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Drexel

NEWS
April 27, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
A toy crossbow released its payload, toppling a pyramid of plastic cups. A soccer ball rolled down a track. Dominoes, pulleys, and levers all did their thing. But after four hours of tweaking and testing Friday, Drexel University engineering students did not manage to break the record for the world's largest Rube Goldberg machine. Yet. After it was clear that the outlandish contraption would not run from start to finish without hitches, electrical and computer engineering professor Adam Fontecchio told the 43 freshmen they had to pack up their creation and remove it from the atrium of the school's Bossone Research Center.
NEWS
April 26, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
After finishing his lesson this week, Drexel University instructor Bob Ambrose told his undergraduates to take five. "Play some slots," he suggested. Which they did, attaching themselves to three bona fide slot machines and pulling their handles. The university this month became the first in the state to install slot machines for use in its casino management courses. The machines, known as "Reel Money," "Power Strike," and "American Original," donated by Bally Technology, don't accept money or pay out, but work much the same as a slot machine on any casino floor.
NEWS
March 30, 2014 | By Seth Zweifler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Moments after the crepe batter started bubbling and the potatos were being peeled, Nazir Hanible's Friday morning took a turn for the worse. As the 19-year-old aspiring chef reached across the counter to start slicing and dicing his ingredients, the tip of his left index finger met the edge of a very sharp kitchen knife. He had to stop mid-stride to wash the wound and put on a bandage. Minutes later, Hanible was back in the thick of things, standing shoulder to shoulder with 18 other high school chefs who spent the morning at Drexel University, chopping, stirring, whisking, and pouring, each in the hope of scoring a big-time scholarship to culinary school.
NEWS
March 29, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
He would change very little. John Yoo, the former Justice Department lawyer and Philadelphia native who laid the legal groundwork for President George W. Bush's administration to use waterboarding and other harsh interrogation techniques, told faculty and students at Drexel University law school Thursday that he had correctly interpreted the law. And that he would do it again. "I do stand by the line that we drew," Yoo said. Yoo came to the law school for an hour-long exchange with Harvey Rishikof, a former legal counsel to the FBI who teaches national security law at Drexel.
NEWS
March 28, 2014 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
A DECADE later, America's post-9/11 descent into torture is still an open wound for many - as folks are finding out this week at Drexel University Law School. A Philadelphia lawyers' group is ripping the law school for hosting a talk this afternoon by John Yoo, the ex-Justice Department lawyer who crafted the legal justification for the Bush administration's use of waterboarding and other torture tactics on terrorism suspects. The National Lawyers Guild called Yoo's slated appearance "deplorable," adding that his legal advice had sparked "negative repercussions in American foreign relations that we are still dealing with a dozen years later.
BUSINESS
March 25, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
In Philadelphia, Drexel University's president, John A. Fry, 53, is known as one of the chief architects of a revitalization of West Philadelphia in a program developed while he held the top nonacademic post at the University of Pennsylvania from 1995 to 2002. These days, he's trying to pull off the same transformation in three neighborhoods around Drexel. He also has grand plans to cap the Amtrak and SEPTA rail yards near 30th Street Station, creating 80 to 90 acres of developable space in the heart of what he's calling the "Innovation Neighborhood.
NEWS
March 20, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA A Drexel University engineering sophomore was killed earlier this month by the same strain of bacterium that caused a meningitis outbreak at Princeton University last year, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has confirmed. The Drexel student, identified by the university as sophomore Stephanie Ross, had been in close contact with Princeton students who had come to Philadelphia for a party about a week before she got sick. She died March 10 after her housemates at Phi Mu sorority found her unresponsive in her room, according to a Drexel statement.
SPORTS
March 17, 2014 | The Inquirer Staff
James Madison used a 16-0 run to grab control en route to a 55-43 win over Drexel in a Colonial Athletic Association semifinal in Upper Marlboro, Md. The loss eliminated Drexel (15-16) from consideration for the NCAA tournament and WNIT, the first time Drexel has not appeared in either postseason event since 2008. Fiona Flanagan (Notre Dame Academy) and Abby Redick, each appearing in her final game for the Dragons, led the team with 10 points apiece. Senior Tory Thierolf (Germantown Academy)
NEWS
March 13, 2014 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
THE DEATH OF a Drexel University student Monday could be the result of meningitis, officials said yesterday. Stephanie Ross, a sophomore mechanical engineering major and member of the Phi Mu (Beta Tau) sorority, was found unresponsive by her housemates on Monday at the sorority house and was transported to Penn Presbyterian Medical Center, officials said. Although the cause of death has not yet been determined, the university said it is treating it as a suspected case of meningitis and is working with the Philadelphia Health Department to take all necessary precautions.
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