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NEWS
August 7, 1988 | By Elisabeth Ryan Sullivan, Special to The Inquirer
The Moorestown Township Council is scheduled to hold a public hearing and possibly vote tomorrow night on two ordinances that would require residents to remove any sump pumps, roof drains or other drainage devices from the town's sanitary-sewer system or pay a yearly fee to keep the connection. Residents who plan to sell their homes or transfer ownership would have to disconnect all drains or post a $2,000 cash bond until the work is done. The ordinances are intended to relieve the township's overburdened waste- water treatment plant on Pine Street by diverting groundwater that does not need processing.
NEWS
February 26, 1987 | By Joe Fite, Special to The Inquirer
Requests for bids for the long-awaited Hatboro Farms storm drainage reconstruction project have been sent out and a contract is to be awarded in April, Hatboro Borough engineer Robert D. Gilmore has announced. Bids are to be opened March 26 and awarded by April 6, Gilmore said at Monday night's council meeting. According to borough manager John J. Roughan Jr., construction could begin by April 30 if no hitches developed during review of the bids by the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources and by Gilmore & Associates, the engineer's firm.
NEWS
August 16, 1987 | By Dianne Herrin, Special to The Inquirer
The New Garden Board of Supervisors has promised to pressure developer Hank Smedley of Chadds Ford Investments into taking steps to deal with water-runoff problems in the new Sherwood Pines housing development. "We're getting washed out," said Sherwood Pines resident Evie Morabito at the supervisors' meeting Monday night. The board agreed that Sherwood Road should be graded to ensure better drainage. The supervisors intend to "make Smedley attend the next supervisors' meeting on Sept.
NEWS
July 30, 1989 | By Neil Schur, Special to The Inquirer
To correct drainage problems in the Tarnsfield development, Westampton Township engineer David Denton has recommended installation of underdrains and lateral piping from several yards to the street. For several months, an orange-brown, slippery film has covered the sidewalk and street in front of five homes on Sherwood Lane. The lawns at the end of the cul-de-sac are soggy and deteriorating. And pressure on the roadway causes water to bubble up through small cracks. "I can't tell you the number of people who walk by and look at us like 'what is going on at your house?
NEWS
March 11, 1990 | By Mary Anne Janco, Special to The Inquirer
A group of Nether Providence Township residents told the Township Commission on Thursday that they feared a proposed three-lot subdivision off Rose Valley Road would aggravate water problems. The plan submitted by Truitt Enterprises Inc. calls for two single-family homes. One home already sits on the 1.5-acre site. "We really are concerned about the water," resident Lois Lax told the commissioners. "We do have an existing problem," said her husband, Stephen. The Laxes live on Morgan Lane, which is downhill from the proposed development.
NEWS
March 5, 1987 | By Carol Leonnig, Special to The Inquirer
Developers for the controversial Avignon project in Gladwyne have proposed a new water-retention plan to the Lower Merion Planning Commission in an effort to address commission concerns about the previous plan. The commission recommended rejecting the Avignon project at its February meeting, primarily because of questions about the performance of the proposed water drainage and sewer systems and whether the project would interfere with its neighbors' natural water supplies. The development would place 16 homes on a 32-acre parcel between Woodmont and Club House Roads.
NEWS
March 18, 1990 | By Judy Baehr, Special to The Inquirer
Residents of West Haddonfield may see survey teams on their blocks over the next few months planning improvements to correct long-standing drainage problems in the area. They will look for the best locations for storm sewer inlets, new diversion pipes and ditches and curb improvements. According to borough administrator Richard Schwab, the borough commissioners have ordered an engineering study that will last through the spring to find the best way to divert water runoff to Newton Creek.
NEWS
July 9, 1996 | By Deborah Kong, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Residents of three neighborhoods that have been plagued by flooding for years may never be comfortable enough to sing in the rain, but action taken by the council last night might enable some to stop dreading even a drizzle. The council approved three resolutions and one ordinance that, among other things, would authorize an engineering service to prepare permits and plans for a storm-water retention basin and drainage-system improvements in the Kingston, Three Oaks and Barclay developments.
NEWS
June 21, 1992 | By Christine Bahls, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Bristol Township officials have again asked the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation whether it could pay for the township to connect to the state's storm-water drainage improvements when PennDot widens Route 413. And again, the township was virtually rebuffed - but the PennDot engineer who appeared before the Township Council on Tuesday night said the agency would try to save the township as much money as possible. "We don't have the money in our budget," said PennDot engineer Lawrence Link, as township officials explained to him and the agency's consulting engineer that the township did not have the money either.
NEWS
June 14, 1990 | By Anne Fahy, Special to The Inquirer
It might take court action, but Upper Merion Township has assured residents of an upscale development that work left unfinished by the developer will be completed. Residents of Bob White Timbers, saying they felt abandoned by the developer who stopped work on the 24 single-family homes and left them with severe drainage problems, have turned to township officials to get $100,000 in escrow released. After the supervisors' meeting Monday night, resident Joseph Rapine said that sometimes after a heavy rain, he feels like his $250,000 house sits in a puddle of mud. The problem, according to township engineer Roman Pronczak, is that developer Andrew I. Kane deviated from the development plan approved by the township and left some of the other work unfinished.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2015 | By Sally McCabe, For The Inquirer
Tend your perennials.   Although they love the heat and water of tropical storms, they don't particularly love heavy downpours and high winds. Stake perennials and tall annuals to keep them from getting beaten down. But be careful what you use: I once grabbed some trimmed privet branches to support the lilies, and every blessed one of them rooted. You can also buy green florist sticks or some of those fancy metal hoops that hold things up without being obvious - like a good sports bra. Pay special attention to container plantings.
