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Drexel University

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NEWS
January 28, 2000 | by Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer
Amanda "Amy" Wall and her family are finally telling their story: an unexplained cure of nerve deafness in both her ears that will finally turn Philadelphia's Blessed Katharine Drexel into a saint of the Roman Catholic Church. But Amy, a button-cute 7-year-old who'll make her first communion soon, was smilingly media-shy yesterday. She hugged and clung to and whispered with her mom, whose prayers and determination made it all happen. "Before, she was special," Constance Wall declared at Sisters of the Blessed Sacrament convent in Bensalem.
NEWS
July 5, 2013 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
Cool futuristic looks, courtesy of Drexel University students, sauntered down the run- way at last month's annual senior fashion show. The presentation, held on Urban Outfitters' campus at the Navy Yard, featured amazing examples of the latest in women's wear, menswear, bridal, eveningwear, and children's clothing. Some designs popped, like Kate Murphy's lace shorts. Others sizzled, as in Jaizelle Hanna-Sten- dardo's grouping of silver- tiered eveningwear. Flashes of color were big trends, too, including Yeon Son and Alice Stevenson's menswear.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2015 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
There's nothing fancy about the ensemble of redbrick houses that line the 3600 block of Lancaster Avenue in Powelton Village. Built in the late 1870s, when the avenue linked country farms to city markets, the modest, wood-trimmed buildings housed working people who tended shops on the ground floor. Folks still live upstairs today, and neighborhood businesses - bike store, nail salon, day-care center - still pepper the storefronts below. Such blocks are what make Philadelphia, well, Philadelphia.
NEWS
June 14, 2012 | Elizabeth Wellington
Wedding gowns inspired by boned corsets (ouch), children's wear with images from European storybooks (cute), and sportswear with medieval armor detailing (interesting) were among the 10 collections Drexel students showed earlier this month at their annual fashion show at the Urban Outfitters Navy Yard complex. Some favorites included Julia Edick's handknit children's sweaters, which married Old World charm with a retro sensibility. The handmade buttons were a nice detail that helped her win Drexel's Most Creative Graduate Collection Award.
NEWS
June 30, 1988 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard D. Breslin, a former Catholic priest who has been president of the University of Charleston in West Virginia for the last four years, was named yesterday as Drexel University's new president. At a news conference after his unanimous selection during a special meeting of the board of trustees, Breslin, 50, said he expected to be in his new post by the start of classes in September. He said his first priorities would include developing a long-range plan for the 12,451-student university, fashioning a system of governance for the school and launching a major fund-raising campaign in connection with Drexel's centennial celebration in 1991.
NEWS
November 2, 2013 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
People need to look past the men's missing limbs, Marine Corps artist Michael Fay said, to see the resilience in their faces. Even if those faces are scarred and misshapen. One portrait shows Sgt. David Adams, a young Marine from Wisconsin, using his remaining arm to hold an X-ray of his broken back. Cpl. Zachary Stinson has lost both legs. The face of Lance Cpl. Kyle Carpenter, who was wounded by a hand grenade, looks like cracked porcelain. Those and dozens more paintings and sketches make up the Joe Bonham Project, created by Fay and showing at Drexel University as part of a new course on how war is portrayed in the media.
NEWS
July 12, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
HE WAS ONE awesome Santa! At 6-foot-6, Richard A. Binder obviously had the kind and loving demeanor that kept him from scaring the pants off the little ones who wanted to get in their bids for Christmas gifts. Richard assumed his Santa role for the Christmas party given annually by the Drexel University library, where he worked for more than 25 years. Taking care of children's wishes was typical of the spirit of this man, who spent his life caring for others, serving the poor, the spiritual needs of prisoners, the needy of Iran as a Peace Corps member, among others.
NEWS
November 20, 2012 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
A man who was seriously injured by a Drexel University police vehicle in a chase last year plans to sue the school, his attorney said. Walter Johnson, 44, caught the attention of Drexel police on the evening of Dec. 30, 2011, after he was seen trying to enter several buildings on campus. Believing Johnson was trying to break into the buildings, officers tried to question him, and he fled. As Johnson ran, a surveillance camera captured a Drexel police vehicle following him that appeared to drive directly at him. On the video, the cruiser slams into Johnson, pinning him to a wall.
BUSINESS
June 22, 2011 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Drexel University's next "campus master plan" will shift the school's focus on expansion away from West Philly and toward Center City. "North traditionally was where Drexel expanded, up to Powelton Avenue," the school's new president, John Fry, said Monday, through West Philly blocks now crammed with student rentals. Now Fry wants to redevelop parts of Drexel's "core," including the orange-brick buildings that still give parts of the campus a 1960s feel, and expand east toward the Amtrak yards and the old office buildings between Drexel and the Schuylkill.
