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Dredging

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NEWS
January 26, 2006
RE THE RECENT letter "Make N.J. pay in dredging dispute": Great, the writer agrees with Gov. Rendell that he should shut down the PATCO high-speed rail line and the bridges in order to force us into submission. Very, very neighborly of you. Maybe you can extend an even more neighborly gesture by agreeing to have some of that sludge dumped in YOUR backyard. Just so you know, and living way out there in Harrisburg you might not, but Pennsylvanians use those bridges and that train as well.
NEWS
July 10, 2006
DEAR GOV. Corzine: I represent a substantial portion of the area along the Delaware River, including Tioga Marine Terminal. I believe as you do that our ports are crucial to the economic futures of Pennsylvania and New Jersey. I urge you to help break the deadlock over the Delaware River dredging issue. Dredging to 45 feet will allow ports to accommodate larger ships and compete with ports in other sections of the United States. Failure to dredge will force companies to move to other ports.
BUSINESS
January 28, 1999 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Plans for dredging a deeper shipping channel in the Delaware River - touted as a key to a competitive Philadelphia port - are under fire from environmentalists, who yesterday called the $300 million project a waste of money and "environmental roulette. " "This project is going to contaminate our water with toxins like mercury, lead and PCBs. It's going to threaten our drinking water," said Maya K. van Rossum, of the Delaware Riverkeeper Network, at a rally near City Hall. "Dredge No More, Army Corps," chanted 15 members of the Alliance to Dump the Delaware Deepening Project outside the Wanamaker Building headquarters of the Army Corps of Engineers.
NEWS
January 30, 2006
IN HIS LETTER responding to my stance on the dredging issue, Rick Bauer forgets to mention that Pennsylvania has agreed to take 75 percent of the sludge from the project. That is more than a fair amount for a project that would benefit both sides of the river. The last time I checked, both states have ports. While accusing me of being "unneighborly," he fails to take into consideration that New Jersey reneged on a promise to Pennsylvania. Apparently he thinks that Pennsylvania should just accept the inexcusable conduct of the Garden State.
NEWS
October 1, 1999 | BY DENNIS ROCHFORD
Pay dirt. That's the type of dirt this region will see when the dredging of the Delaware River main channel to 45 feet is completed. Each day, the Delaware River provides ships laden with myriad products access to the region's front doors. With a deeper channel and the use of economies of scale, ships will be able to carry more cargo on the Delaware. Businesses and consumers will have access to additional products resulting in added business and prosperity for the region. But, as evidenced by your editorial (Sept.
BUSINESS
October 3, 2009 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In what could be another blow to the long-delayed deepening of the Delaware River, U.S. House and Senate budget negotiators have restricted an annual federal appropriation for the project, seen as a boon to the region's economy and ports. But Sen. Arlen Specter (D., Pa.) and Pennsylvania port officials said yesterday that the measure would not block the dredging from the current 40 feet to 45 feet once the Army Corps of Engineers decides to begin. The appropriations bill still must be approved by the full House and Senate.
NEWS
August 13, 1999 | BY DENNIS ROCHFORD
W. Russell G. Byers (column, July 27) was correct to state that dredging the Delaware River was potentially a "fabulous idea. " From the standpoint of the benefits it will bring to residents, communities and businesses, there are not three problems, there is only one: Byers' belief that this project might be a fabulous idea. A 45-foot main channel will be a boon to businesses and residents alike. The business perspective is simple to grasp. A deeper channel means more cargo can be carried on one ship.
BUSINESS
April 16, 2010 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Federal agents seized boxes and documents this week from two Hazleton area companies with contracts to transport dredge material from a Navy pier on the Schuylkill in Philadelphia. Authorities, including agents from the FBI's Scranton office, raided offices of Fort Mifflin Reclamation Associates Inc. in Kingston near Wilkes Barre, and Hazleton Creek Properties L.L.C., Hazleton, on Tuesday. Fort Mifflin Reclamation won a $21 million contract in 2006 from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to haul 500,000 cubic yards of sediment to Hazleton as fill for abandoned mines, said Corps spokeswoman Sarah Rivette.
NEWS
January 11, 1989 | By Rita M. Sutter, Special to The Inquirer
Here is a tale of coincidence and miscommunication that cost the township of Mount Holly money and aggravation. Last year, Mount Holly officials noted that the water in the Rancocas Creek, as it runs through the county seat, was no longer actually flowing but slowly choking through a waterway obstructed with a tenacious garble of muck, natural detritus, rusted shopping carts and automobile tires. In December 1987, the council decided to use $150,000 of a $300,000 Small Cities Grant - available through the Community Development Block Grant administered by the state for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development - to dredge an "unsightly" half-mile stretch of the Rancocas Creek.
NEWS
February 12, 2016 | By David O'Reilly, Staff Writer
A bitter wind was snapping flags and rippling the Cooper River on Wednesday as Jamie Stack strode the snow-clad riverbank toward a chain-link fence. "Out of the west. This is a typical wind," said Stack, head coach of the South Jersey Rowing Club and manager of the Camden County Boathouse. Straight, narrow, and scenic, the Cooper has for decades been a destination for national and collegiate rowing championships and home to dozens of local teams. But an environmentally sensitive dredging operation launched in August to deepen its notoriously shallow racecourse is taking longer to complete than anticipated, county officials said this week.
