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Dreadlocks

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NEWS
May 4, 1991
Officials at Huntingdon State Prison should have more important things to worry about than the length of Mumia Abu-Jamal's hair. The convicted Philadelphia cop-killer is rotting away on Huntingdon's death row, and his hair's apparently a mess. It hasn't been cut since June 1983, so you can just imagine. Ordered to submit to the barber's shears, he made a federal case out of it, contending in the U.S. 3rd Circuit Court of Appeals that forcing him to cut his hair would be a violation of his religious freedom.
LIVING
December 19, 1999 | By Annette John-Hall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The nappy revolution couldn't come soon enough for Bihiya Cabral. After years of enduring scalp-singeing perming, too-hot comb pressing, and enough chemicals to cause a nuclear accident, Cabral was ready to liberate herself from a European standard of beauty. So was Terrence Gore. Half a lifetime of sporting Afros, fades, flattops, texturizers and jheri curls had left him spare on top and hungry inside for a true identity - and just a little kink. The answer, they both decided, was to lock - and throw away the key. Forget about technology, globalization and the Atkins diet.
NEWS
October 8, 2007
RE JENICE Armstong's column "Glamour Takes a Hit": I'd say the advice against dreadlocks was not race-based, but rather based on maintaining appropriate workplace grooming. Law is a field where appearance is important, as a lawyer's demeanor and appearance can influence a jury. Dreadlocks look like matted hair, and appear unkempt. I agree it may seem like a race-based judgment, but if a white lawyer wore dreadlocks and was told they were unacceptable, what would the defense for keeping the hairstyle be in that case?
SPORTS
February 24, 1999 | by Marcus Hayes, Daily News Sports Writer
Two minutes with his mother is all it takes to know where Texas running back Ricky Williams gets his character. Much is made of Williams's dreadlocks and piercings and imposing manner and how strikingly they contrast with his soft-spoken nature and intelligence. His mother, Sandy Williams, understands the recurring surprise. She is a buyer for a software company and she stands apart from nothing, all average and pretty with her shortish, gelled, curly hair and direct, bright manner.
NEWS
July 28, 2000 | By Sandra Shea
The GOP recently sent to all its delegates a special edition "Convention Barbie" created by Mattel. She's dressed in a pearl- button red suit and red high heels. We think Mattel overlooked another opportunity: Protest Barbie (a concept originally mentioned by WorldNetDaily columnist Maralyn Polak). So, if Mattel won't do it, we will. We created this GOP Convention Special Edition Protest Barbie, complete with white-girl dreadlocks, cell phone, "Free Mumia" T-shirt and, although invisible in this photograph, obligatory tongue piercing.
SPORTS
March 26, 1998 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
Call this one the mane event. In one of those silly sideshows that tend to attach themselves to fight cards like barnacles on a whale, Frank Maloney, who manages World Boxing Council heavyweight champion Lennox Lewis, issued a hair-raising challenge to Shannon Briggs. "There's only one man who can be king of the jungle, who can wear that mane," Maloney said yesterday at a press conference at Caesars Atlantic City. "And that man is Lennox Lewis. " Maloney publicly wondered if Briggs, who wears his hair piled high in golden-bleached dreadlocks, would be willing to shave his head if he lost to Lewis Saturday night in Atlantic City Convention Hall.
SPORTS
August 10, 2008 | By Rick O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
How short is short? Yes, stories about Manny Ramirez won't go away. . . . but some of his trademark dreadlocks might. Dodgers manager Joe Torre again asked his new leftfielder when he would get a haircut and was told it would be within the next week. "He asked, 'How short?' I said I'd get back to him," Torre said in an MLB.com report. When asked by Torre how important wearing the dreadlocks was, Ramirez said it was more important for him to fit in with his new club and not be given preferential treatment.
NEWS
July 1, 2010 | By MENSAH M. DEAN, deanm@phillynews.com 215-854-5949
The bank employees knew something was wrong on May 3, 2008, even before the thieves struck, they testified yesterday during the trial of two men accused of robbing a Port Richmond bank and helping to murder a police officer during their getaway. "I knew five to 10 minutes before we got robbed that we were going to get robbed," Bank of America employee Brandon Smith said, noting the suspicious-looking man in the produce section of the ShopRite, where the bank is situated. Besides the dark shades over his eyes, the mask covering his mouth and long dreadlocks obscuring part of his face, the man stood out because he was staring at the bank instead of shopping, Smith said.
NEWS
September 13, 2013
THINK FOR A moment that you're a little kid all excited about the first day of school. You show up looking forward to meeting your new teacher, only to be turned away because your hairstyle is banned. That's what happened to 7-year-old Tiana Parker recently in Oklahoma when she got sent home from school because her hair didn't conform to the school's dress code. Tiana, who's African-American, wears her hair in short locks, tightly coiled hair typically referred to as dreadlocks. At the time, the Deborah Brown Community School, a predominantly black school in Tulsa, banned "hairstyles such as dreadlocks, Afros, mohawks and other faddish styles.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2015 | By Howard Gensler
TODAY in the crosshairs, E! host and "Fashion Police" panelist Giuliana Rancic . Big G, as she's frequently called, is being taken to task by Disney Channel star Zendaya , who has been a guest on "Fashion Police," because Giuliana commented on her Oscars red-carpet dreadlocks by saying, "I feel that she smells like patchouli oil . . . or weed. Yeah, maybe weed. " Zendaya, who is black, didn't like it, the Washington Post reported, noting on Twitter that dreadlocks are a symbol of "strength and beauty" and not merely an easy stereotype of pot-smoking Rastas.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2015 | By Howard Gensler
TODAY in the crosshairs, E! host and "Fashion Police" panelist Giuliana Rancic . Big G, as she's frequently called, is being taken to task by Disney Channel star Zendaya , who has been a guest on "Fashion Police," because Giuliana commented on her Oscars red-carpet dreadlocks by saying, "I feel that she smells like patchouli oil . . . or weed. Yeah, maybe weed. " Zendaya, who is black, didn't like it, the Washington Post reported, noting on Twitter that dreadlocks are a symbol of "strength and beauty" and not merely an easy stereotype of pot-smoking Rastas.
