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Drexel

NEWS
April 14, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Facing a couple hundred of his employees this month, Drexel University president John A. Fry outlined his latest plan to remodel the campus once named the nation's ugliest. "That East German-like plaza that we have right now is going to be replaced by something that's really wonderful," he said. Fry pointed to an artist's rendering of a renovated campus quad thick with trees and grass and bordered by the LeBow College of Business building, a contemporary glass-and-limestone tower opened two years ago, and the Korman Center, which would get a much-needed face-lift.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2015
DREXEL University junior Zakiya James didn't graduate from high school, or even spend much time there. She never took the SATs or got a GED. None of that stopped the 17-year-old from becoming a Drexel Dragon in January. Since transferring to the school, she has been thriving, taking a host of heavy-duty engineering courses. But there's one small problem: Zakiya's parents can't afford Drexel's pricey tuition. Not by a long shot. Her mother, who works as a medical receptionist in Washington, D.C., was able to make Zakiya's housing deposit and gave her money for books, but that was pretty much it. Zakiya has gotten financial aid from the school, but she is faced with the onerous task of coming up with the rest of the money she needs for tuition on her own. It's heartbreaking.
NEWS
April 3, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
In March, Sigma Sound Studios was approved by the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission for a historical marker. The North 12th Street studio is one of the birthplaces of The Sound of Philadelphia, and it's where pop classics such as David Bowie's "Young Americans" and Elton John's "Philadelphia Freedom" were recorded. That building recently was bought for $1.55 million for, of course, new apartments and condos. Famed recording engineer Joe Tarsia opened Sigma in 1968 and sold it in 2003 (to contractor Mario Santoro)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2015 | By Natalie Pompilio, For The Inquirer
In just eight months, he's become one of Drexel University's most popular staffers. If he's not meeting with students in his West Philadelphia office, he's making the rounds of university events: Study Palooza in Center City, a meet-and-greet at the law school, boot camp in the Recreation Center, where he also has his office. "He loves his job," said Kathryn Formica, the university's coordinator of student fitness and wellness, of her office mate. "I think he's going for tenure. " This new employee is a dog, a Carolina blend with some shiba inu and corgi mixed in. His name is Jersey, and as his office nameplate attests, he is a certified therapy dog. Jersey is one of the first on-site, year-round canine therapists at a U.S. college or university, Drexel says.
SPORTS
April 1, 2015 | BY DICK JERARDI, Daily News Staff Writer jerardd@phillynews.com
DREXEL SENIOR Damion Lee will graduate in a few months, which, in today's college basketball world, essentially makes him a free agent. Lee, who took a medical redshirt in 2013-14 after tearing an ACL in Drexel's fifth game and has 1 year of eligibility remaining, told coach Bruiser Flint over the weekend that he plans to play his final season at another school. "What are you going to do?" Flint said. "That's what he said he wants to do, so that's what he's doing. " It is essentially what Temple's Anthony Lee did last year.
SPORTS
April 1, 2015 | By John N. Mitchell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Junior swingman Damion Lee said Monday he has decided to transfer from Drexel. "I came to Drexel as a freshman and my plan was to graduate in four years," said Lee, who led the Dragons in scoring this season. "I'm going to do that. I love the coaching staff, the people around me and Drexel. But my decision wasn't personal or emotionally based - it was strictly business. " Drexel coach Bruiser Flint was not available for comment. The 6-foot-6 Lee will graduate next month with a degree in public relations.
NEWS
March 27, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
LAST NIGHT, people in Philly, Virginia, Washington, D.C., and beyond mourned the deaths of Emily and Yvonne Selke. The Drexel University alumna and her mother were two of the 150 passengers killed in a plane crash in the French Alps on Tuesday, according to a statement from the Selke family. The statement described them as "two wonderful, caring, amazing people who meant so much to so many," adding: "At this difficult time, we respectfully ask for privacy and your prayers. " The women, natives of Nokesville, Va., died when the Germanwings airliner crashed en route to Dusseldorf, Germany.
NEWS
March 27, 2015 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Emily Selke, a 2013 graduate of Drexel University, and her mother, Yvonne Ciarlo Selke, a 1975 graduate of Springfield High School in Delaware County, had a close relationship. "They were very supportive of each other. It was sweet to see. It was like the ideal mother-daughter relationship," said Xela Batchelder, an assistant professor at Drexel. The Selkes were traveling Tuesday on the Germanwings Airbus A320 that crashed in the southern French Alps. There were no survivors among the 150 people aboard Flight 9525 from Barcelona, Spain, to Dusseldorf, Germany.
NEWS
March 17, 2015 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Columnist
Using the transitive property, we can easily prove Division II University of the Sciences could have made the Final Four, if only the school were in Division I. The Sciences victory over Drexel is the key to the whole thing. Sorry, Villanova, Virginia, Duke, Wisconsin, and Gonzaga. Here's how it goes: Sciences vDrexel vNortheastern vSanta Clara vSan Diego vBYU vGonzaga. Sciences vDrexel vWilliam and Mary vRice vCharlotte vPenn State vRutgers vWisconsin. Sciences vDrexel vWilliam and Mary vJames Madison vSacred Heart vHoly Cross vBrown vProvidence vNotre Dame vDuke vVirginia.
SPORTS
March 8, 2015 | By Jeff Seidel, For The Inquirer
BALTIMORE - Drexel controlled most of the first half in Friday night's matchup with College of Charleston, but the second half was a much different story. The injury-plagued Dragons, who dressed only seven players, held a five-point halftime lead but appeared to tire as the College of Charleston ended their season with a 56-48 victory in a first-round Colonial Athletic Association tournament game at Royal Farms Arena on Friday night. Seventh-seeded Drexel finished with an 11-19 record.
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