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Drinking Water

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NEWS
October 12, 2000 | By Susan Snyder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Philadelphia School District has begun providing bottled water to 70 schools that have yet to be tested for lead in their drinking water. "We've done this to allay people's concerns," said Barbara Farley, a district spokeswoman. The drinking-water taps have been shut off in those buildings and will stay off until they are determined to be safe through testing, she said. Last year, the school district signed an agreement with the city Health Department and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to begin testing for lead in water in all 295 district buildings.
NEWS
January 24, 1989 | By Sari Harrar, Special to The Inquirer
A farmer asked the Moorestown Township Council last night to help speed testing for hazardous chemical pollution in the groundwater on his property and other land in the eastern section of the township. "This is possibly affecting the drinking water of people in this area who are not on the municipal water system," asked farmer Greg Leonberg. "I would ask the township to help us in any way you can. Engineers for the General Electric Corp. this month asked Leonberg for permission to run tests on his 36-acre farm to determine how far chemicals have spread from underground leaks at GE's Government Electronic Systems Division on Borton Landing Road.
NEWS
April 23, 1989 | By Mark Jaffe, Inquirer Staff Writer
Every Monday morning, Laura Zalar and Ruby Burkett take a couple of gallon jugs of Clorox and hike about a mile to a small cinderblock bunker in the Cambria County woods. There they pour half a jug into a plastic 30-gallon tub and mix it with water. The solution runs out of a tube and slowly drips into the pipe that carries water from a pond in the woods to Onnalinda's 18 homes. And that is how this weathered, played-out coal hamlet disinfects its drinking water. "It's about the best we can do. . . . It seems to work all right," Zalar said.
NEWS
November 28, 2004 | By Dawn Fallik INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Scientists are finding traces of drugs, herbicides and fragrances - even birth-control hormones and weed killers - in the nation's drinking water. Where once experts thought the water-filtration process would eliminate the chemicals, new studies, including surveys in Philadelphia and New Jersey, have discovered otherwise. One water industry investigation into 18 drinking-water plants nationwide found the compounds in 14 of them. "Initially it was a surprise," said Joseph Bella, executive director for the Passaic Valley Water Commission, whose plant was the basis of the New Jersey study.
NEWS
April 19, 1994 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Even modern American cities like Philadelphia are vulnerable to microscopic killers in the water, environmental groups said yesterday as they urged Congress to support strict water quality controls. Citing the threat of microorganisms that defy chlorine and may escape detection, the groups pointed to federal Centers for Disease Control figures showing that 900,000 Americans are sickened by their drinking water each year. Last year a parasite killed 104 people and sickened 400,000 in Milwaukee.
NEWS
May 14, 1986 | By Charles Green, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Responding to concerns over groundwater contamination, the House yesterday voted overwhelmingly to strengthen the nation's main environmental law regulating drinking water supplies. The Senate is expected to approve the same measure - an overhaul of the 1974 Safe Drinking Water Act - and send it to the President, perhaps as early as this week, for his signature. The bill bans the use of lead in drinking-water systems, directs the Environmental Protection Agency to issue standards within three years for 83 contaminants, and requires states to begin taking steps to protect underground sources of drinking water.
NEWS
November 17, 1998 | By Paul Nussbaum, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia drinking water meets or exceeds all federal standards, according to a new report mandated by the 1996 Clean Water Act. About 3 percent of homes tested showed elevated levels of lead in tap water, and some samples of water supplied to homes in South and West Philadelphia showed elevated levels of disinfectant by-products. But none of the tests showed overall contamination beyond the range permitted by the Environmental Protection Agency. The Philadelphia Water Department will release a detailed, six-page report in advertisements in local weekly newspapers later this month and will mail copies of the 1998 version of the report to all customers with billing statements by next June, said Joanne Dahme, general manager of public affairs for the department.
NEWS
January 20, 1988 | By Laurie Hollman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Senate President John F. Russo announced an ambitious plan yesterday to clean up contaminated drinking water, a problem that he called "by far the most important facing New Jersey today. " The cornerstone of the plan is a $200 million bond issue that would raise money to help New Jersey cities replace tainted water supplies. Price, Russo said at a news conference in the Senate chambers, is no object when it comes to clean water. "We have neglected the safety of our drinking water far too long," he said, adding that the problem of unsafe drinking water is obvious when "you can't hold up a glass of water and know whether it will quench your thirst, make you sick or kill you. " Russo, a Democrat, is from Ocean County, where several recent cases of contaminated water have arisen.
NEWS
August 14, 1988 | By Eileen Reinhard, Special to The Inquirer
Mount Laurel's Township Council is considering a ban on lawn watering or other landscaping uses of township potable water at future commercial and industrial developments because of the recent serious drain on the township's water supply. The summer's long drought, which resulted in water restrictions, has threatened the township's water supply and forced the mayor and council to think about ways to ease the strain that a seemingly endless calendar of 90- degree-plus days has placed on the township's capacity to supply drinkable water.
