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Dress Shoes

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SPORTS
July 21, 2012 | By Chad Graff, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ryan Howard swapped his pinstriped No. 6 jersey for an apron and his size-15 red cleats for dress shoes. The Phillies first baseman was wearing a white button-down shirt and black slacks while serving dinner to autograph-seeking guests as part of the Celebrity Servers Series at Morton's the Steakhouse in Center City on Thursday night. Teammate Jimmy Rollins was serving as his supervisor, checking in on tables. "This is great, man, just to be out here for a good cause," Howard said before answering questions about the Phillies.
LIVING
January 24, 1997 | By Paddy Noyes, FOR THE INQUIRER
There is always something to be amused about when a staff parent is describing Gregory, 9. A worker at the group home was going down the hall, singing operatic phrases. And here comes Gregory, trailing him, singing, too! It didn't sound quite the same, but it was a valiant attempt. One night Gregory was supposed to be getting ready for bed. He wasn't sleepy, so he put on his "dress" shoes and started tap dancing. It's hard for any on the staff to keep a straight face when Gregory is breaking the rules like that, but seven other children were sleepy, so he had to put off his dancing until morning.
BUSINESS
February 1, 1994 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
You say a physician has diagnosed that pain in your hands as carpal tunnel syndrome and believes your job is to blame? File a worker's compensation insurance claim, advised Joseph Lurie, a Philadelphia attorney. You can and should do that, he said, even if you are not losing time from work. "Workers who wait to file a claim until the problem becomes so severe they can't work, may find they are no longer entitled to collect worker compensation benefits," said Lurie, a partner in the law firm of Galfand, Berger, Lurie, Brighanm & March.
FOOD
September 9, 1992 | by Polly Fisher, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: Ladies' nylons have a tendency to dry out, which causes runs. Wash them delicately with shampoo, then rinse with cool water. But don't forget to add the conditioner - just like for human hair fibers! Fill the sink with warm water to open up the fibers, mix in a little conditioner, let soak 5 minutes, then rinse. You will find your nylons not only last longer but feel so smooth on your legs! - Mrs. S.J.W. Dear Polly: The best solution I've found for separating coffee filters: Take a full pack and flip them over.
NEWS
March 14, 2004 | By Ken Dilanian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ali Fuleih makes shoes that almost nobody wants to buy anymore. Fuleih is paid about $150 a month in one of the four factories that are part of the Iraq State Company for Leather Industries, a government-owned dinosaur that employs more than 2,800 people. On a recent workday, many of those employees were milling aimlessly around the administrative offices. But Fuleih was on the factory floor, proudly showing a visitor how he forms the shoe leather around the sole using a low-tech, 30-year-old machine.
NEWS
June 8, 2011
James Power, 82, of Springfield, Delaware County, a retired Lansdowne postmaster, died of cancer Friday, June 3, at home. Mr. Power walked almost a mile to work in a suit and tie and sneakers, and changed to dress shoes at the post office. He also walked home for lunch and back home at the end of the day. After he retired, he walked from 18 to 21 miles a day. "I just like to walk. It makes me feel good," he told Inquirer columnist Tom Fox in 1984. Mr. Power grew up with eight siblings in Lansdowne.
LIVING
December 29, 1999 | By Dianna Marder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Got stuff? The gifts are unwrapped, and the house seems more cluttered than ever. Now's the time to look around and see what you can donate to charity. Sure, most agencies really want shiny, new things. And they'd love the donation of your time, energy and dollars. But there are local charities that need your old handbags, used toothbrushes, frayed towels, neckties, plastic supermarket bags - even your rags. Here are a few of the organizations that need specific items you might find around the house.
BUSINESS
March 3, 1999 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jones Apparel Group may be adding the largest U.S. maker of women's dress shoes to its wardrobe of companies. Trading of both Jones New York and Nine West Group was halted shortly before 2 p.m. yesterday on rumors of the acquisition. Jones, based in Bristol, Bucks County, may buy Nine West for $27 a share - or about $917.6 million - according to a CNBC report given yesterday without citing sources. Nine West's stock has risen 30 percent in the last two weeks on the strength of the rumor as it was reported in Women's Wear Daily.
SPORTS
June 4, 1987 | By PAUL HAGEN, Daily News Sports Writer
Bruce Ruffin was on the mound at Candlestick Park yesterday afternoon, and he was frankly surprised at what he saw: Manager John Felske walking from the dugout to take him out of the game. There was one out in the fourth. Two San Francisco Giants runs were in, there were runners on first and second. Ruffin had given up four consecutive hits, eight for the game, and had gone 2-0 to Matt Williams. "The hits were not monster hits. They were not exactly monster hits," Ruffin noted, correctly.
NEWS
January 21, 2009
RE "A TRIBUTE to Al, the Shoeshine Man," by staff writer Dafney Tales: Only the Daily News would have the cred and the heart to profile the soul of a small but truly significant part of Philly. I'm writing to memorialize Al "the shoeshine man," who sat outside on his handmade combination shoeshine box and seat at the corner of Leithgow and South (between 4th and 5th), snapping his felt shoeshine rag two-handed, simultaneously brushing a shoe's left and right sides, a talent I tried to mimic when my son was old enough to own dress shoes, but still young enough to let me shine them.