NEWS
September 13, 2013
THINK FOR A moment that you're a little kid all excited about the first day of school. You show up looking forward to meeting your new teacher, only to be turned away because your hairstyle is banned. That's what happened to 7-year-old Tiana Parker recently in Oklahoma when she got sent home from school because her hair didn't conform to the school's dress code. Tiana, who's African-American, wears her hair in short locks, tightly coiled hair typically referred to as dreadlocks. At the time, the Deborah Brown Community School, a predominantly black school in Tulsa, banned "hairstyles such as dreadlocks, Afros, mohawks and other faddish styles.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2010 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Columnist
The woman Amy Ryan plays in Jack Goes Boating - Connie, a single, loveless New Yorker with a job in the basement of a funeral parlor - is so painfully shy and socially maladroit that, for a time in the Philip Seymour Hoffman -directed indie, it hurts to watch her. "It's horrible," Ryan says, laughing. "Poor Connie!" But then some friends arrange a meeting with the equally awkward and balking Jack - played, with natty dreadlocks and portly girth, by Hoffman - and the two hit it off. Haltingly, with excruciating miscues and miscommunication, they finally connect.
NEWS
July 1, 2010 | By MENSAH M. DEAN, deanm@phillynews.com 215-854-5949
The bank employees knew something was wrong on May 3, 2008, even before the thieves struck, they testified yesterday during the trial of two men accused of robbing a Port Richmond bank and helping to murder a police officer during their getaway. "I knew five to 10 minutes before we got robbed that we were going to get robbed," Bank of America employee Brandon Smith said, noting the suspicious-looking man in the produce section of the ShopRite, where the bank is situated. Besides the dark shades over his eyes, the mask covering his mouth and long dreadlocks obscuring part of his face, the man stood out because he was staring at the bank instead of shopping, Smith said.
SPORTS
August 10, 2008 | By Rick O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
How short is short? Yes, stories about Manny Ramirez won't go away. . . . but some of his trademark dreadlocks might. Dodgers manager Joe Torre again asked his new leftfielder when he would get a haircut and was told it would be within the next week. "He asked, 'How short?' I said I'd get back to him," Torre said in an MLB.com report. When asked by Torre how important wearing the dreadlocks was, Ramirez said it was more important for him to fit in with his new club and not be given preferential treatment.
NEWS
October 8, 2007
RE JENICE Armstong's column "Glamour Takes a Hit": I'd say the advice against dreadlocks was not race-based, but rather based on maintaining appropriate workplace grooming. Law is a field where appearance is important, as a lawyer's demeanor and appearance can influence a jury. Dreadlocks look like matted hair, and appear unkempt. I agree it may seem like a race-based judgment, but if a white lawyer wore dreadlocks and was told they were unacceptable, what would the defense for keeping the hairstyle be in that case?
BUSINESS
June 1, 2002 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Orsino Allen, 35, a US Airways worker formerly employed at Philadelphia International Airport, will receive $50,000 from the airline to settle a religious-practices suit filed against it by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Allen had complained that US Airways' Philadelphia office failed to accommodate his Rastafarian religious beliefs, retaliating against him for his long hair and dreadlocks, which he wore in a ponytail. In settling the suit, US Airways, of Arlington, Va., denied it violated any federal laws about religious practice.
NEWS
April 7, 2001 | By Monica Rhor and Robert Moran INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Eight years ago at Columbus High School in Nebraska, Mitchell Guilliatt was an honor student, cocaptain of the football team and a wrestler. He had been nominated for homecoming king. But yesterday, he looked nothing like a proverbial portrait of wholesomeness. Dreadlocked and dressed in camouflage, he was wrestled to the ground by a park ranger after vandalizing the Liberty Bell with a hammer. Stephen Aspleaf, assistant principal at Columbus High in eastern Nebraska, said people there saw Guilliatt's picture on the Internet and were struck by his transformation.
NEWS
July 28, 2000 | By Sandra Shea
The GOP recently sent to all its delegates a special edition "Convention Barbie" created by Mattel. She's dressed in a pearl- button red suit and red high heels. We think Mattel overlooked another opportunity: Protest Barbie (a concept originally mentioned by WorldNetDaily columnist Maralyn Polak). So, if Mattel won't do it, we will. We created this GOP Convention Special Edition Protest Barbie, complete with white-girl dreadlocks, cell phone, "Free Mumia" T-shirt and, although invisible in this photograph, obligatory tongue piercing.
LIVING
December 19, 1999 | By Annette John-Hall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The nappy revolution couldn't come soon enough for Bihiya Cabral. After years of enduring scalp-singeing perming, too-hot comb pressing, and enough chemicals to cause a nuclear accident, Cabral was ready to liberate herself from a European standard of beauty. So was Terrence Gore. Half a lifetime of sporting Afros, fades, flattops, texturizers and jheri curls had left him spare on top and hungry inside for a true identity - and just a little kink. The answer, they both decided, was to lock - and throw away the key. Forget about technology, globalization and the Atkins diet.
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