NEWS
August 15, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
M. Dolores "Dode" Quinn, 92, of Malvern, a Drexel University professor who was an authority on fashionable, functional clothing designs for the physically disabled, died Wednesday, Aug. 8, at the Otesaga Resort Hotel in Cooperstown, N.Y., where she was vacationing with family. For almost 40 years, Miss Quinn taught fashion design and the history of costume at Drexel. In 1977, she gave students attending a summer course the task of designing for handicapped people. She later told a New York Times reporter that in addition to talking with nurses, therapists, and disabled people, students taped their fingers together, tried dressing with only one arm, and confined themselves in other ways to understand the dressing limitations of the disabled.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2015 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Yuck! The 3D "Animal Grossology" exhibit, based on Sylvia Branzei's children's book series Grossology , showcases the stinkiest, smelliest experiences nature has to offer. Entertain your inquisitive nature at the exhibit's Cart of Curiosity with themes such as "Ew, That Comes From Where?" and see the icky origins of popular items such as honey, perfume, and even certain types coffee. At the "Patterns of the Poop" exhibit, you can take rubber recreations and match the end product to the animal from which it came.
NEWS
May 14, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
After John C. Instone had served as an Army lieutenant in North Africa and Italy, he returned to his studies at what is now Drexel University. But on some weekends, his homework competed for his attention with the likes of the New Wynmar Ballroom, atop the Woolworth building on Ogontz Avenue near Church Lane. He was the trumpet player and leader of the 12-piece Jack Instone Orchestra, playing dance dates, mostly in Olney and Northeast Philadelphia from 1946 to 1949. Though the band was relatively short-lived, son John C. Jr. said, "he absolutely loved it. " On Saturday, May 9, Mr. Instone, 91, of Marlton, who retired in 1988 as president and CEO of SL Industries there, died at Virtua Voorhees Hospital.
NEWS
May 11, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
It didn't take long for Walter Mitchell, 16, to draw a connection between teenagers without jobs in Philadelphia and the recent looting and vandalism in Baltimore. "If those kids would have been at work," they would not have been out on the streets, said Mitchell, of North Philadelphia, a high school student with ambitions to study mechanical engineering in college. "They wouldn't have risked losing their jobs. Mitchell stopped to talk last week outside the Philadelphia School District's central administration building.
NEWS
May 4, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
For Julia Wagner, conquering Lyme disease is personal. Eleven years ago, she came down with the tick-borne illness. Though most people recover quickly after a course of antibiotics, Wagner was among those who wound up with complex infections. Over the course of a year, she suffered dramatic neurological changes, temporarily losing her memory and her ability to express herself. Aggressive treatment eventually reversed her symptoms, she says, and inspired her to help others as president of the PA Lyme Resource Network.
BUSINESS
May 3, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Population: 31,694 (estimate). Median household income: $37,371. Area: 1.59 square miles. Settlements in the last three months: 66. Homes for sale: 125. Average days on market: 69. Median sale price: $209,000. Housing stock: From 19th- century rowhouses to new single-family construction. School district: Philadelphia. SOURCES: City-Data.com; Kevin Gillen, Meyers Research/Lindy Institute, Drexel University; Chris Somers, Re/Max Access, Northern Liberties
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2015 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
There's nothing fancy about the ensemble of redbrick houses that line the 3600 block of Lancaster Avenue in Powelton Village. Built in the late 1870s, when the avenue linked country farms to city markets, the modest, wood-trimmed buildings housed working people who tended shops on the ground floor. Folks still live upstairs today, and neighborhood businesses - bike store, nail salon, day-care center - still pepper the storefronts below. Such blocks are what make Philadelphia, well, Philadelphia.
NEWS
May 1, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
MANY PEOPLE look at the moon and think, isn't that pretty. Louis Diodoro looked at the moon and said, "Let's go there!" Louis was an aeronautical engineer with General Electric for nearly 30 years, working on many key aspects of America's space exploration. His department designed and built the nose cones for the rockets that, in 1961, first sent a chimp into space, and then in July 1969 - the culmination of an aeronautical engineer's dream- sent Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin to walk on the moon in the Apollo 11 program.
BUSINESS
April 18, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
A group of vocal anti-drilling activists Thursday night briefly disrupted a Drexel University symposium on exporting liquefied natural gas, giving the city a flavor of the opposition that LNG might arouse. "I'm sorry, I'm going to have to interrupt you and ask you to sit down," City Councilman David Oh said to one of the activists. Drexel security personnel escorted about seven of the protesters out after they persisted. Oh organized the event, attended by about 100 people, to explore the feasibility of locating a facility in the city to liquefy Marcellus Shale natural gas for export.
NEWS
April 17, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
A caller awaited Central High School's principal when he arrived at school Wednesday: Mayor Nutter. The city's chief executive, it turns out, had read an Inquirer story detailing the plight of Central's RoboLancers, the student-led robotics program. The team recently won the organization's top honor and a pass to its world championship in St. Louis next week - but needed $35,000 to get there. "He told me it was important for us to be at Worlds," principal Timothy McKenna said. "He said he was going to make calls on our behalf.
NEWS
April 17, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
CENTRAL HIGH School's robotics team has overcome its first hurdle in the quest to win a national competition: raising the money to get there. Drexel University and the University of Pennsylvania each pledged to donate $20,000 in response to a request from Mayor Nutter to help the magnet school's team raise $35,000 to attend the FIRST World Championship, a four-day competition next week in St. Louis. In announcing the contributions yesterday, Nutter praised the universities for answering the call.
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