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Drinking Water

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NEWS
October 12, 2000 | By Susan Snyder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Philadelphia School District has begun providing bottled water to 70 schools that have yet to be tested for lead in their drinking water. "We've done this to allay people's concerns," said Barbara Farley, a district spokeswoman. The drinking-water taps have been shut off in those buildings and will stay off until they are determined to be safe through testing, she said. Last year, the school district signed an agreement with the city Health Department and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to begin testing for lead in water in all 295 district buildings.
NEWS
January 24, 1989 | By Sari Harrar, Special to The Inquirer
A farmer asked the Moorestown Township Council last night to help speed testing for hazardous chemical pollution in the groundwater on his property and other land in the eastern section of the township. "This is possibly affecting the drinking water of people in this area who are not on the municipal water system," asked farmer Greg Leonberg. "I would ask the township to help us in any way you can. Engineers for the General Electric Corp. this month asked Leonberg for permission to run tests on his 36-acre farm to determine how far chemicals have spread from underground leaks at GE's Government Electronic Systems Division on Borton Landing Road.
NEWS
April 23, 1989 | By Mark Jaffe, Inquirer Staff Writer
Every Monday morning, Laura Zalar and Ruby Burkett take a couple of gallon jugs of Clorox and hike about a mile to a small cinderblock bunker in the Cambria County woods. There they pour half a jug into a plastic 30-gallon tub and mix it with water. The solution runs out of a tube and slowly drips into the pipe that carries water from a pond in the woods to Onnalinda's 18 homes. And that is how this weathered, played-out coal hamlet disinfects its drinking water. "It's about the best we can do. . . . It seems to work all right," Zalar said.
NEWS
November 28, 2004 | By Dawn Fallik INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Scientists are finding traces of drugs, herbicides and fragrances - even birth-control hormones and weed killers - in the nation's drinking water. Where once experts thought the water-filtration process would eliminate the chemicals, new studies, including surveys in Philadelphia and New Jersey, have discovered otherwise. One water industry investigation into 18 drinking-water plants nationwide found the compounds in 14 of them. "Initially it was a surprise," said Joseph Bella, executive director for the Passaic Valley Water Commission, whose plant was the basis of the New Jersey study.
NEWS
April 19, 1994 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Even modern American cities like Philadelphia are vulnerable to microscopic killers in the water, environmental groups said yesterday as they urged Congress to support strict water quality controls. Citing the threat of microorganisms that defy chlorine and may escape detection, the groups pointed to federal Centers for Disease Control figures showing that 900,000 Americans are sickened by their drinking water each year. Last year a parasite killed 104 people and sickened 400,000 in Milwaukee.
NEWS
May 14, 1986 | By Charles Green, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Responding to concerns over groundwater contamination, the House yesterday voted overwhelmingly to strengthen the nation's main environmental law regulating drinking water supplies. The Senate is expected to approve the same measure - an overhaul of the 1974 Safe Drinking Water Act - and send it to the President, perhaps as early as this week, for his signature. The bill bans the use of lead in drinking-water systems, directs the Environmental Protection Agency to issue standards within three years for 83 contaminants, and requires states to begin taking steps to protect underground sources of drinking water.
NEWS
November 17, 1998 | By Paul Nussbaum, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia drinking water meets or exceeds all federal standards, according to a new report mandated by the 1996 Clean Water Act. About 3 percent of homes tested showed elevated levels of lead in tap water, and some samples of water supplied to homes in South and West Philadelphia showed elevated levels of disinfectant by-products. But none of the tests showed overall contamination beyond the range permitted by the Environmental Protection Agency. The Philadelphia Water Department will release a detailed, six-page report in advertisements in local weekly newspapers later this month and will mail copies of the 1998 version of the report to all customers with billing statements by next June, said Joanne Dahme, general manager of public affairs for the department.
NEWS
January 20, 1988 | By Laurie Hollman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Senate President John F. Russo announced an ambitious plan yesterday to clean up contaminated drinking water, a problem that he called "by far the most important facing New Jersey today. " The cornerstone of the plan is a $200 million bond issue that would raise money to help New Jersey cities replace tainted water supplies. Price, Russo said at a news conference in the Senate chambers, is no object when it comes to clean water. "We have neglected the safety of our drinking water far too long," he said, adding that the problem of unsafe drinking water is obvious when "you can't hold up a glass of water and know whether it will quench your thirst, make you sick or kill you. " Russo, a Democrat, is from Ocean County, where several recent cases of contaminated water have arisen.
NEWS
August 14, 1988 | By Eileen Reinhard, Special to The Inquirer
Mount Laurel's Township Council is considering a ban on lawn watering or other landscaping uses of township potable water at future commercial and industrial developments because of the recent serious drain on the township's water supply. The summer's long drought, which resulted in water restrictions, has threatened the township's water supply and forced the mayor and council to think about ways to ease the strain that a seemingly endless calendar of 90- degree-plus days has placed on the township's capacity to supply drinkable water.
NEWS
October 5, 2010
TRENTON - Residents of Trenton and four suburbs are being advised to boil water before drinking it, because Trenton's water plant is having problems treating water because of the high level of the Delaware River. In addition to Trenton, residents of Ewing, Lawrence, Hopewell, and Hamilton are being advised to boil water. Officials said the heavy flow in the Delaware forced them to draw from a reserve. That reduced the volume of treated water to only one-quarter of the normal 28 million gallons per day as of Monday afternoon.
