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Drapery

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NEWS
September 20, 1992 | By Larry King, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One evening last fall, an Abington Township mother looked into her baby daughter's canopy crib and discovered a parent's nightmare. Nine-month-old Lindsay Jean Iannarone lay still, not breathing, with an 18- inch length of cloth ribbon wrapped around her neck. She had accidentally strangled, an autopsy concluded. The tie-back ribbon that caused the infant's death was part of a lace drapery set that the mother had bought the previous summer to decorate the crib. Last week in Montgomery County Court, Lynn Iannarone of Jenkintown filed a civil suit seeking damages for the Sept.
FOOD
August 7, 1991 | by Polly Fisher, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: Can fresh, sweet corn from our garden be frozen with husk and all? Or should it be blanched first? - Mary Dear Mary: Sweet corn, like most vegetables, will develop bitterness if frozen without blanching first, so you really must clean and blanch it before freezing. To freeze whole ears, husk, remove the silk and wash the corn. Trim if necessary. Blanch small ears 7 minutes, medium-sized ears 9 minutes, large ears 11 minutes. Pack in freezer-proof wrap or plastic freezer bags, withdrawing as much air as possible; seal, label and freeze.
LIVING
November 29, 1996 | By Dylan Landis, FOR THE INQUIRER
Beneath its two-story-high cathedral ceiling, Jack Lenor Larsen's living room in Long Island, N.Y., could have seemed too vast for comfort. Instead, it's almost intimate because Larsen upholstered the entire space, straight to the ceiling's peak, with straw-colored Egyptian damask. Interior designer Marjorie Shushan also grappled with visually cool surroundings: a Manhattan apartment with white-box rooms and no distinguishing architecture. To give the place character, she assembled an orchestra of textures: silk taffeta on the sofas, antique tapestry on the ottomans, 18th-century embroidery on the pillows.
LIVING
July 9, 2004 | By Elaine Markoutsas FOR THE INQUIRER
From simple sheers to lavish silk-embroidered panels, draperies are so much more than window dressing. They can shape a room's personality and ground its design style. There's an amazingly broad choice of off-the-rack curtains embracing most design styles and fashion-forward hues in prices from under $10 to several hundred dollars for a single panel. The Silk Trading Co., a specialist, features its trademark Drapery Out-of-a-Box, and the high-end haute fabrics, including lush striped and patterned organzas as well as silks that are embroidered, beaded or trimmed with ribbon, are available by the yard.
NEWS
May 19, 1996 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Martin "Big Marty" Schienholtz, 67, founder and owner of a retail carpet chain that evolved from a slipcover and drapery store, died of diabetes Friday at St. Mary Medical Center in Langhorne, Bucks County. He lived in nearby Yardley. Mr. Schienholtz was born in the Feltonville section of Philadelphia. He attended Olney High School and the Peirce School of Business Administration. "He wanted to get into business of some kind," said his daughter Hope Lipschutz. He completed two years of business courses and worked as a cutter for a clothing manufacturer.
NEWS
November 14, 2012 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stan Morantz, 69, of Warrington, a longtime Philadelphia business owner and inventor, died Saturday, Nov. 10, at Doylestown Hospital of complications from Lou Gehrig's disease. Morantz Ultrasonics, headquartered in Northeast Philadelphia, with an office in Las Vegas, and having $3 million in revenue annually, grew from his father's drapery business at 40th and Chestnut Streets. While working for his father, who used labor-intensive techniques to make draperies, he invented tools and processes to speed up manufacturing.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 1997 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Late December is still nominally a spiritual season and thus an appropriate time to consider Eleanor Miller's small panel-paintings at Schmidt/Dean's Spruce Street gallery. Miller's images don't have anything to do with religion; they're spiritual in a purely pantheistic sense. Her paintings are celebrations of nature, specifically trees, fruits and flowers, which Miller presents as emblems of a mystical universe. The presentation is strongly iconographic; the fruits and flowers hover in space like heavenly visions, illuminated by a nimbus of celestial light.
NEWS
November 10, 2006 | By Julie Stoiber INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The plaid silk is a showstopper, bold blocks of fuchsia crisscrossed by bands of black and kelly green. "This is a drapery fabric," Susan Stapler said. Then she unfurled it and grinned. "But imagine it as an evening gown. " She's got the Stapler eye for color and texture and - above all - possibility, a gift handed down from her grandfather, Charles. He launched the family fabric business from a pushcart on Fourth Street, and over more than a century, it grew into a supplier of fine textiles with an international clientele.
NEWS
January 28, 2001 | By Aamer Madhani, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
What started as a dream of two longtime friends with an appreciation for tea appears to be turning into a quick success for three Burlington County women. More than three weeks have passed since Diane Thomas, Florence Dorofy and Dorofy's daughter, Shanon Abbott, opened the Cabbage Rose Tea Room and Bakery on Route 38. And from the first day, the ornately decorated, seven-table cafe has been overwhelmed by a rush of customers who want to partake in English traditions of low tea (with which light fare is offered)
NEWS
May 15, 1995 | By Craig LeBan and Terri Sanginiti, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENTS
Jennel Rodriguez was jolted awake yesterday, Mother's Day, by the blare of a smoke detector in her living room. Minutes later, she realized that the apartment she shared with her husband Orlando, 27, and son, Robert Bruce, 3, was on fire - and that they could not get to the front door through the thick smoke. She grabbed her son, Rodriguez, 26, said, and headed to the bedroom window. Holding him tight against her, she was poised to jump when she caught sight of a downstairs neighbor and shouted for help.
