CollectionsDrexel University
IN THE NEWS

Drexel University

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 28, 2000 | by Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer
Amanda "Amy" Wall and her family are finally telling their story: an unexplained cure of nerve deafness in both her ears that will finally turn Philadelphia's Blessed Katharine Drexel into a saint of the Roman Catholic Church. But Amy, a button-cute 7-year-old who'll make her first communion soon, was smilingly media-shy yesterday. She hugged and clung to and whispered with her mom, whose prayers and determination made it all happen. "Before, she was special," Constance Wall declared at Sisters of the Blessed Sacrament convent in Bensalem.
NEWS
July 5, 2013 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
Cool futuristic looks, courtesy of Drexel University students, sauntered down the run- way at last month's annual senior fashion show. The presentation, held on Urban Outfitters' campus at the Navy Yard, featured amazing examples of the latest in women's wear, menswear, bridal, eveningwear, and children's clothing. Some designs popped, like Kate Murphy's lace shorts. Others sizzled, as in Jaizelle Hanna-Sten- dardo's grouping of silver- tiered eveningwear. Flashes of color were big trends, too, including Yeon Son and Alice Stevenson's menswear.
NEWS
June 14, 2012 | Elizabeth Wellington
Wedding gowns inspired by boned corsets (ouch), children's wear with images from European storybooks (cute), and sportswear with medieval armor detailing (interesting) were among the 10 collections Drexel students showed earlier this month at their annual fashion show at the Urban Outfitters Navy Yard complex. Some favorites included Julia Edick's handknit children's sweaters, which married Old World charm with a retro sensibility. The handmade buttons were a nice detail that helped her win Drexel's Most Creative Graduate Collection Award.
NEWS
June 30, 1988 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard D. Breslin, a former Catholic priest who has been president of the University of Charleston in West Virginia for the last four years, was named yesterday as Drexel University's new president. At a news conference after his unanimous selection during a special meeting of the board of trustees, Breslin, 50, said he expected to be in his new post by the start of classes in September. He said his first priorities would include developing a long-range plan for the 12,451-student university, fashioning a system of governance for the school and launching a major fund-raising campaign in connection with Drexel's centennial celebration in 1991.
NEWS
November 20, 2012 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
A man who was seriously injured by a Drexel University police vehicle in a chase last year plans to sue the school, his attorney said. Walter Johnson, 44, caught the attention of Drexel police on the evening of Dec. 30, 2011, after he was seen trying to enter several buildings on campus. Believing Johnson was trying to break into the buildings, officers tried to question him, and he fled. As Johnson ran, a surveillance camera captured a Drexel police vehicle following him that appeared to drive directly at him. On the video, the cruiser slams into Johnson, pinning him to a wall.
NEWS
July 12, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
HE WAS ONE awesome Santa! At 6-foot-6, Richard A. Binder obviously had the kind and loving demeanor that kept him from scaring the pants off the little ones who wanted to get in their bids for Christmas gifts. Richard assumed his Santa role for the Christmas party given annually by the Drexel University library, where he worked for more than 25 years. Taking care of children's wishes was typical of the spirit of this man, who spent his life caring for others, serving the poor, the spiritual needs of prisoners, the needy of Iran as a Peace Corps member, among others.
NEWS
August 15, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
M. Dolores "Dode" Quinn, 92, of Malvern, a Drexel University professor who was an authority on fashionable, functional clothing designs for the physically disabled, died Wednesday, Aug. 8, at the Otesaga Resort Hotel in Cooperstown, N.Y., where she was vacationing with family. For almost 40 years, Miss Quinn taught fashion design and the history of costume at Drexel. In 1977, she gave students attending a summer course the task of designing for handicapped people. She later told a New York Times reporter that in addition to talking with nurses, therapists, and disabled people, students taped their fingers together, tried dressing with only one arm, and confined themselves in other ways to understand the dressing limitations of the disabled.
BUSINESS
June 22, 2011 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Drexel University's next "campus master plan" will shift the school's focus on expansion away from West Philly and toward Center City. "North traditionally was where Drexel expanded, up to Powelton Avenue," the school's new president, John Fry, said Monday, through West Philly blocks now crammed with student rentals. Now Fry wants to redevelop parts of Drexel's "core," including the orange-brick buildings that still give parts of the campus a 1960s feel, and expand east toward the Amtrak yards and the old office buildings between Drexel and the Schuylkill.
NEWS
November 2, 2013 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
People need to look past the men's missing limbs, Marine Corps artist Michael Fay said, to see the resilience in their faces. Even if those faces are scarred and misshapen. One portrait shows Sgt. David Adams, a young Marine from Wisconsin, using his remaining arm to hold an X-ray of his broken back. Cpl. Zachary Stinson has lost both legs. The face of Lance Cpl. Kyle Carpenter, who was wounded by a hand grenade, looks like cracked porcelain. Those and dozens more paintings and sketches make up the Joe Bonham Project, created by Fay and showing at Drexel University as part of a new course on how war is portrayed in the media.
