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Draft Dodger

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NEWS
June 29, 1990 | By Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Vietnam War-era draft dodgers pardoned by President Jimmy Carter aren't entitled to have their criminal records erased by virtue of the pardon, a federal appeals court in Philadelphia ruled yesterday. A unanimous three-judge panel of the U.S. 3rd Circuit Court of Appeals reversed a decision by a federal judge in Pittsburgh who ruled last year that Gregory P. Noonan's conviction should be expunged. Noonan was convicted and sentenced to three years in prison for failure to submit for induction in 1968.
NEWS
June 13, 2016
ISSUE | MUHAMMAD ALI Not a draft dodger or coward I served in the Navy during the 1960s. I have great respect for all who enlisted or were drafted into the military during that time in our history. The writer of the letter "The greatest coward" (Tuesday) is entitled to dislike Muhammad Ali, but he is not entitled to change the facts. Ali was never a draft dodger. He never fled the country or entered college to avoid the draft. Whether he refused to fight in Vietnam because of his convictions or his religion, he was ready to accept the consequences, and he was stripped of his heavyweight title.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 1988 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Gresham's Law - the theory that bad money will drive good currency out of circulation - might apply to American independent movies. Lousy indie films seem to be driving intelligent ones out of distribution. Trouble is, the perpetrators are laudable in that they fund projects the studios would never touch, namely, movies where the character - not the actor - is the star. However honorable this mandate, many of the resulting films are tarnishing the indie reputation for maverick work.
NEWS
June 7, 1996 | BY MIKE ROYKO
'As a veteran," said Slats Grobnik, "I am proud of my record at ducking KP, playing poker and the long hours I spent drinking beer in the enlisted men's club. But I got to say that I think the Republicans ought to stop whacking Bill Clinton for being a draft-dodger. " Why? Do you believe it is a cheap shot, a low blow and distasteful negative campaigning? "Nah, cheap shots and low blows are as much a part of politics as they are of pro wrestling. Who'd pay attention without 'em?
NEWS
November 8, 1996 | BY MIKE ROYKO
When historians try to figure out what this election was all about, this might be remembered as the year when the 1960s finally caught up with the 1990s. That's because the voters tromped all over the so-called "character issue" in their eagerness to vote for the hip, with-it Bill Clinton and against the creaking Bob Dole. The weakness of "character" as an issue was that it was framed in standards that no longer mean a thing to the majority of voters who are under the geezer age. By character measures of the 1950s or earlier, Clinton could not have been elected.
NEWS
September 7, 2004
DANIEL SARAS' letter ("What kind of people . . . ") unfortunately demonstrates a one-sided and perhaps naive perspective about war. I don't disagree that the acts he points to (hiding in holy shrines, moving soldiers in ambulances, etc.) are despicable, but doesn't the phrase go "All's fair is love and war"? Perhaps there are other questions, too, like what kind of people are so arrogant as to think their way is the right and only way? What kinds of people are so righteous that they rape, torture and kill detainees?
NEWS
July 22, 1992 | by Richard Ben Cramer, From the New York Times
Well, here it is. Our People mag arrived with the pictures of Bill and Hillary Clinton in the hammock, on the lawn, with their daughter - "a little family," says the governor, "but a powerful one. " He's holding his wife's face in his hands. They're gorgeous, in love. America's couple! And a month or so ago, we were told it was divorce, for sure. I guess it was his week. It was time for America to be told of his belief in God, his dogged hard work, his care for people, his crush on his daughter - he took her to school every morning for eight years.
NEWS
February 2, 1997 | By Jodi Enda, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
It wasn't quite an apology, certainly not an admission of wrongdoing. President Clinton's concession last week that "mistakes were made" in raising money for his campaign left unclear exactly who made the blunders and what he thinks they did wrong. But that's the norm in a city in which finger-pointing is the preferred method of taking responsibility. Being president, it seems, means never having to say you're sorry. If Clinton's words sounded familiar, it's because they were uttered by men who preceded him in the Oval Office.
NEWS
July 17, 2012 | Letters to the Daily News Editor
AS ADJUTANT general of the Pennsylvania National Guard, I was more than a little upset to read David Swanson's online posting "The Sport of Military Recruiting" on July 12. In my 40 years in the military, I have read many articles but cannot recall one riddled with so many inaccuracies. Most Philadelphians will recall the Pennsylvania National Guard members who waded through their flooded streets last year to rescue citizens during Tropical Storm Lee and Hurricane Irene.
SPORTS
November 9, 2011 | By Elmer Smith, Philadelphia Daily News
JOE FRAZIER and I posed next to the ring apron in our tuxedos and fake smiles, waiting for an outcue from a director. As soon as the director's hand dropped, a man in a baseball cap emerged from behind the camera and brushed past me to get to get to his hero. "Joe Frazier," he said. "Let me shake the hand of the man who knocked that draft-dodger Clay on his butt. " The guy went on about how "Clay," as he called Muhammad Ali, was a draft dodger and a coward for refusing to fight for his country.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 13, 2016
ISSUE | MUHAMMAD ALI Not a draft dodger or coward I served in the Navy during the 1960s. I have great respect for all who enlisted or were drafted into the military during that time in our history. The writer of the letter "The greatest coward" (Tuesday) is entitled to dislike Muhammad Ali, but he is not entitled to change the facts. Ali was never a draft dodger. He never fled the country or entered college to avoid the draft. Whether he refused to fight in Vietnam because of his convictions or his religion, he was ready to accept the consequences, and he was stripped of his heavyweight title.
