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Drinking Age

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September 2, 2008 | Robert Nash Parker
Robert Nash Parker of the University of California, Riverside. A well-intentioned but misguided group of college and university presidents has been in the news recently for suggesting that we revisit the drinking age and for asserting that 21 "is not working. " Called the Amethyst Initiative, their proposal would have received a failing grade in my sociology classroom for its faulty logic and because of how unmindful it is of the history of alcohol policy in the United States.
NEWS
August 26, 2008 | James T. Harris III
James T. Harris III is president of Widener University Next week, Widener University will welcome a wonderful class of freshmen excited to begin college life. In preparation for their arrival, we spent time helping our students and their parents understand what it means to become a responsible member of our academic community. A large part of that orientation addressed alcohol awareness, including educating students about the negative effects of alcohol consumption and reinforcing that we will not tolerate underage drinking on our campus.
NEWS
December 2, 1986 | By Aaron Epstein, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The Supreme Court agreed yesterday to decide whether Congress acted unconstitutionally in 1984 when it sought to reduce drunken-driving accidents by pressuring the states to adopt a minimum drinking age of 21. Congress passed, and President Reagan signed, a law providing that a portion of federal highway aid money - 5 percent next year and 10 percent in 1988 - be withheld from any state that failed to adopt the minimum-drinking- age requirement by...
NEWS
December 23, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Laws mandating seat-belt use and raising the drinking age can save thousands of lives and billions of dollars each year, researchers said yesterday. One report in today's Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) suggested that seat-belt use in North Carolina and Chicago reduced accident fatalities. A third JAMA study showed that deaths linked to drunken driving in young adults declined significantly when Tennessee raised its drinking age and toughened penalties for drunken driving.
NEWS
August 25, 2008
From the hallowed halls of academia, college presidents have opened a needed debate about underage drinking and alcohol abuse. College presidents have raised the question of whether to lower the drinking age from 21 to 18, in an effort to reduce binge drinking on campus by underage students. Opponents dismissed the idea, arguing that it's an attempt by colleges and universities to escape legal liability and would lead to more alcohol-related deaths. Both sides raise valid concerns.
NEWS
December 29, 2008 | By Robert J. Chapman and Stephen F. Gambescia
A potentially intoxicating national debate about college students' behavior started this fall. More than 130 university and college presidents have questioned the legal drinking age of 21, arguing that current alcohol-control policies aren't working. The presidents want health experts and policymakers to have an "informed and unimpeded debate" about alcohol use and abuse. This call to review and rethink alcohol policies is understandable, given that student drinking consumes an inordinate share of the time and resources of college faculty and staff.
NEWS
November 10, 1986
I find it hard to believe that I am old enough to go to war and defend this country's basic rights and freedoms, which is something that I am more than willing to do, and yet can't walk into a bar to get a drink. The drinking age should be 18, not 21. I understand that one of the leading causes of teenage death is drunken- driving accidents but know also that teenagers are not the only drunk drivers on the road. The answer is not to take away the right of 18-to-20-year-olds to drink alcohol (unless you take away everybody's right to drink)
NEWS
January 3, 1986 | By Chris Conway, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Drunken-driving fatalities dropped 43 percent in New Jersey from 1981 to 1984, a decline that a state commission said yesterday was due in part to a higher legal drinking age and the enactment of tough drunken-driving laws. The Commission on Drunk Driving, in a report released yesterday, said deaths due to drunken driving fell steadily during the four-year period, from 376 in 1981 to 213 in 1984. The report added that if drunken-driving deaths had continued at their pre- 1981 rate, 400 people would have died in 1984.