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SPORTS
July 21, 2012 | By Chad Graff, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ryan Howard swapped his pinstriped No. 6 jersey for an apron and his size-15 red cleats for dress shoes. The Phillies first baseman was wearing a white button-down shirt and black slacks while serving dinner to autograph-seeking guests as part of the Celebrity Servers Series at Morton's the Steakhouse in Center City on Thursday night. Teammate Jimmy Rollins was serving as his supervisor, checking in on tables. "This is great, man, just to be out here for a good cause," Howard said before answering questions about the Phillies.
NEWS
June 29, 2011 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
The buzzword in footwear these days is "barefoot. " Shoes as minimal as ballet slippers - and shoes with fat two-inch soles - claim to be healthy for you because they're like going barefoot. While there are studies that support some of the purported benefits, there is also "a lot of hype," says Kendrick Whitney, a professor of podiatry and orthopedics at Temple University. "And you have people thinking, 'I'm just going to lace up these shoes and get the same workout as going to a gym,' " he said.
NEWS
June 8, 2011
James Power, 82, of Springfield, Delaware County, a retired Lansdowne postmaster, died of cancer Friday, June 3, at home. Mr. Power walked almost a mile to work in a suit and tie and sneakers, and changed to dress shoes at the post office. He also walked home for lunch and back home at the end of the day. After he retired, he walked from 18 to 21 miles a day. "I just like to walk. It makes me feel good," he told Inquirer columnist Tom Fox in 1984. Mr. Power grew up with eight siblings in Lansdowne.
NEWS
January 21, 2009
RE "A TRIBUTE to Al, the Shoeshine Man," by staff writer Dafney Tales: Only the Daily News would have the cred and the heart to profile the soul of a small but truly significant part of Philly. I'm writing to memorialize Al "the shoeshine man," who sat outside on his handmade combination shoeshine box and seat at the corner of Leithgow and South (between 4th and 5th), snapping his felt shoeshine rag two-handed, simultaneously brushing a shoe's left and right sides, a talent I tried to mimic when my son was old enough to own dress shoes, but still young enough to let me shine them.
NEWS
February 12, 2006 | By Jennifer Moroz INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Some of what you are about to read is going to sound mean. But we're talking about dating, and it's a cruel world out there. Potential mates are crossed off lists for a lot of reasons, many of them small. Petty, even. Worthy of a Seinfeld episode. I've tried to be a bigger person. I've tried to ignore those little things that make me cringe. Give the guy a chance, I've told myself. Ride it out. But it's no use. There's a reason they're called deal-breakers. Here are some of mine.
NEWS
August 19, 2004 | By Terri Akman
As a 16-year-old about to enter his junior year in high school, our son was due to get a summer job. My husband and I sat him down, looked him in his "but-it's-summer-and-I-want-to-sleep-late" teenager eyes, and broke the news. We expected him to earn at least minimum wage (currently $5.15 an hour) and work about 24 hours each week. Beyond that, the world was his oyster. He carefully chose about a dozen places where he thought he'd like to work. He took on the task with vigor, even dressing the part.
NEWS
March 14, 2004 | By Ken Dilanian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ali Fuleih makes shoes that almost nobody wants to buy anymore. Fuleih is paid about $150 a month in one of the four factories that are part of the Iraq State Company for Leather Industries, a government-owned dinosaur that employs more than 2,800 people. On a recent workday, many of those employees were milling aimlessly around the administrative offices. But Fuleih was on the factory floor, proudly showing a visitor how he forms the shoe leather around the sole using a low-tech, 30-year-old machine.
LIVING
December 29, 1999 | By Dianna Marder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Got stuff? The gifts are unwrapped, and the house seems more cluttered than ever. Now's the time to look around and see what you can donate to charity. Sure, most agencies really want shiny, new things. And they'd love the donation of your time, energy and dollars. But there are local charities that need your old handbags, used toothbrushes, frayed towels, neckties, plastic supermarket bags - even your rags. Here are a few of the organizations that need specific items you might find around the house.
BUSINESS
March 3, 1999 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jones Apparel Group may be adding the largest U.S. maker of women's dress shoes to its wardrobe of companies. Trading of both Jones New York and Nine West Group was halted shortly before 2 p.m. yesterday on rumors of the acquisition. Jones, based in Bristol, Bucks County, may buy Nine West for $27 a share - or about $917.6 million - according to a CNBC report given yesterday without citing sources. Nine West's stock has risen 30 percent in the last two weeks on the strength of the rumor as it was reported in Women's Wear Daily.
LIVING
January 24, 1997 | By Paddy Noyes, FOR THE INQUIRER
There is always something to be amused about when a staff parent is describing Gregory, 9. A worker at the group home was going down the hall, singing operatic phrases. And here comes Gregory, trailing him, singing, too! It didn't sound quite the same, but it was a valiant attempt. One night Gregory was supposed to be getting ready for bed. He wasn't sleepy, so he put on his "dress" shoes and started tap dancing. It's hard for any on the staff to keep a straight face when Gregory is breaking the rules like that, but seven other children were sleepy, so he had to put off his dancing until morning.
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