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Dredging

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NEWS
January 26, 2006
RE THE RECENT letter "Make N.J. pay in dredging dispute": Great, the writer agrees with Gov. Rendell that he should shut down the PATCO high-speed rail line and the bridges in order to force us into submission. Very, very neighborly of you. Maybe you can extend an even more neighborly gesture by agreeing to have some of that sludge dumped in YOUR backyard. Just so you know, and living way out there in Harrisburg you might not, but Pennsylvanians use those bridges and that train as well.
NEWS
July 10, 2006
DEAR GOV. Corzine: I represent a substantial portion of the area along the Delaware River, including Tioga Marine Terminal. I believe as you do that our ports are crucial to the economic futures of Pennsylvania and New Jersey. I urge you to help break the deadlock over the Delaware River dredging issue. Dredging to 45 feet will allow ports to accommodate larger ships and compete with ports in other sections of the United States. Failure to dredge will force companies to move to other ports.
BUSINESS
January 28, 1999 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Plans for dredging a deeper shipping channel in the Delaware River - touted as a key to a competitive Philadelphia port - are under fire from environmentalists, who yesterday called the $300 million project a waste of money and "environmental roulette. " "This project is going to contaminate our water with toxins like mercury, lead and PCBs. It's going to threaten our drinking water," said Maya K. van Rossum, of the Delaware Riverkeeper Network, at a rally near City Hall. "Dredge No More, Army Corps," chanted 15 members of the Alliance to Dump the Delaware Deepening Project outside the Wanamaker Building headquarters of the Army Corps of Engineers.
NEWS
January 30, 2006
IN HIS LETTER responding to my stance on the dredging issue, Rick Bauer forgets to mention that Pennsylvania has agreed to take 75 percent of the sludge from the project. That is more than a fair amount for a project that would benefit both sides of the river. The last time I checked, both states have ports. While accusing me of being "unneighborly," he fails to take into consideration that New Jersey reneged on a promise to Pennsylvania. Apparently he thinks that Pennsylvania should just accept the inexcusable conduct of the Garden State.
NEWS
October 1, 1999 | BY DENNIS ROCHFORD
Pay dirt. That's the type of dirt this region will see when the dredging of the Delaware River main channel to 45 feet is completed. Each day, the Delaware River provides ships laden with myriad products access to the region's front doors. With a deeper channel and the use of economies of scale, ships will be able to carry more cargo on the Delaware. Businesses and consumers will have access to additional products resulting in added business and prosperity for the region. But, as evidenced by your editorial (Sept.
BUSINESS
October 3, 2009 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In what could be another blow to the long-delayed deepening of the Delaware River, U.S. House and Senate budget negotiators have restricted an annual federal appropriation for the project, seen as a boon to the region's economy and ports. But Sen. Arlen Specter (D., Pa.) and Pennsylvania port officials said yesterday that the measure would not block the dredging from the current 40 feet to 45 feet once the Army Corps of Engineers decides to begin. The appropriations bill still must be approved by the full House and Senate.
NEWS
August 13, 1999 | BY DENNIS ROCHFORD
W. Russell G. Byers (column, July 27) was correct to state that dredging the Delaware River was potentially a "fabulous idea. " From the standpoint of the benefits it will bring to residents, communities and businesses, there are not three problems, there is only one: Byers' belief that this project might be a fabulous idea. A 45-foot main channel will be a boon to businesses and residents alike. The business perspective is simple to grasp. A deeper channel means more cargo can be carried on one ship.
BUSINESS
April 16, 2010 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Federal agents seized boxes and documents this week from two Hazleton area companies with contracts to transport dredge material from a Navy pier on the Schuylkill in Philadelphia. Authorities, including agents from the FBI's Scranton office, raided offices of Fort Mifflin Reclamation Associates Inc. in Kingston near Wilkes Barre, and Hazleton Creek Properties L.L.C., Hazleton, on Tuesday. Fort Mifflin Reclamation won a $21 million contract in 2006 from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to haul 500,000 cubic yards of sediment to Hazleton as fill for abandoned mines, said Corps spokeswoman Sarah Rivette.
NEWS
January 11, 1989 | By Rita M. Sutter, Special to The Inquirer
Here is a tale of coincidence and miscommunication that cost the township of Mount Holly money and aggravation. Last year, Mount Holly officials noted that the water in the Rancocas Creek, as it runs through the county seat, was no longer actually flowing but slowly choking through a waterway obstructed with a tenacious garble of muck, natural detritus, rusted shopping carts and automobile tires. In December 1987, the council decided to use $150,000 of a $300,000 Small Cities Grant - available through the Community Development Block Grant administered by the state for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development - to dredge an "unsightly" half-mile stretch of the Rancocas Creek.
NEWS
March 24, 2006
RE YOUR RECENT editorial on the Delaware River dredging proposal: The only childish behavior is on the part of Gov. Rendell. He is holding the tollpayers' money hostage until New Jersey agrees to an incomplete plan to dredge (most of the toll-paying public comes from New Jersey). There is no evidence that dredging will cause a significant increase in business. Should there be an increase, chances are that it would benefit the record-profit-making oil companies. Why don't they pay for it?
