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SPORTS
February 21, 1994 | By Tim Panaccio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
He was told when the season began not to even bother coming out for the team. He decided to walk on, anyway. No one gave him much of a chance, least of all Drexel, which didn't even list him on its preseason roster. So yesterday was sweet redemption for Chris Kohles. The 6-foot-6 junior forward from Abington High picked up a crucial offensive rebound and scored what proved to be the winning basket as Drexel beat Northeastern, 71-64, to go 20-3 overall, 10-1 in the North Atlantic Conference.
SPORTS
August 21, 2014 | By John N. Mitchell, Inquirer Staff Writer
The next time the Drexel men's basketball team boards a bus to Newark, N.J., it won't be to play Seton Hall. This Saturday, the Dragons are headed to Newark International Airport to embark on a 10-day trip to China, returning on Sept. 3. Along the way they will play four games - two against professionals and two against club teams - before returning home. They will visit Shanghai and Beijing "It's a great experience for us, as a team and as people," Drexel coach Bruiser Flint said.
SPORTS
November 14, 2007
Who: Drexel (2-0) at Florida Gulf Coast (1-0) When: 7 o'clock Where: Alico Arena, Fort Myers, Fla. TV/Radio: None/WNTP (990-AM) Note: This is Florida Gulf Coast's first home game since moving up to Division I. The Eagles are 80-11 all time at Alico Arena.
SPORTS
April 10, 1994 | By Mayer Brandschain, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Drexel's unbeaten varsity eight won its third race of the season at yesterday's sixth annual La Salle University Invitational Regatta. Boats from 22 schools participated on the Cooper River in Camden County Park. Drexel, coached by Steve Orova and victorious over George Washington and St. Joseph's in previous regattas, stroked powerfully over the 2,000-meter course to win in 6 minutes, 12.1 seconds, in a cold, sharp crosswind. Bucknell was many lengths back in second place and later triumphed in the women's varsity eight.
SPORTS
February 21, 1998 | By Marc Narducci, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Delran's Christine Kasprzak, a three-year starting midfielder, will play her college soccer at Drexel. Kasprzak signed a letter of intent with Drexel on Thursday evening. She was a first-team all-Burlington County Liberty Division selection last fall, when the Bears went 17-3-2 and were ranked fifth in South Jersey by The Inquirer. An unsung midfielder also known for her defensive skill, Kasprzak scored six goals as a senior. Kasprzak said she received a partial academic and a partial soccer scholarship.
SPORTS
January 20, 2012
TYLER HALE AND Kamile Nacickaite scored 14 points apiece to lead Drexel in a 66-39 rout of Northeastern in women's basketball action at the Daskalaskis Athletic Center last night. Hollie Mershon added 13 points as Drexel (9-7, 5-1 CAA) led by as much as 30 and had 15 points contributed off the bench. Deanna Kerkhof and Jamie Conroy each scored 12 to lead Northeastern (3-14, 1-5).  
SPORTS
February 5, 2010
Drexel will travel to Bradley on Feb. 20, during the NCAA's Bracketbuster Weekend. The game, scheduled for 7 p.m., is considered an official Bracketbuster contest since it will not be televised. The event provides programs from 14 participating conferences, a chance to face top nonconference opponents about three weeks before Selection Sunday. Drexel and Bradley will have to win their respective conference tournaments to reach the NCAA tournament. Drexel is 13-11, while Bradley is 11-11.
SPORTS
January 18, 2004 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Tim Whitworth led Drexel to an 80-76 victory over William and Mary in a seesaw Colonial Athletic Association game last night. Whitworth, a graduate of Chestnut Hill Academy, scored 22 of his 30 points in the second half. That included a three-pointer that broke a 74-74 tie with 29 seconds left. Drexel (8-6, 3-2 Colonial) and William and Mary (4-11, 1-5) followed a roundabout route to that tie. William and Mary had led by as much as 11 in the first half. Drexel, which trailed by 38-35 at halftime, led by as much as 14 in the second half.
SPORTS
April 17, 2001 | By Marc Narducci INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Delsea forward Kate Kane, considered among the fastest soccer players in South Jersey, has signed with Drexel. Kane earned a partial academic and soccer scholarship. She became the second South Jersey player this season to commit to Drexel. In the fall, Paul VI defender Noel Niederkorn also made a commitment to Drexel. Kane and Niederkorn, who are teammates for the Medford Strikers, will be roommates at Drexel. "I originally had it narrowed down to Delaware and St. Joe's," Kane said yesterday.
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NEWS
August 25, 2014
W AN AND Wei-Heng Shih, both 60, of Bryn Mawr, are co-founders of Lenima Field Diagnostics. Both are professors at Drexel and are developing piezoelectric-sensor technology that can detect a germ that causes diarrhea and is primarily responsible for 14,000 deaths in the U.S. each year, says the CDC. I spoke with Wan Shih. Q: How did you come up with the idea for this technology? A: We have a long history on working with piezoelectric materials that started in the 1990s.