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NEWS
June 19, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
President Obama's late but welcome restoration of the government's power to keep polluters from dumping toxins upstream of drinking water supplies is undergoing its greatest challenge. Republicans and some Democrats are trying to scuttle the rule clarifying the extent of the government's powers under the Clean Water Act. Following the simple logic that poison dumped upstream will flow downstream and eventually into water taps, the new rule protects small streams, headwaters, and wetlands that are crucial to the quality of water supplies.
NEWS
June 7, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
A team of sixth graders in Chester County is to go up against 19 other teams this month in a national competition that asks students to use science, technology, engineering, and math to solve problems in their communities. The three East Vincent Township students, who studied the quality and taste of their school's drinking water, are the only Pennsylvania students in the national contest. The other national finalists in the Northeastern United States are from Massachusetts, New York, and Virginia.
NEWS
June 3, 2015 | Wendy Ruderman, Daily News Staff Writer
IT'S SUNDAY about 7 p.m., a time when most people try to wring out that last drip of relaxation before the start of another workweek. Nope. Not the high-octane "Jim Kenney for Mayor" team. Instead of kicking back, Kenney's campaign spokeswoman, Lauren Hitt, was at her computer, alerting the media to a clean-water advocacy event: "Kenney joins representatives from the EPA, Philadelphia Water Department and PennEnvironment to discuss new, historic clean water protections for Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2015 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Count down to ¡Uno, Dos, Tres con Andrés! Saturday at World Cafe Live. Pick up some Spanish and learn about Latin culture during this interactive children's show. Singer-songwriter Andres Salguero will help kids get their boogie on to "La Bamba," let them sing along, and help them sound out rhythms. ¡Uno, Dos, Tres con Andrés!, 11:30 a.m. Saturday at World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut St. Doors open at 11 a.m. Tickets are $10 for kids and adults. Information: 215-222-1400 or www.worldcafelive.com . Washing water at the water works The Fairmount Water Works begins a new Science Saturdays program, "The Schuylkill River Comes Clean: All About Philly's Drinking Water," at which you can learn how river water is cleaned and then makes its way to your faucet, or to your school, or to the corner store.
NEWS
February 26, 2015 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Navy could be paying upwards of $12 million to filter contaminated drinking water around former military bases in Montgomery and Bucks Counties. Elevated levels of perflourinated compounds, which have been linked to cancer and reproductive issues, were found last year in several drinking water wells in Horsham, Warrington, and Warminster. At an open house in Horsham Wednesday, local officials, and Navy and Environmental Protection Agency representatives said they are making progress on fixing the problem.
NEWS
November 2, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
The free bottled water that has been offered for months in Paulsboro in response to a contaminant in the water supply will come to an end Saturday. The discontinuation follows a letter from the state Department of Environmental Protection to the borough Water Department last month lifting a water advisory. The department "does not believe it is necessary to continue the restriction on the consumption of drinking water in Paulsboro," said the Oct. 3 letter from Fred Sickels, director of the DEP's Division of Water Supply and Geoscience.
NEWS
August 15, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Early hype for WetLand , a live-in art installation by Mary Mattingly commissioned for the 2014 Fringe Festival, described it as a "visually stunning utopic" structure of green-roofed geodesic domes floating serenely on a barge. But the artwork/artist residence/community hub that Mattingly, previously of Brooklyn and currently of Penn's Landing, has been building since July is quite different: It is a ramshackle take on a postdiluvian rowhouse, listing and sinking into the Delaware River.
NEWS
June 2, 2014
The George Washington Bridge lane-closing scandal isn't the only reason some people may think vindictive is Gov. Christie's middle name. Look at what he's doing to the Pinelands Commission. Christie has fired two commissioners who in January voted against letting South Jersey Gas run a 22-mile pipeline through the environmentally sensitive forest. But he wasn't the only one to retaliate. In April, freeholders replaced Cumberland County's representative on the commission, who also voted against the pipeline, and replaced her with a politically connected real estate agent.
NEWS
February 13, 2014 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
IN 2012, A TRAIN derailment spewed a toxic cloud over the small South Jersey town of Paulsboro, prompting safety concerns and major lawsuits over the chemical industry there. Now more lawsuits are being filed over an invisible, unrelated threat some say is lurking in Paulsboro's water supply. "This isn't just a concern for Paulsboro, it's for everybody in the area," attorney David Cedar said yesterday. Cedar and his firm are representing three Paulsboro families against Solvay Polymers, a plastics and chemicals manufacturer in nearby West Deptford, claiming the company contaminated drinking water with dangerous chemicals.
NEWS
January 25, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
PAULSBORO Days after Paulsboro pleaded for state intervention to deal with a contaminated water supply, the state Department of Environmental Protection has advised residents to use bottled water when feeding children up to age 1. Paulsboro officials were expected to post the information to the borough's website Friday, and to issue a letter from the mayor along with the state guidance through the mail. The borough's Well No. 7, a primary water source, has elevated levels of a certain type of perfluorinated compound (PFC)
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