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Dress Code

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NEWS
May 15, 1986 | By Kim Zimmermann, Special to The Inquirer
Rising temperatures have given rise to a debate about the dress code at the Pitman Middle School. About 15 parents who attended a board of education meeting Tuesday night complained that their daughters and sons had been sent to the principal's office the previous week for wearing inappropriate clothing. School Superintendent William B. Horton said 12 students were sent to the office on May 7, when temperatures soared near 90, for wearing jams - a type of short pants - and other clothing that their teachers considered inappropriate for school.
NEWS
December 28, 2006 | By Will Hobson FOR THE INQUIRER
If you're a student in the West Chester Area School District and you're partial to sporting pajamas at school, you may soon be out of luck. An updated dress and grooming policy is in the works, and may be passed by the West Chester School Board by the end of January. Pajama-loving kids of West Chester, board member Joe Green feels your pain, but he's definitely in the minority. Green was outvoted, 8-1, by his fellow board members when they approved the first reading of the updated code at a meeting Dec. 18. The updated dress code outlaws tank tops, pajamas, shorts or pants with writing in inappropriate places, and inappropriately tight clothing of any kind.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2011 | By Mark Olsen, THE LOS ANGELES TIMES
When the end of the world comes, would you really want to be in a sleazy Russian nightclub? That's one of the essential questions pondered in The Darkest Hour, in which aliens invade the planet, and a small group of attractive young people fight to survive and make their way elsewhere. As the film opens, two American Web entrepreneurs (Emile Hirsch, Max Minghella) are heading to Moscow looking for financing for their location-based social-media service. After they are double-crossed by a would-be business partner (Joel Kinnaman)
NEWS
October 6, 2007
I'VE BEEN a faithful reader of Jenice Armstrong's column since returning to the area after retiring last year. I enjoy the way she puts issues out in such a professional manner. I'm writing about her Sept. 26 column on the "b-word. " My comment isn't about that, but writer Jake Johnson's comment on big women wearing tight jeans. I worked in an office with men and women, white and black. The men were always commenting on the big-butt women wearing pants suits or just pants so that it brought out their biggest feature.
NEWS
March 2, 1988 | By William J. Beerman, Special to The Inquirer
High school students in Haddon Heights have persuaded the school board to vote for a new dress code that is stricter - that's right, stricter - than the old code. A committee of students has rewritten the old code, outlawing several items of apparel not previously on the forbidden list. Among the newly banned items are shirts of the "Spuds MacKenzie, Party Animal" beer-advertisement variety. Also banned are shirts and sweaters that expose shoulders and underarms. The students added a new requirement that skirt hemlines be at least two inches below a girl's fingertips.
NEWS
November 4, 2001 | By Louise Harbach INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
At Burlington County Institute of Technology, the district's new dress code is keyed to the school colors of the two campuses. At the Westampton campus, students may wear shirts of blue, white and gray, while at the Medford campus, the colors may be red, white and blue. In addition, students at both campuses may choose from skirts, slacks or Bermuda shorts in khaki or blue. Boys may select collared shirts in long or short sleeves while girls may choose either collared shirts or Henley tops.
NEWS
November 24, 1987 | By Roy Seneca, Special to The Inquirer
The Burlington Township Board of Education gave preliminary approval last night to a dress code that would prohibit students in grades five through 12 from wearing shorts to classes, except when given permission by the school superintendent. The policy states that during "infrequent cases of extremely hot or humid weather, the superintendent or his designee shall advise the middle and high school principals that shorts of reasonable length and fit will be permitted on the following school day. " Board President Patricia Wexler said the dress code was a compromise from an original proposal that would have prohibited students at all grade levels from wearing shorts at any time.
NEWS
March 25, 1987 | By Janet Perrella, Special to The Inquirer
The Maple Shade school board last night approved a more stringent dress code for high school students that bans revealing, torn or tight-fitting clothing and, if strictly interpreted, hats. Under the policy, any student violating the dress code will be sent home to change, and repeat offenders may be suspended. Superintendent John Sherry said he thought the dress code had needed "some clarification" after he noticed several students last year wearing "shirts too tight and shorts too short.
NEWS
June 11, 1996 | by Marisol Bello, Daily News Staff Writer
Leave the $100-plus Northlake Gore-tex hiking boots at home. And the $500 quilted down Bear coat. And maybe even the Tommy Hilfiger shirt and pants. That gear may keep you out of school next year if the district adopts a mandatory dress code that prohibits students from wearing expensive designer clothes and jewelry. The school board was urged yesterday to do just that by a dress-code committee made up of administrators, parent leaders and union heads. Each school currently has its own voluntary dress code.
NEWS
May 21, 1986 | By Maureen Graham, Special to The Inquirer
The Monroe Township Board of Education last night empowered the school superintendent to revise the school dress code on a day-to-day basis after 75 students complained that a 10-year-old policy prohibiting them from wearing shorts to school was "outdated and impractical. " But Superintendent Benjamin Timberman said any changes would be limited to "exceptionally hot" school days. The students, mostly juniors and seniors from Williamstown High School, told the board that temperatures in their school, which has no air conditioning, rose to 90 degrees this week.