NEWS
October 5, 2010
TRENTON - Residents of Trenton and four suburbs are being advised to boil water before drinking it, because Trenton's water plant is having problems treating water because of the high level of the Delaware River. In addition to Trenton, residents of Ewing, Lawrence, Hopewell, and Hamilton are being advised to boil water. Officials said the heavy flow in the Delaware forced them to draw from a reserve. That reduced the volume of treated water to only one-quarter of the normal 28 million gallons per day as of Monday afternoon.
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NEWS
January 31, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, Staff Writer
Authorities now believe that a majority of the 4,200 gallons of diesel fuel that leaked from a generator spilled into the Schuylkill River, but are still confident that there is no threat to drinking water, fish or wildlife. Also, while the Schuylkill River Trail remains closed during the day, it has opened to the public in the evening, after cleanup crews have left for the day. On Friday, workers from Miller Environmental Group, the company contracted to do the cleanup, were still recovering oil from the river.
NEWS
January 26, 2016
By Dennis Miranda Most Philadelphia-area residents probably give little thought to the historic waterway to their north that feeds into Fairmount Park and the Schuylkill, or to its connection to the clean drinking water coming out of their faucets. But the city has just entered a partnership to restore this very important waterway, the Wissahickon Creek, and Montgomery County's other municipalities in the watershed should follow suit. The Wissahickon Valley is home to almost a quarter of a million people.
FOOD
January 22, 2016
Patti cakes Patti LaBelle's latest hit? Her sweet potato pie, which became a viral sensation after a fan uploaded a video of himself enjoying the dessert and singing his satisfaction. Now, the local superstar is back with a second, and third, helping: vanilla Bundt cake with vanilla icing, and a three-layer caramel cake with buttercream filling and caramel glaze. Both are manufactured for mass appeal but manage to hit the high notes. - Samantha Melamed Patti LaBelle Premium Caramel Cake, $13.94 at Walmart.
NEWS
January 16, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
Anna Okropiribce, 16, drinks from the water fountains at Northeast High School only when she's "desperate. " The water is warm and metallic-tasting. "It's pretty gross," she said. "Once, I filled up my water bottle, and the water wasn't clear. It was gray. I got scared. I was like, I don't know if I should drink this. " That's cause for concern, given that poor water intake is a likely factor in a startling phenomenon outlined in research published Thursday by a Children's Hospital of Philadelphia doctor.
NEWS
September 25, 2015 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
FIVE AMERICAN Airlines workers have accused the airline of using watercooler jugs to carry chemicals aboard planes to decontaminate lavatories - and then returning the jugs to commercial circulation to be refilled with drinking water and redistributed. In a lawsuit filed Monday in Philadelphia Common Pleas Court, the workers say the practice - known as "top-filling" - began in 2010 after the airline took over cleaning its own lavatories from an outside contractor. Normally, workers attach hoses from lavatory trucks on the tarmac to a parked plane's underbelly to pump toilet waste down into a container on the trucks, according to the lawsuit.
NEWS
September 20, 2015 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
A state drinking-water panel will again evaluate possible regulation of a chemical that had stirred health concerns in Moorestown, a move that legislators have tried to force through a bill awaiting action by Gov. Christie. The Drinking Water Quality Institute, which recommends water standards to the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, this week called for new information on the chemical, 1,2,3-trichloropropane (TCP). The group plans to reevaluate a standard it had proposed to the department in 2009 - a recommendation that was never acted upon - as well as more recent information on the chemical's health effects and water treatment options.
NEWS
August 21, 2015 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
The push to supply clean water to those affected by contamination spanning several Gloucester County towns is set to progress in West Deptford, where officials voted Wednesday night to move to connect certain properties with private wells to public water. The town, under an agreement with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection outlined at a township committee meeting, plans to install a new water-main extension to provide municipal water to three houses on Clement Drive, where high levels of the contaminant, perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA)
NEWS
August 9, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
For all the excitement over high-tech drugs and surgical procedures, clean drinking water is one of the top life-saving health advances of the modern age. Yet billions do not have access to it. According to a June report by the World Health Organization, at least 1.8 billion people still drink water contaminated with feces. Philadelphia was one of the first cities in the U.S. to have a public drinking water supply provided by the government. It was begun in 1801 after a series of yellow fever epidemics killed thousands of people.
NEWS
June 29, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kenneth E. Christy Sr. "was a very sensible, very reliable man," a friend, Carol Meloni, recalled. It helped to have that kind friend when you were riding Harleys all the way from South Jersey to Lake George, N.Y. Mr. Christy and his wife, Elizabeth, were on one bike and Mrs. Meloni and her husband were on the other. Twice in the late 1990s, the couples rode up and back in the motorcycle rally known as Americade. "It got a little sore after a while," she said, with a laugh.
NEWS
June 19, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
President Obama's late but welcome restoration of the government's power to keep polluters from dumping toxins upstream of drinking water supplies is undergoing its greatest challenge. Republicans and some Democrats are trying to scuttle the rule clarifying the extent of the government's powers under the Clean Water Act. Following the simple logic that poison dumped upstream will flow downstream and eventually into water taps, the new rule protects small streams, headwaters, and wetlands that are crucial to the quality of water supplies.
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