NEWS
June 12, 2014 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Common Pleas Court judge Tuesday ruled that former Philadelphia NAACP president Jerome Whyatt Mondesire must turn over financial records from a community development corporation that he controls to three members of its executive board. After listening to about an hour of arguments from lawyers, Judge Gary Glazer ruled that Mondesire, who was not present, must provide records of Next Generation CDC dating from 2005 to Donald "Ducky" Birts, Sid Booker, and the Rev. Elisha Morris.
BUSINESS
January 20, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The natural gas industry wants to use water from abandoned coal mines for hydraulic fracturing operations, replacing fresh water with acid-mine drainage that now poisons thousands of miles of Pennsylvania streams. What's not to like? Plenty, it seems. Environmental activists are mounting a campaign to derail a Pennsylvania Senate bill that would immunize Marcellus Shale gas producers or any other industry that uses acid-mine drainage (AMD) for "beneficial use. " Thirty-five environmental groups signed a letter delivered to senators Thursday that said the proposal known as Senate Bill 411 "would harm streams and communities where the AMD water is being withdrawn" by allowing the transfer of water out of source watersheds.
NEWS
May 10, 2013 | By Wayne Parry, Associated Press
BAY HEAD, N.J. - The state Transportation Department is reversing gears on its ambitious plan to rebuild a road ravaged by Hurricane Sandy. The department originally planned to start work on the $215 million Route 35 project in Ocean County this summer. It now plans to wait until September to do the most disruptive parts of the plan. Instead of regrading and repaving the highway, the state will work on pumps and drainage improvements that won't require traffic to stop or lanes to be closed during the summer heavy-traffic months.
BUSINESS
January 10, 2013 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection has finalized a process to encourage the use of acid mine drainage for hydraulic fracturing, part of an effort to reduce the use of freshwater in extracting oil and gas from shale. The DEP's white paper says that proposals to use "mine-influenced" water must include sampling and characterization of the water, as well as details about how the water will be transported, stored and used. More than 300 million gallons of water is discharged from abandoned coal mines each day, impairing more than 5,500 miles of Pennsylvania waterways.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2012 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Second of a two-part story. It is late March, and the most visible part of my city garden has been reduced to bare dirt. Drainage problems in the front yard have finally been corrected and the five-foot-deep trenches filled in. The casualties include almost a decade's worth of plantings, which have either been moved elsewhere on the property or buried with the new pipes. It's time to plant again. Which illustrates the garden's most unforgiving lesson: You will never be "done," and this is both the fun and the pain of it. Emily Tynan, a professional gardener who is helping me get from pain to fun, calls this endless loop of doing and redoing "a lovely, beautiful, frustrating dance," one that I - and, I quickly discover, she - cannot resist.
NEWS
October 9, 2012 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
By summer's end, the lovingly tended garden in Anthony Bellosi's backyard had yielded hundreds of pounds of tomatoes, peppers, carrots, and beans; dozens of bushels of Brussels sprouts, Mexican sour gherkins, kale, and corn; $6,000 in township fines; an Oct. 9 court date, and a ton of aggravation. It was not exactly the harvest he had hoped for. A glum Bellosi recently surveyed his half-acre in Aston Township, Delaware County - the 20 raised beds he built over the last three years, the apple, plum, pear, and fig trees he planted - and braced for the worst.
NEWS
July 14, 2011 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
A $32 million Pennsauken train station to link the Atlantic City Line and the River Line got a boost Wednesday when the NJ Transit board approved construction of the final phase. The board approved a $13.8 million contract with Terminal Construction Corp. of Wood-Ridge, N.J., which will build platforms, a parking lot, drainage improvements, and customer services. The new Pennsauken Transit Center, a two-level station near Derousse Avenue west of River Road, will allow direct transfers between trains on the east-west Atlantic City Line and the north-south River Line.
LIVING
March 12, 2010 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Question: In the last 10 years I have had the roof replaced, replaced five windows, the furnace, and a sewer line, added a sunroom, and had drain tiles installed around the house and yard. The first problem is water seepage from the outside walls into the basement. After retrenching inside and installing drain tiles outside, I don't understand why the water keeps coming in. The second problem is that the roof shingles look terrible - they are discolored, and losing texture.
NEWS
November 29, 2006 | By Joel Bewley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A municipal judge ordered South Jersey's crabcake king yesterday to shell out nearly $200,000 in fines, saying he ignored a court order to fix problems at his Moorestown estate that flood his neighbors' properties after heavy rains. Judge Philip J. Iapalucci assessed the penalty after reviewing the financial records of Robert Sliwowski, who owns the Bobby Chez chain of crabcake take-out restaurants. The exact amount - $198,900 - comes to $650 for each day Iapalucci determined Sliwowski had failed to comply with the township's zoning laws.
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