NEWS
June 8, 2016
ISSUE | MUHAMMAD ALI A role model for us all Muhammad Ali was a near-mythical figure with a worldwide reputation and aura ("The Greatest," Sunday). He was arguably the best heavyweight fighter of all time, but we remember his life for demonstrating so much more than that. He was an iconic civil rights advocate and a prodigious fund-raiser for the Parkinson's disease that ended his life at 74. More importantly, he was devoted to his faith. Rather than be drafted and serve in the military, which he objected to on religious grounds, he was stripped of his boxing title and faced imprisonment.
NEWS
July 25, 2012 | Letters to the Daily News Editor
I AM SUBMITTING this opinion in response to Mr. Kraus (letter, July 17) and all others that denigrate Muhammad Ali as a Liberty Award winner based on his status as a "draft dodger. "   What type of soul does a society have that would deny an individual or group of individuals basic civil rights based solely on their race? Further, what type of person would force (draft) the deprived group to fight for their "democracy"? In one voice you are saying you do not deserve to be treated with dignity as a human being .?
NEWS
July 17, 2012 | Letters to the Daily News Editor
AS ADJUTANT general of the Pennsylvania National Guard, I was more than a little upset to read David Swanson's online posting "The Sport of Military Recruiting" on July 12. In my 40 years in the military, I have read many articles but cannot recall one riddled with so many inaccuracies. Most Philadelphians will recall the Pennsylvania National Guard members who waded through their flooded streets last year to rescue citizens during Tropical Storm Lee and Hurricane Irene.
NEWS
November 10, 2011 | By William C. Kashatus, For the Daily News
Ironically, Joe Frazier's fame will forever be linked to his greatest rival, Muhammad Ali. The two athletes could hardly have been more dissimilar in personality and style. Ali was a brash, colorful, quick-witted master showman with a remarkable ability for self-promotion. Frazier, who died this week at 67, was quiet, humble, and likely to hang in the background. While Ali dispatched opponents with incredibly fast hands and reflexes, Frazier's style was blue-collar. He bobbed, weaved, and grunted before knocking out opponents with a devastating left hook.
SPORTS
November 9, 2011 | By Elmer Smith, Philadelphia Daily News
JOE FRAZIER and I posed next to the ring apron in our tuxedos and fake smiles, waiting for an outcue from a director. As soon as the director's hand dropped, a man in a baseball cap emerged from behind the camera and brushed past me to get to get to his hero. "Joe Frazier," he said. "Let me shake the hand of the man who knocked that draft-dodger Clay on his butt. " The guy went on about how "Clay," as he called Muhammad Ali, was a draft dodger and a coward for refusing to fight for his country.
SPORTS
September 6, 2009 | By Jeff McLane INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Eagles love their draft picks. They horde them like Super Bowl rings. So when the team announced its 53-man roster, and 2008 draft picks Bryan Smith and Jack Ikegwuonu were missing from the list, it came as a bit of a surprise. "Obviously, we had big expectations for both of those guys," Eagles general manager Tom Heckert said last night on a conference call. And then there was Lorenzo Booker. The Eagles traded for the running back during last year's draft, surrendering a fourth-round pick to Miami.
SPORTS
October 8, 2008
IT'S A COMMON dream and it grows along with the little boy. To make the major leagues, then to play for his favorite team and, ultimately, to hit the home run that wins the World Series. Wasn't it Freud who figured that out? Anyway, Chase Utley has already achieved the first. He passed on an opportunity to do the second. And to get a crack at the third, this year at least, the Phillies must beat the club their All-Star second baseman grew up rooting for, in the National League Championship Series beginning tomorrow night when the Dodgers come to Citizens Bank Park.
NEWS
September 7, 2004
DANIEL SARAS' letter ("What kind of people . . . ") unfortunately demonstrates a one-sided and perhaps naive perspective about war. I don't disagree that the acts he points to (hiding in holy shrines, moving soldiers in ambulances, etc.) are despicable, but doesn't the phrase go "All's fair is love and war"? Perhaps there are other questions, too, like what kind of people are so arrogant as to think their way is the right and only way? What kinds of people are so righteous that they rape, torture and kill detainees?
NEWS
November 8, 1999 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On Sept. 16, 1940, workers at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard laid the keel for the USS New Jersey, starting a job that would bring hundreds of men and women together for a common purpose. Few of them are left now, but for some who remain, the New Jersey's scheduled return to Philadelphia this week has provided an opportunity to recall that ship and that time. Former shipyard workers such as John Anthony Mizii, Raymond "Jimmy" Guthrie and Bill Schill. Strangers joined by a shared past.
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