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NEWS
August 12, 2016
ISSUE | SCHUYLKILL RIVER Slow rowing The Summer Olympic Games have begun, and Philadelphians are justifiably proud of local rowers who trained on our beautiful stretch of the Schuylkill River (From the Schuylkill to Rio," Aug. 3). Accumulating silt and the resulting weeds and debris along the rowing course, however, is threatening the long tradition of this iconic Philadelphia sport. Weed-whacking barges must clear the racecourse before regattas. The docks along Boathouse Row are mere inches above the waterline.
NEWS
July 28, 2016 | By David O'Reilly, Staff Writer
Nearly a year after a major dredging operation began shutting it down, boating on the Cooper River seemed back to normal Tuesday. Sailboats tacked into light breezes, a kayak skimmed along the Pennsauken shore, and three sleek shells packed with young rowers from Moorestown glided west. But shouts and a shrill whistle - even a waterborne visit from "law enforcement" - will greet any boater who gets close to that new line of white buoys stretched across the river. To its east lie the two miles of submerged pipes, suction equipment, and dredge boats of Camden County's $10.5 million channel-deepening operation, which resumed July 1 after a three-month pause.
NEWS
May 14, 2016 | By Aubrey Whelan, Staff Writer
Two weeks ago, Paul Laskow watched plumes of mud rise in the Schuylkill as rowers tried to push their boats off from the docks at Boathouse Row. Normally, the water surrounding the docks is six feet deep. But these days, outside some boathouses, Laskow says, you can sit on the dock, put your hand in the water, and touch the river bottom. Sediment buildup caused by the Schuylkill's various dams has long been a problem along Boathouse Row and the racecourses just upriver. With the annual Dad Vail Regatta getting underway Friday, the river is long overdue for a dredging, said Laskow, who runs the river restoration committee of the Schuylkill Navy, the governing body of Boathouse Row. Funds to dredge the river, however, are hard to come by. Laskow and his committee have been working for three years to get a dredging barge up the Schuylkill.
NEWS
April 30, 2016 | By Melanie Burney, Staff Writer
The spectacular view of the Cooper River remains the same at the new Cooper House restaurant, while the place has been given a complete makeover and new menu. More than a year after upgrades began to spruce up the once-popular Lobster Trap, the restaurant is only weeks away from opening. Besides its new name, the restaurant, closed since 2013, will have a new lease when it officially opens June 5. The building is owned by Camden County. There will be no TVs or stools at the bar, which will offer locally brewed beer and wines from South Jersey.
NEWS
April 27, 2016 | By David O'Reilly, Staff Writer
Two environmental groups announced Monday that they are suing the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection and Department of Transportation to try to block creation of a 26-acre dredge disposal site on Barnegat Bay. Environment New Jersey, the New Jersey Conservation Foundation, and a coalition of homeowners near the proposed site said they are challenging the DEP for allowing the transportation agency to develop the property without proper...
NEWS
April 9, 2016 | By Rita Giordano, Staff Writer
A soon-to-be released report commissioned by Camden County is expected to bring greater potency to residents' and county officials' demands for the dredging of Kirkwood Lake. The report by Sadat Associates will claim that contamination from the upstream Superfund site is entering the lake and passing downstream to the Cooper River, according to Emery Coppola Jr. of Sadat. It will also say the lake is threatened without dredging. Preliminary findings of the report were discussed at a public meeting Thursday night at Voorhees Town Center.
NEWS
March 8, 2016 | By David O'Reilly, Staff Writer
A dredging operation on the Cooper River is taking longer than expected, Camden County officials say, and rowing teams likely will not be allowed on the water before May 1, disrupting the practice schedules of hundreds of rowers. A May start would be two months later than the county told a meeting of coaches in early February, and not what the Haddon Township Crew Club imagined as members towed their floating docks into place on Feb. 21. "My expectation was that we'd be starting practices out there two days ago," Haddon's visibly disappointed head coach, Gregg Francis, said Thursday on learning of the delay.
NEWS
February 12, 2016 | By David O'Reilly, Staff Writer
A bitter wind was snapping flags and rippling the Cooper River on Wednesday as Jamie Stack strode the snow-clad riverbank toward a chain-link fence. "Out of the west. This is a typical wind," said Stack, head coach of the South Jersey Rowing Club and manager of the Camden County Boathouse. Straight, narrow, and scenic, the Cooper has for decades been a destination for national and collegiate rowing championships and home to dozens of local teams. But an environmentally sensitive dredging operation launched in August to deepen its notoriously shallow racecourse is taking longer to complete than anticipated, county officials said this week.
NEWS
September 21, 2015 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
These days, only a strong breeze ruffles the Cooper River where rowers, sailors, and water enthusiasts once thrived. Activity has been suspended on the bustling Camden County waterway in the latest Cooper River Park improvement phase, which includes dredging. The project is expected to be completed by spring and drastically change the landscape and add new amenities around the popular 374-acre attraction. Work is underway on a new restaurant to be operated by a celebrity chef and other changes that officials hope will draw more visitors to an area that already pumps millions into the local economy.
NEWS
October 18, 2014 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Vice President Biden toured a dredging barge at Penn's Landing on Thursday to show support for the project to deepen the Delaware River shipping channel. Biden, the latest high-profile politician to visit the region in recent days, was flanked by a phalanx of Pennsylvania Democrats - U.S. Sen. Robert P. Casey Jr., and U.S. Reps. Robert A. Brady and Chaka Fattah. Before delivering remarks on the ongoing deepening of the Delaware, Biden and the delegation were taken on a tour of the large barge by Brian Puckett, project manager for Great Lakes Dredging & Dock Co. The vessel's main feature, a dredging bucket that can haul as much as two dump trucks, immediately caught Biden's eye. "That's a hell of a bucket," the vice president said after walking a gangplank onto the ship.
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