NEWS
August 20, 2008 | By Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Pandora's bottle was uncorked yesterday over a national proposal that calls for rethinking the legal drinking age. Known as the Amethyst Initiative, it urges "dispassionate public debate" and has the signatures of presidents at St. Joseph's, Arcadia, Duke, Dartmouth and scores of other universities and colleges. Well, we now have a debate and then some. Yesterday, Mothers Against Drunk Driving denounced the idea as irresponsible and dangerous. And Nationwide Insurance released a poll of Americans - timed to press reports on the initiative - in which nearly 80 percent rejected lowering the drinking age from 21 to 18. Meanwhile, noted researchers took to task former Middlebury College president John McCardell and his plan, launched quietly last month.
NEWS
August 4, 1995 | BY FRANK J. CATANZARO II
Congress is throwing out the baby with the bath water. In the name of getting government off our backs, it's repealing highway safety laws that save lives and prevent crippling injuries. The truth is, trashing important drunken driving and safety protection laws would make us even more dependent on expensive health care and government services. House Resolution 607 repeals the national speed limit and 21 drinking age and eliminate federal incentives for states to pass safety belt and motorcycle helmet laws.
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NEWS
September 20, 2013
BREAK OUT your beer bong, the fall semester is in full gear. College is all about frat parties and tailgaters and suitcases of Natty Light . Right? Not so fast. For one small group of students at Temple University, beer is not just something to chug-chug-chug. The fledgling Temple Craft Beer Enthusiasts Club actually sips. Well, not always. "If PBR is on special and someone else is buying, I wouldn't say no," said the group's president, Alyssa Montgomery, a fifth-year senior business major from Bethlehem.
NEWS
July 1, 2011
In what has become a welcome annual rite, a Pittsburgh-area legislator has reintroduced a commonsense proposal to reinstate the requirement that all motorcycle riders in Pennsylvania must wear helmets. Earlier helmet-reform efforts by Rep. Dan Frankel (D., Allegheny) have only served to galvanize protests by motorcycle riders. In 2003, they convinced lawmakers and then-Gov. Edward G. Rendell to scrap the state's broad mandate for protective headgear. Unfortunately, this time around, Frankel expects the same disappointing result.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2010 | By Rick Nichols INQUIRER FOOD COLUMNIST
The Heineken that Tom Peters ordered on his maiden voyage to Brussels (en route to Paris) in 1984 was as ho-hum as the ones he'd had back home in Philadelphia. Would he like to try a "real beer"? the bartender asked. He would indeed. Which is how it came to pass that he had his first Duvel, golden and effervescent, the head so tall and creamy that he had to be instructed to tilt the glass and sip from under it. The Earth moved. He tried Orval next. Then Chimay Blue. Then delayed the train ride to France.
NEWS
December 29, 2008 | By Robert J. Chapman and Stephen F. Gambescia
A potentially intoxicating national debate about college students' behavior started this fall. More than 130 university and college presidents have questioned the legal drinking age of 21, arguing that current alcohol-control policies aren't working. The presidents want health experts and policymakers to have an "informed and unimpeded debate" about alcohol use and abuse. This call to review and rethink alcohol policies is understandable, given that student drinking consumes an inordinate share of the time and resources of college faculty and staff.
NEWS
September 7, 2008
No solution There has been a growing debate both locally and nationally about the legal drinking age, binge drinking, and college presidents signing on to a movement called the Amethyst Initiative. Mothers Against Drunk Driving certainly does not have all the answers and feels a discussion on the topic is appropriate. But to suggest lowering the legal drinking age to 18 will curb binge drinking goes beyond reason. Certainly MADD is concerned about increased DUI crashes, but even more important are the health issues surrounding childhood drinking and the addictive nature of alcohol.
NEWS
September 2, 2008 | Robert Nash Parker
Robert Nash Parker of the University of California, Riverside. A well-intentioned but misguided group of college and university presidents has been in the news recently for suggesting that we revisit the drinking age and for asserting that 21 "is not working. " Called the Amethyst Initiative, their proposal would have received a failing grade in my sociology classroom for its faulty logic and because of how unmindful it is of the history of alcohol policy in the United States.
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