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SPORTS
February 7, 2015 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
Evander Kane, the speedy but enigmatic Winnipeg left winger who has drawn trade attention from the Flyers in recent seasons, could be on the block after his latest controversy with the Jets. If healthy, the 6-foot-2, 198-pound Kane would fit nicely on the Flyers' top line, alongside all-stars Claude Giroux and Jake Voracek. He was placed on the injured reserve list Thursday and will miss at least the next two games with an undisclosed injury. On Tuesday in a 3-2 overtime loss to Vancouver, Kane was a healthy scratch because he wore a track suit to a team meeting instead of a suit, a violation of the club's dress code, according to the Winnipeg Free Press.
NEWS
May 31, 2013 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
WILDWOOD - At Beachwear Fashions, a boardwalk shop in this honky-tonk by the sea, even the mannequins can't keep their pants on straight. Tiny short-shorts for girls and baggy sweats for guys are displayed pulled halfway down plastic derrieres. The fashions are decorated on the rear with pithy phrases like YOLO (you only live once) and Beach Barbie. You can think of it as art imitating life. But next month, this Jersey Shore town that has been trying for decades to combat its boozy, free-for-all image is likely to impose a boardwalk dress code that will turn into law the silent wish of many that other people hike up their pants.
NEWS
May 19, 2013 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
John Doerffel never thought his clothes would land him in the internal suspension room for a half-day, but that's what happened to the William Tennent High School senior this week. On Wednesday, Doerffel, 19, was wearing a black T-shirt he said he had worn to the Warminster school dozens of times. On the back, it has a picture of an M-16 rifle surrounded by barbed wire, bullets, and the words "Peace Through Superior Firepower. " Doerffel, who plans to join the Marines after graduation, said an assistant principal told him the shirt violated the school's dress code.
NEWS
February 26, 2013 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Through pure luck and timing, a middle-aged couple from Lancaster County scored arguably the best spot on the East Coast for viewing the Oscars on Sunday night. At 5:30 p.m., after driving in from Gap on a whim, Joanne Larkin, a teacher, and her husband, Gerard, who works for Verizon, waltzed into the Llanerch Diner and claimed The Booth. That now-famed square footage where Bradley Cooper and Jennifer Lawrence had a non-date over a bowl of Raisin Bran in Silver Linings Playbook . "My friend made me promise I'd kiss the spot where Bradley Cooper sat," Joanne Larkin said, "so I did. " Yuk. "Actually," she confessed, "I just kissed my fingers and touched the seat.
NEWS
February 21, 2013
CALL IT dashiki-gate. I'm referring to what happened last week when a black member of the Pennsylvania House of Representatives attempted to address the body while dressed in Afro-centric attire. Rep. W. Curtis Thomas, D-North Philadelphia, had donned a kufi cap and a striking blue flowing garment with gold embroidery Feb. 13 in anticipation of the House's annual Black History Month celebration later that day. As House protocol requires, Thomas approached the microphone and waited to be recognized by Rep. Karen Boback, R-Columbia County, who was standing in for House Speaker Sam Smith.
NEWS
January 19, 2013 | By Seymour I. "Spence" Toll
While thinning out a bloated file cabinet in my study recently, I came across a totally obscure and unintentionally prophetic piece I had written in 1973. It was about how Philadelphia lawyers dressed for work. At the time, I was the editor of a new weekly tabloid that the Philadelphia Bar Association published and distributed to all members. I occasionally wrote lighthearted editorials for the paper, called the Retainer. An example was that piece I found, headlined "Cut the Noose!"
NEWS
January 1, 2013
By Ed Bengtson and Robert Maranto After tragedy comes reaction. Sometimes, the reaction amounts to a second tragedy. Public schools in safe neighborhoods now have a police presence. Classes have had duck-and-cover drills for what to do if a "bad guy" enters. Normally sensible people talk about guards, walls, and metal detectors. Schools have become, at least for the moment, unfriendly to parent volunteers, as if public schools need less rather than more parent involvement.
SPORTS
October 27, 2012 | Associated Press
NEW YORK - David Stern spent nearly 30 years growing the NBA, turning a league that couldn't even get its championship series on live prime-time TV into a projected $5 billion-a-year industry. Confident the NBA is in good shape and certain he has found someone who can make it even better, Stern is ready to end one of the most successful and impactful careers in sports history. Stern, 70, will retire as commissioner Feb. 1, 2014, 30 years to the day after taking charge of the league, and be replaced by deputy commissioner Adam Silver.
SPORTS
October 26, 2012 | Daily News Wire Reports
DAVID STERN spent nearly 30 years growing the NBA, turning a league that couldn't even get its championship series on live prime-time TV into a projected $5 billion-a-year industry. Confident the NBA is in good shape and certain he has found someone who can make it even better, Stern is ready to end one of the most successful and impactful careers in sports history. Stern will retire as commissioner Feb. 1, 2014, 30 years to the day after taking charge of the league, and be replaced by deputy commissioner Adam Silver.
NEWS
August 22, 2012
It's good to see the Philadelphia school system adopt a new code of conduct that gives principals more flexibility in deciding how discipline is meted out to unruly students. But the plan will be meaningless unless officials apply the new policy fairly and evenly across the board to change a school culture in which violence has been an everyday occurrence. The new policy is the most extensive set of revisions to the student rules in years, and was long overdue. The old, one-size-fits-all method was not working to keep kids or teachers safe.
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