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Drinking Water

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NEWS
April 13, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal, Staff Writer
Standing outside a Montgomery County military base where chemicals from firefighting foam has contaminated public drinking water, two local congressmen made a bipartisan appeal Monday for stricter drinking-water regulations. "Residents are understandably concerned these chemicals are to blame for their health concerns," said Rep. Brendan Boyle (D., Pa.). Boyle traveled Monday to Naval Air Station Willow Grove with Republican Rep. Patrick Meehan to apply public pressure to the Environmental Protection Agency to finalize new standards for safe levels of chemicals in drinking water.
NEWS
October 12, 2000 | By Susan Snyder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Philadelphia School District has begun providing bottled water to 70 schools that have yet to be tested for lead in their drinking water. "We've done this to allay people's concerns," said Barbara Farley, a district spokeswoman. The drinking-water taps have been shut off in those buildings and will stay off until they are determined to be safe through testing, she said. Last year, the school district signed an agreement with the city Health Department and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to begin testing for lead in water in all 295 district buildings.
NEWS
January 24, 1989 | By Sari Harrar, Special to The Inquirer
A farmer asked the Moorestown Township Council last night to help speed testing for hazardous chemical pollution in the groundwater on his property and other land in the eastern section of the township. "This is possibly affecting the drinking water of people in this area who are not on the municipal water system," asked farmer Greg Leonberg. "I would ask the township to help us in any way you can. Engineers for the General Electric Corp. this month asked Leonberg for permission to run tests on his 36-acre farm to determine how far chemicals have spread from underground leaks at GE's Government Electronic Systems Division on Borton Landing Road.
NEWS
April 23, 1989 | By Mark Jaffe, Inquirer Staff Writer
Every Monday morning, Laura Zalar and Ruby Burkett take a couple of gallon jugs of Clorox and hike about a mile to a small cinderblock bunker in the Cambria County woods. There they pour half a jug into a plastic 30-gallon tub and mix it with water. The solution runs out of a tube and slowly drips into the pipe that carries water from a pond in the woods to Onnalinda's 18 homes. And that is how this weathered, played-out coal hamlet disinfects its drinking water. "It's about the best we can do. . . . It seems to work all right," Zalar said.
NEWS
November 28, 2004 | By Dawn Fallik INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Scientists are finding traces of drugs, herbicides and fragrances - even birth-control hormones and weed killers - in the nation's drinking water. Where once experts thought the water-filtration process would eliminate the chemicals, new studies, including surveys in Philadelphia and New Jersey, have discovered otherwise. One water industry investigation into 18 drinking-water plants nationwide found the compounds in 14 of them. "Initially it was a surprise," said Joseph Bella, executive director for the Passaic Valley Water Commission, whose plant was the basis of the New Jersey study.
NEWS
April 19, 1994 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Even modern American cities like Philadelphia are vulnerable to microscopic killers in the water, environmental groups said yesterday as they urged Congress to support strict water quality controls. Citing the threat of microorganisms that defy chlorine and may escape detection, the groups pointed to federal Centers for Disease Control figures showing that 900,000 Americans are sickened by their drinking water each year. Last year a parasite killed 104 people and sickened 400,000 in Milwaukee.
NEWS
May 14, 1986 | By Charles Green, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Responding to concerns over groundwater contamination, the House yesterday voted overwhelmingly to strengthen the nation's main environmental law regulating drinking water supplies. The Senate is expected to approve the same measure - an overhaul of the 1974 Safe Drinking Water Act - and send it to the President, perhaps as early as this week, for his signature. The bill bans the use of lead in drinking-water systems, directs the Environmental Protection Agency to issue standards within three years for 83 contaminants, and requires states to begin taking steps to protect underground sources of drinking water.
NEWS
November 17, 1998 | By Paul Nussbaum, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia drinking water meets or exceeds all federal standards, according to a new report mandated by the 1996 Clean Water Act. About 3 percent of homes tested showed elevated levels of lead in tap water, and some samples of water supplied to homes in South and West Philadelphia showed elevated levels of disinfectant by-products. But none of the tests showed overall contamination beyond the range permitted by the Environmental Protection Agency. The Philadelphia Water Department will release a detailed, six-page report in advertisements in local weekly newspapers later this month and will mail copies of the 1998 version of the report to all customers with billing statements by next June, said Joanne Dahme, general manager of public affairs for the department.
NEWS
January 20, 1988 | By Laurie Hollman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Senate President John F. Russo announced an ambitious plan yesterday to clean up contaminated drinking water, a problem that he called "by far the most important facing New Jersey today. " The cornerstone of the plan is a $200 million bond issue that would raise money to help New Jersey cities replace tainted water supplies. Price, Russo said at a news conference in the Senate chambers, is no object when it comes to clean water. "We have neglected the safety of our drinking water far too long," he said, adding that the problem of unsafe drinking water is obvious when "you can't hold up a glass of water and know whether it will quench your thirst, make you sick or kill you. " Russo, a Democrat, is from Ocean County, where several recent cases of contaminated water have arisen.