SPORTS
August 21, 2014 | By John N. Mitchell, Inquirer Staff Writer
The next time the Drexel men's basketball team boards a bus to Newark, N.J., it won't be to play Seton Hall. This Saturday, the Dragons are headed to Newark International Airport to embark on a 10-day trip to China, returning on Sept. 3. Along the way they will play four games - two against professionals and two against club teams - before returning home. They will visit Shanghai and Beijing "It's a great experience for us, as a team and as people," Drexel coach Bruiser Flint said.
NEWS
August 18, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the poor, food is not only scarce, it's often rotten and germ-ridden. Corner stores and small supermarkets that feed vast swaths of impoverished Philadelphia offer bacteria-laced foods in unhealthy conditions that can lead to foodborne illness, a Drexel University study shows. Customers vouch for the science. "Potatoes and baby food are moldy, lettuce is rotten, and the mice are having a good time in boxes of noodles," said Rodney Jenkins, 47, an unemployed North Philadelphia man. "I ate bad fruit from a corner store and got sick.
NEWS
August 18, 2014 | By Meeri Kim, For The Inquirer
Behind a glass wall in Drexel University's ExCITe Center, a fully pregnant mannequin stands tall with nothing on but a strip of knitted blue fabric around its bulging stomach. The garment, called a belly band, isn't the latest trend in maternity wear; it's an all-knit, wireless fetal monitor. Drexel's Shima Seiki Haute Technology Laboratory creates smart garments with electronic circuitry knitted right in. So instead of a boxy device on your wrist or around your waist, the clothes themselves become a monitor that is flexible, comfortable, and soft.
NEWS
August 18, 2014 | By Rachel Zamzow, Inquirer Staff Writer
Like many new relationships, this one developed over a cup of coffee. Except this one might lead to a new drug to inhibit the spread of cancer cells. Joseph M. Salvino, a medicinal chemist, and Alessandro Fatatis, a cancer biologist, crossed paths in spring 2010 at a departmental meeting at the Drexel University College of Medicine. Fatatis presented his recent discovery that breast and prostate cancer cells possess a receptor that allows them to infiltrate the bone, often the first site of metastasis for these cancers.
NEWS
August 16, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Albert H. Laverson, 94, formerly of Haddonfield, a Drexel University tennis and soccer coach who was inducted into the school's Athletics Hall of Fame in 1996, died on Saturday, Aug. 2, at Lions Gate, the continuing care retirement community in Voorhees. At Drexel, Mr. Laverson was the men's head tennis coach for 32 years and men's assistant soccer coach for 43 years. Mr. Laverson was named in 2006 to the Philadelphia Jewish Sports Hall of Fame for his soccer accomplishments. Mr. Laverson grew up in the Strawberry Mansion and Brewerytown neighborhoods and graduated in 1938 from Central High School, where he was the soccer team captain, according to the Jewish Sports Hall of Fame.
FOOD
August 15, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Like every great home cook, Josephine Samuel has one legendary signature dish. "My mother showed me how to do fried chicken and how you make it taste real good," said Samuel, a Mantua resident. But, she added wistfully, "You can't eat fried chicken every night. " So, she enrolled in "Local Culinary Traditions," a new, free course offering from Drexel University's Center for Hospitality and Sports Management that invites West Philadelphia residents and any Drexel students to collaborate in documenting beloved family recipes and experimenting with making them healthier.
SPORTS
August 9, 2014 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Columnist
Drexel athletic director Eric Zillmer had no doubt Thursday's vote by the NCAA Division I board of directors would grant approval for the "Power Five" conferences to gain the autonomy to chart their own course. He also has no doubt this is the wrong course for college sports. He hopes schools override the vote, as Drexel plans to do. Zillmer believes the Big Ten, Pac-12, Southeastern Conference, Atlantic Coast Conference, and Big 12 are grabbing fistfuls of more power by hiding behind what Zillmer calls "their version of enhancing student welfare.
NEWS
August 8, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Carey Rosenthal, 71, of Newtown Square, an associate professor of chemistry at Drexel University, died Wednesday, July 30, of endocarditis and renal failure in Philadelphia. Dr. Rosenthal taught for more than 40 years at Drexel, pausing for a sabbatical as a Princeton University Fellow. The product of his research at Princeton with Herschel Rabitz was an article published in Science, the magazine of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He never retired from his teaching job at Drexel, his family said.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Imagine the largest-ever unspooling of Christmas ribbon candy made of hard yet pliable maple. Or a flexibly reedy roller coaster fashioned from walnut and coiling through the expanse of a white gallery. Or a three-dimensional, 1,400-foot-long line drawing made of pine, floating in space. The reality of these imaginings can be found at Drexel's Leonard Pearlstein Gallery starting Wednesday, when abstract installation artist Jeremy Holmes' site-specific exhibition "Convergence" opens, marking his Philadelphia debut and also his longest bentwood installation yet. (He previously topped out at a quarter-mile - 1,320 feet.)
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