gunslinger . b. Dracula . c. A Dry Spell . d. Frankenstein . e. Interview With the Vampire . f. Ring . g. Rosemary's Baby . h. Stories of Love, Madness, and Death . i. Tales of the Grotesque and Arabesque . j. The Vampire Huntress Legend series.
NEWS
March 23, 2010 | By Carl Golden
The New Jersey Legislature periodically revisits a handful of ideas that have come to be known as "Dracula issues": They may look dead in the morning, but they rise to live again at night. Freshman State Sen. Donald Norcross (D., Camden) recently breathed a little life into a Dracula that's been around nearly as long as Transylvania's fanged count. He introduced a bill that would require all New Jersey public employees to live in the state. State Senate President Stephen Sweeney (D., Gloucester)
NEWS
October 20, 2009 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The vampire whose unquenchable thirst for blood Bram Stoker chronicled in the 1897 classic, Dracula, has returned. Again. And once again, history's ultimate revenant has oozed into our world out of the dread pen of a Stoker. The count's postmodern, postmortem return was engineered by Stoker's great-grandnephew Dacre Stoker - coauthor, with Dracula expert and screenwriter Ian Holt, of Dracula the Un-Dead, a terrific and terrifically bloody sequel to Bram's book, set in London 20 years after the first book closes.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2009 | By JEROME MAIDA For the Daily News
With its new "The Complete Dracula" series, Dynamite has done the virtually impossible - infused fresh blood into one of our culture's oldest characters and engaged readers who feel he is old hat by telling his story in a new and exciting way. Ironically, they've done this by having authors Leah Moore and John Reppion painstakingly piece together Bram Stoker's original masterpiece. The fruit of their labor is that for the first time in 112 years, Stoker's work has been fully restored and his tale can be told as he envisioned it - and as only comics could successfully tell it. Stoker's original novel - though a classic - could be a bit hard to follow.
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