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 18, 2014 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Vice President Biden toured a dredging barge at Penn's Landing on Thursday to show support for the project to deepen the Delaware River shipping channel. Biden, the latest high-profile politician to visit the region in recent days, was flanked by a phalanx of Pennsylvania Democrats - U.S. Sen. Robert P. Casey Jr., and U.S. Reps. Robert A. Brady and Chaka Fattah. Before delivering remarks on the ongoing deepening of the Delaware, Biden and the delegation were taken on a tour of the large barge by Brian Puckett, project manager for Great Lakes Dredging & Dock Co. The vessel's main feature, a dredging bucket that can haul as much as two dump trucks, immediately caught Biden's eye. "That's a hell of a bucket," the vice president said after walking a gangplank onto the ship.
NEWS
August 5, 2014 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Camden County officials have begun to explore the possibility of interim dredging to save a dying lake that is part of a cluster of Superfund sites. One scenario suggested by the county to paint maker Sherwin-Williams, which operated on the sites, is dredging Kirkwood Lake, removing contaminated and uncontaminated soil. Sherwin-Williams would reimburse the county for operations involving the contaminated soil, and the county and company would split overhead costs. A spokesman for Sherwin-Williams acknowledged receipt of a proposal from the county.
BUSINESS
March 7, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
With more than half of the Delaware River navigation channel now at or deeper than 45 feet, the dredging project that began in March 2010 is on target for completion in 2017. President Obama has proposed $35 million for the deepening of the Delaware in his 2015 fiscal year budget. About $20 million in federal money this year will be spent to deepen, from 40 to 45 feet, a stretch between the Ben Franklin and Walt Whitman Bridges and the southernmost 15 miles in the lower Delaware Bay. The lower channel contains sand, which will be used to build dunes and storm-damage protection at Broadkill Beach, said Ed Voigt, public affairs chief for the Army Corps of Engineers Philadelphia District.
NEWS
March 5, 2014
The demagoguery of politicians exploiting the 1981 murder of Philadelphia Police Officer Daniel Faulkner to score points toward their next election is blatant and sickening. Among them is Sen. Pat Toomey, who has joined those vigorously opposing the nomination of civil rights attorney Debo Adegbile to head the U.S. Justice Department's Civil Rights Division. It would be hard to find a better candidate for the position than Adegbile. But Toomey (R., Pa.), Philadelphia District Attorney Seth Williams, and others say he should be disqualified because he was the NAACP Legal Defense Fund's director of litigation when the organization advocated on behalf of Faulkner's killer, Mumia Abu-Jamal, during appeals of his conviction.
NEWS
December 4, 2013 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Peters Creek is turning into the swamp it's always wanted to be. Owned by the blue-collar Camden County boroughs of Audubon Park and Oaklyn, this placid waterway meanders between them for less than a mile before flowing into the Newton Creek near the Black Horse Pike. Peters Creek was dredged and, in effect, widened decades ago. But like the Newton, which also has been altered, the stream bed is inexorably filling with sediment. This marshification has yielded bumper crops of spatterdock and other aquatic plants, a development local environmentalists are inclined to accept and at least some nearby residents . . . aren't.
NEWS
November 26, 2013 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAMDEN COUNTY To the delight of the rowing community, dredging of the Cooper River - now home to a number of national and collegiate rowing championships - is expected to begin in early 2014. The project should be completed within a year, in time for most of the 2015 rowing season, county officials said. The 2014 season will be severely disrupted. Dredging "was contemplated about five years ago, but we did not know then what we were going to do," Camden County Freeholder Jeffrey L. Nash, liaison to the county Parks Department, said on Friday.
NEWS
July 13, 2013
The U.S. House of Representatives Wednesday passed an Energy & Water Appropriations bill that included $19 million in federal funding for continued deepening of the Delaware River navigation channel. President Obama allocated $20 million for the project in his upcoming 2014 fiscal year budget. A spokesman for U.S. Rep. Patrick Meehan (R., Pa.) said that the $1 million difference between $19 appropriated in the legislation and $20 million in the President's budget represented a 5 percent across-the-board cut due to the federal sequester.
BUSINESS
June 21, 2013 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
With the completion of dredging last month of a 14-mile stretch of the Delaware River, the deepening of the river's main navigation channel to attract bigger ships and commerce is now about 60 percent complete, Philadelphia port officials said Wednesday. Since the project began in March 2010 between Camden and the Atlantic Ocean, 42 miles of the Delaware has been dredged to 45 feet, from 40 feet. Roughly 35 miles of channel is at, or below, 45 feet naturally, leaving about 25 miles of the 102-mile river channel to go, said Lisa Magee, engineer and director of special projects at Philadelphia Regional Port Authority (PRPA)
NEWS
June 20, 2013 | By Linda Loyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With the completion of dredging last month of a 14-mile stretch of the Delaware River, the deepening of the river's main navigation channel to attract bigger ships and commerce is now about 60 percent complete, Philadelphia port officials said Wednesday. Since the project began in March 2010 between Camden and the Atlantic Ocean, 42 miles of the Delaware has been dredged to 45 feet, from 40 feet. Roughly 35 miles of channel is at, or below, 45 feet naturally, leaving about 25 miles of the 102-mile river channel to go, said Lisa Magee, engineer and director of special projects at Philadelphia Regional Port Authority (PRPA)
BUSINESS
August 9, 2012 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was a lovefest among Pennsylvania elected officials, Democrat and Republican, on the banks of the Delaware River on Tuesday. Gov. Corbett and labor, business, and government leaders gathered at Packer Avenue Marine Terminal in South Philadelphia to celebrate the continued deepening of the Delaware River's 103-mile main shipping channel that began in March 2010. The remaining legal challenge to the project, by New Jersey and some environmental groups, was tossed out by a federal appeals court last month.
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