BUSINESS
February 18, 2013 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Can you teach creativity to business students? Can colleges prep graduates to go out on their own, instead of Working for the Man? To be founders, innovators, industry disrupters - in a word popularized by 20th-century economist Joseph Schumpeter, entrepreneurs ? Two schools are trying extra hard. In Philadelphia, Drexel University last month announced a new college, the Charles D. Close School of Entrepreneurship, backed by a $12.5 million gift from the late chairman of Compudyne Corp., a 1936 Drexel engineering graduate.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 23, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Way back when, New Jersey was not the Garden State. It was the Kill or Be Killed State. And at the top of the heap was a fearsome creature called Mosasaurus , currently playing a memorable role in that new dinosaur flick you may have heard about. Mosasaurus was no dinosaur. It was a marine reptile, part of a broader family called the mosasaurs, in an era when much of New Jersey was underwater. While the toothy carnivores were common in much of the world, the first North American fossil specimens were found in New Jersey in the early 1800s, shaping our knowledge of prehistory well before anyone had a good idea what a dinosaur was. Fossil-hunters today continue to find mosasaur vertebrae and horror-movie teeth - some of them 5 inches long - at sites in Gloucester and Monmouth Counties.
NEWS
June 20, 2015 | By Madeline R. Conway, Inquirer Staff Writer
Raushaun Williams started reading at age 3, and at 4 took an IQ test that identified him as gifted. But in the classroom, he was restless, and when he started kindergarten, he was regularly suspended. Several years and schools later, family and teachers point to the West Philadelphia teenager, now 16, as a role model for his upward academic trajectory. The Roman Catholic High School graduate is headed to Drexel University, where he intends to study biology this fall on a full scholarship.
NEWS
June 13, 2015 | Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia's millennial population is good at registering to vote. But getting to the polls and pushing the button? Not so much. Data from the city's May 19 primary show that while 321,342 Philadelphians between ages 18 and 34 were registered, only 38,686 voted. That's 12 percent, according to an analysis by City Commissioner Al Schmidt. Schmidt, one of the three commissioners who oversee city elections, found what pols and political scientists have seen in U.S. elections for years: the older the voter, the more likely he or she is to vote.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nicole Angemi dissects human bodies for a living, so she routinely sees diseased lungs, brains, ulcerated colons, and severed limbs. She wants everyone else to be able to see such things, too. Angemi, a pathologist's assistant at a Philadelphia-area hospital that she declines to name, posts graphic images several times a day to her Instagram account , which boasts 245,000 followers. "It's hurting my stomach," one wrote next to a recent photo of a skull cut open to reveal the brain.
NEWS
June 9, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
On first glance, it could pass for an ATM. Or the machine at the Wawa for ordering sandwiches. But the sleek, wireless kiosk tucked in a corner of Drexel University's rec center has a much more weighty purpose. "Get a CHECK-UP from the NECK UP?" a sign near it beckons. On it, students who are feeling depressed or having other mental-health issues can take anonymous, two-minute screenings to see whether they may have a problem. And if their responses suggest a mental illness, the machine arms them with resources and places to go for help.
NEWS
June 8, 2015 | By Molly Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Seventeen years ago, Mark Christopher watched as 54 , the film he wrote and directed, was taken away from him by Miramax and recut beyond recognition. The movie - starring Ryan Phillippe, Neve Campbell, Salma Hayek, and Mike Myers (as club owner Steve Rubell) - concerns the decadent goings-on at the New York club Studio 54 in the 1970s. In Christopher's mind, it was a dark film with strong gay themes. By the time of its release, it was about a plucky Jersey boy trying to make it in the big city.
NEWS
June 5, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Elizabeth Emma Miller Zaro, 95, of Valley Forge, an officer in the Navy WAVES during World War II and later a homemaker and secretary, died Saturday, May 23, at Paoli Hospital of complications following a fall. Born in Williamstown, Pa., she was the daughter of Dr. Morris W. and Harriet E. Humphreys Miller. She grew up in Ebensburg and attended Allegheny College in Meadville, Pa., briefly before transferring to the Drexel Institute of Technology (now Drexel University), from which she graduated in 1941.
BUSINESS
June 4, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The University City Science Center plans to more than double its size over 10 years as it seeks to lure higher-profile biomedical and technology firms to the West Philadelphia business incubation and research complex. The Science Center and its development partner on the expansion, Wexford Science & Technology, will pool their landholdings in the area to build more than four million square feet of offices, laboratories, homes, retail shops, and parking structures, the Science Center said Tuesday.
BUSINESS
June 2, 2015
Drexel University has named M. Brian Blake as its next provost and executive vice president for academic affairs. Blake, who comes to Drexel from the University of Miami, where he is vice provost for academic affairs and dean of the graduate school, will start in his new position Aug. 1. Holy Ghost Preparatory School in Bensalem said Father James P. McCloskey will step down as president of the Spiritan institution effective July...
SPORTS
May 29, 2015 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Landra "Jenny" Hamid would have loved this process, her son believes. And Rakeem Christmas also has no doubt that his mother, who died of kidney failure, a complication of lupus, will be looking down in amazement during the NBA draft on June 25. "She's proud of me," said Christmas, 23, whose mother died when he was 5. "That's all I'm trying to do is make her and my family proud. " So far, so good. The former Academy of the New Church standout is believed to be the first Syracuse basketball player to graduate in three years.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|