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NEWS
November 14, 2012 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stan Morantz, 69, of Warrington, a longtime Philadelphia business owner and inventor, died Saturday, Nov. 10, at Doylestown Hospital of complications from Lou Gehrig's disease. Morantz Ultrasonics, headquartered in Northeast Philadelphia, with an office in Las Vegas, and having $3 million in revenue annually, grew from his father's drapery business at 40th and Chestnut Streets. While working for his father, who used labor-intensive techniques to make draperies, he invented tools and processes to speed up manufacturing.
NEWS
November 10, 2006 | By Julie Stoiber INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The plaid silk is a showstopper, bold blocks of fuchsia crisscrossed by bands of black and kelly green. "This is a drapery fabric," Susan Stapler said. Then she unfurled it and grinned. "But imagine it as an evening gown. " She's got the Stapler eye for color and texture and - above all - possibility, a gift handed down from her grandfather, Charles. He launched the family fabric business from a pushcart on Fourth Street, and over more than a century, it grew into a supplier of fine textiles with an international clientele.
LIVING
July 9, 2004 | By Elaine Markoutsas FOR THE INQUIRER
From simple sheers to lavish silk-embroidered panels, draperies are so much more than window dressing. They can shape a room's personality and ground its design style. There's an amazingly broad choice of off-the-rack curtains embracing most design styles and fashion-forward hues in prices from under $10 to several hundred dollars for a single panel. The Silk Trading Co., a specialist, features its trademark Drapery Out-of-a-Box, and the high-end haute fabrics, including lush striped and patterned organzas as well as silks that are embroidered, beaded or trimmed with ribbon, are available by the yard.
NEWS
January 28, 2001 | By Aamer Madhani, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
What started as a dream of two longtime friends with an appreciation for tea appears to be turning into a quick success for three Burlington County women. More than three weeks have passed since Diane Thomas, Florence Dorofy and Dorofy's daughter, Shanon Abbott, opened the Cabbage Rose Tea Room and Bakery on Route 38. And from the first day, the ornately decorated, seven-table cafe has been overwhelmed by a rush of customers who want to partake in English traditions of low tea (with which light fare is offered)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 1997 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Late December is still nominally a spiritual season and thus an appropriate time to consider Eleanor Miller's small panel-paintings at Schmidt/Dean's Spruce Street gallery. Miller's images don't have anything to do with religion; they're spiritual in a purely pantheistic sense. Her paintings are celebrations of nature, specifically trees, fruits and flowers, which Miller presents as emblems of a mystical universe. The presentation is strongly iconographic; the fruits and flowers hover in space like heavenly visions, illuminated by a nimbus of celestial light.
LIVING
November 29, 1996 | By Dylan Landis, FOR THE INQUIRER
Beneath its two-story-high cathedral ceiling, Jack Lenor Larsen's living room in Long Island, N.Y., could have seemed too vast for comfort. Instead, it's almost intimate because Larsen upholstered the entire space, straight to the ceiling's peak, with straw-colored Egyptian damask. Interior designer Marjorie Shushan also grappled with visually cool surroundings: a Manhattan apartment with white-box rooms and no distinguishing architecture. To give the place character, she assembled an orchestra of textures: silk taffeta on the sofas, antique tapestry on the ottomans, 18th-century embroidery on the pillows.
NEWS
May 19, 1996 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Martin "Big Marty" Schienholtz, 67, founder and owner of a retail carpet chain that evolved from a slipcover and drapery store, died of diabetes Friday at St. Mary Medical Center in Langhorne, Bucks County. He lived in nearby Yardley. Mr. Schienholtz was born in the Feltonville section of Philadelphia. He attended Olney High School and the Peirce School of Business Administration. "He wanted to get into business of some kind," said his daughter Hope Lipschutz. He completed two years of business courses and worked as a cutter for a clothing manufacturer.
LIVING
April 26, 1996 | By Jill P. Capuzzo, FOR THE INQUIRER
Virginia Miller leads a visitor through a maze of 100 windows, each one adorned with a different combination of diaphanous curtains, casually arranged top sashes, colorful tiebacks and wrought-iron rods. These are windows with no views, and no walls, for that matter. This is the window-coverings department of J.C. Penney at the King of Prussia Mall, where the knowledgeable, efficient Miller can outfit a total decorating novice with the latest look in window treatments guaranteed to turn a drab apartment into something worthy of Melrose Place.
LIVING
March 1, 1996 | By Michael Walsh, FOR THE INQUIRER
People who live in glass homes sometimes regret it. As thermal efficiency has increased, huge windows, glass doors and even entire walls of windows have become enormously popular. They drench interiors with light, perhaps adding a spectacular view. That's all very well during daylight hours. But many people find that they can't tolerate an expanse of darkness outside those windows come sundown. Humans aren't naturally nocturnal animals, and a large expanse of glass at night has the disconcerting effect of turning into a mirror that hides what's behind it. The bottom line is that, as much as we've embraced big windows and transparent walls, most of us still crave some reassuring sense of containment and enclosure.
NEWS
May 26, 1995 | By Laura Genao, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
There's more to stables than hay and horse manure when you add a little interior design. At the Devon Horse Show, many stables are outfitted with statues of puppies, flower pots, chromed name plates and draperies - all in an effort to domesticate the drab wooden buildings. "It's a lot of work to set up something that you're going to want to look at because it's pretty," said Linda Hough of Sutton Place farm in Morgan Hill, Calif. "It's like setting up a circus tent. " At Devon, Sutton Place has covered up drab stable walls, with light blue drapery.
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