CollectionsDrinking Water
IN THE NEWS

Drinking Water

NEWS
March 28, 2011 | By Amy Worden, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - Amid concerns of fallout from Japan's damaged nuclear plants reaching the United States, tests performed on public drinking-water supplies throughout Pennsylvania found no elevated levels of radioactivity, Gov. Corbett said Monday. But low concentrations of iodine 131 - a radioactive byproduct of nuclear fission - have been detected in rainwater at sites throughout the state, he said. "The bottom line is the drinking water is safe," said Corbett, whose announcement in the Capitol, 10 miles from Three Mile Island, came on the 32d anniversary of the nation's worst nuclear accident.
NEWS
August 9, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Government standards for drinking-water quality fail to protect the health of half the population, consumer advocate Ralph Nader said yesterday. The Environmental Protection Agency has assumed in its calculations that people consume at most two liters of water - about two quarts - per day, even though "half the U.S. adult population drinks more than two liters of water per capita per day, and the EPA knows this," Nader said in a statement. The EPA's drinking-water standards govern the amounts of contaminants permitted in the water.
NEWS
November 16, 1986 | By Fen Montaigne, Inquirer Staff Writer
Federal and state officials say that the problem of lead contamination in drinking water is of increasing concern, both here and throughout the nation. In Philadelphia and its suburbs, for example,tests in new homes have shown that the water that first pours out of bathroom and kitchen faucets every morning often contains potentially harmful amounts of lead. In Harrisburg, city officials have sent a series of notices to residents advising them to run tap water for at least three minutes before taking a drink.
NEWS
May 8, 1991 | By Mark Jaffe, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Environmental Protection Agency issued new rules yesterday aimed at lowering the amount of potentially dangerous lead in the nation's drinking water. The new regulations will help reduce lead exposures for 130 million Americans and reduce to safe levels the lead in the blood of 600,000 children, according to the agency. Low levels of the toxic metal have been linked to nerve and behavior disorders in children. In larger doses, lead can damage kidneys, raise blood pressure and impair reproduction in adults.
NEWS
June 21, 1991 | By Ross Kerber, Special to The Inquirer
Federal officials have proposed relaxing the standard for radium contamination in drinking water, meaning thousands of private wells in Pennsylvania and New Jersey that previously had been considered unsafe suddenly would become acceptable. Perhaps the most immediate impact of the new guidelines would be on a handful of public water systems in South Jersey that, unlike the private wells, are subject to government regulation. They will now find it easier to begin using municipal wells that draw up radium-tainted water.
NEWS
September 2, 2011 | By Jeremy Roebuck, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Final estimates on exactly how many millions of gallons of raw sewage spilled into the Schuylkill from a water main break in Reading could be determined as soon as next week. But the risk period for those whose downriver public water systems that draw directly from the waterway has passed, state environmental regulators said Friday. "I was out doing fecal counts on the river today," said Krissy Pennypacker, laboratory supervisor for the Pottstown water system. "They've dropped off tremendously in the last couple of days.
NEWS
February 18, 1986 | By HOWARD SCHNEIDER, Daily News Staff Writer
They cleared their palates with Keebler "Sea Toast" crackers, sipped the next sample with an expert's care, swished the liquid in their mouths and swallowed. "Musty" said one. "A plastic aftertaste," mused another. "Just like the rest," said a reporter, later told he suffered from a deadening of the senses called "anosmia. " Welcome to Philadelphia's Official Water Taste Test, a biweekly gathering of trained aquaphiles who judge whether the city's water is redolent of sparkling streams or storm-drain overflow, whether it tastes like Perrier or Pennzoil.
NEWS
September 27, 1993 | By Mark Jaffe, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The safety of the nation's drinking water supplies is being jeopardized by a cascade of violations and lax enforcement of regulations, according to a review of federal records by the Natural Resources Defense Council. The national environmental group said its study indicated that in one recent two-year period, there were 250,000 violations of the federal Safe Drinking Water Act. "The maintenance of water systems has been completely hit-or-miss," said Erik Olsen, a council attorney.
NEWS
September 27, 1995 | By Mark Jaffe, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Cryptosporidium - a microscopic parasite that causes vomiting, diarrhea and fever - has been detected at low levels in Philadelphia tap water, the city Water Department said yesterday. The presence of the single-cell animal in the drinking water poses no immediate threat to the majority of people, city health and water officials said. However, the Philadelphia Health Department is advising people with immune system problems - such as AIDS - and those suffering the side effects of chemotherapy to consult their doctors.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|