NEWS
August 14, 1988 | By Eileen Reinhard, Special to The Inquirer
Mount Laurel's Township Council is considering a ban on lawn watering or other landscaping uses of township potable water at future commercial and industrial developments because of the recent serious drain on the township's water supply. The summer's long drought, which resulted in water restrictions, has threatened the township's water supply and forced the mayor and council to think about ways to ease the strain that a seemingly endless calendar of 90- degree-plus days has placed on the township's capacity to supply drinkable water.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 16, 2016
By Joseph M. Manko In recent weeks, the issue of safe drinking water has been unusually conspicuous, thanks to headlines emanating from Flint, Mich., and elsewhere. Philadelphians have good reason to be proud of their city's robust tradition of watershed protection and commitment to providing safe, top-quality drinking water. That commitment was first made 200 years ago, when the city's government, business, and community leaders decided on an innovative plan to create a public waterworks system that would guarantee safe drinking water for the citizens of Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 13, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal, Staff Writer
Standing outside a Montgomery County military base where chemicals from firefighting foam has contaminated public drinking water, two local congressmen made a bipartisan appeal Monday for stricter drinking-water regulations. "Residents are understandably concerned these chemicals are to blame for their health concerns," said Rep. Brendan Boyle (D., Pa.). Boyle traveled Monday to Naval Air Station Willow Grove with Republican Rep. Patrick Meehan to apply public pressure to the Environmental Protection Agency to finalize new standards for safe levels of chemicals in drinking water.
NEWS
April 9, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, STAFF WRITER
Cabot Oil & Gas Corp. on Thursday asked a federal magistrate to set aside a Scranton jury verdict last month that awarded two Dimock, Pa., families $4.24 million for their claims that Cabot's shale-gas operations contaminated their drinking water. The gas driller alleged that misconduct by the families' attorney, Leslie Lewis, tainted the jury, and that the testimony of two neighbors who had earlier signed settlements and non-disclosure agreements with Cabot should not have been permitted.
NEWS
April 9, 2016
New Jersey legislators are trying to correct an oversight in the state's environmental laws, which do not require schools to regularly test their water for lead. Unacceptable levels of lead have been found in the water at 30 of Newark's 67 public schools, which have shut down their water fountains. The discovery raises questions about water quality in schools around the state. A bill sponsored by Senate President Stephen Sweeney (D., Gloucester) and Sens. Ron Rice and Teresa Ruiz (both D., Essex)
NEWS
April 4, 2016
ISSUE | CLIMATE CHANGE No time to wait It is important that we take seriously the predictions of sea-level rise cited in last week's edition of the journal Nature ("Alarm on sea level rises to new heights," Thursday). The study illustrates that climate disruption can have a greater impact in a shorter time frame than had been projected: Oceans could rise by more than 6 feet by the end of the century if high levels of greenhouse-gas emissions continue. Many researchers have cautioned that conditions in the Mid-Atlantic region are likely to be worse than the global average.
NEWS
March 30, 2016 | By Maddie Hanna and Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
Gov. Christie has described the levels of lead found in Newark public school water as "nowhere near crisis. " But the revelations have renewed public interest - and lawmaker calls for action - in a long-standing problem that affects children across the state. The full scope of the problem in New Jersey, however, is difficult to ascertain: There are 2,500 public schools, and the state doesn't know how many, or which, test their water for lead; it doesn't inspect certain rental homes for the contaminant; and the state has a higher threshold for triggering public health action than the federal government recommends.
NEWS
March 23, 2016 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Staff Writer
As the water crisis in Flint, Mich., stokes concerns about lead in drinking supplies nationwide, water officials in Philadelphia wanted to make something clear Monday: Philly is not Flint. Lead is rarely found in drinking water here, officials said at an investigatory hearing of City Council. In cases where children were found to have lead exposure, drinking water was not the culprit, officials said. But Council members still pressed water and health officials to do more to address the estimated 50,000 homes that are connected to city water mains by lead pipes, saying even trace amounts of lead are too much.
NEWS
March 11, 2016
ISSUE | WATER QUALITY Stop the pipeline The PennEast Pipeline Co. has applied for a water permit from the Delaware River Basin Commission that would allow its destructive pipeline to run through the region. According to the application, the company plans to discharge or withdraw more than 45 million gallons of water. The 110-mile pipeline would cut through the Delaware River valley, beginning in Pennsylvania and crossing the river and 87 other waterways, including protected waters, into Hopewell Township, N.J. The application process could take up to a year, and, if rejected, the DRBC could help stop the pipeline.
NEWS
March 10, 2016
New Jersey's Pinelands Commission was once a respected, independent steward of a forest that filters the drinking water for millions in the region. But political manipulation has turned it into an ineffective agency that looks the other way when the preserve's delicate balance is threatened. The latest annual report of the Pinelands Preservation Alliance rightly notes that the forest is facing its greatest threat in decades because the commission simply is not doing its job. The panel's abdication is astounding given national concern over the lead-laden water that is threatening the health of Flint, Mich., residents.
NEWS
March 5, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal, Staff Writer
Is toxic water in the vicinity of the former Naval Air Station Willow Grove and the Naval Air Warfare Center in Warminster making people sick? That's the concern three area congressmen raised Thursday in a letter to the Navy demanding answers about the government's knowledge of the water issues. "Residents who consumed the contaminated water have understandable concern that these chemicals, which studies show can cause serious illness, are the cause of their own health conditions," wrote U.S. Reps.
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