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Drinking Water

NEWS
September 20, 1992 | By Diane Struzzi, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Caught between the possibility of big fines and the logistics of adhering to strict federal regulations, the Upper Moreland-Hatboro Joint Sewer Authority's industrial users say impending restrictions on their pretreatment programs could put them out of business. Not to mention that the technology to meet regulations under consideration by the federal Environmental Protection Agency does not exist, say industry representatives and members of the authority. "It's clear nobody will be in business, because we can't meet those regulations," Andy Strange, director of engineering at Elastomeric Technologies Inc. in Willow Grove, said during a meeting requested by the joint sewer authority to discuss the regulations.
NEWS
April 5, 2005 | By Dwight Ott and Melanie Burney INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
More than 50,000 Camden residents, as well as such commercial customers as restaurants, were warned last night to boil their water for the next 48 hours after a 30-inch sewage pipe was crushed. Because of the water emergency, all of Camden's public schools will be closed today, Board of Education President Philip E. Freeman Sr. said late last night. They will remain closed, Freeman said, "until we know the water is safe. " The problem occurred about 10 a.m. yesterday while workers for a private contractor overhauling the city's water infrastructure were changing a main valve near East State Street and River Road in Cramer Hill.
NEWS
January 1, 1995 | By Christine Bahls, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The unwieldy, lengthy process of cleaning up Hough's Creek began last week, as county environmental officials took stock of just how much damage nearly 500 gallons of leaked home heating oil did to the creek and soil. The initial assessment: The damage isn't really too bad. Dead fish have not been seen, and no drinking water has turned up tainted, said David Noll, an environmental protection specialist with the Bucks County Department of Health. The leak was discovered Monday night on the property of a vacant home on Scott Drive, and it found its way to the Delaware River, where a sheen was observed Monday.
NEWS
June 2, 1995 | By Mark Jaffe, Rich Henson and Judy Baehr, FOR THE INQUIRER
Contaminants - from fecal wastes to chlorinated chemicals and heavy metals - are occasionally finding their way into drinking water around the region and the nation, according to federal documents. The Environmental Protection Agency data show that in the last two years, there have been dozens of violations of the Safe Water Drinking Act in the Philadelphia region. Nationally, the EPA data show that during 1993 and 1994, thousands of violations occurred in water systems serving a total of 53 million people across the country.
NEWS
October 4, 2000 | By Susan Snyder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Philadelphia teachers' union accused the school district yesterday of moving too slowly in its efforts to remedy the problem of lead in school drinking water. "For children to be exposed to lead is unacceptable," Jerry Jordan, the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers' chief of staff, said at a news conference outside the Gompers School in the Overbrook section. "We have a large number of female teachers of childbearing age . . . and young ladies in high school who may be pregnant.
NEWS
September 27, 2003 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Water-logged ladies and gentlemen: We have a record. The three reservoirs at the head of the Delaware River - which supply drinking water to Philadelphia, New York City and South Jersey - are the fullest they have ever been at this time of year. At 272.3 billion gallons, they are actually more than full, according to the Delaware River Basin Commission. The Cannonsville, Pepacton and Neversink Reservoirs, held back by earthen dams in upstate New York, only have combined room for 271 billion gallons.
NEWS
October 24, 1993 | By Jan Hefler, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Under an alternative water-supply plan submitted to the state last week, in a couple of years borough residents could be drinking water from Camden. But local officials doubt the plan will be needed, even though the borough's water supply will be rationed starting in September 1995. The state Department of Environmental Protection and Energy last month placed limits on the amount of water that will be drawn at that time from the diminishing Potomac-Raritan-Magothy Aquifer, which stretches beneath Burlington, Camden and Gloucester Counties.
NEWS
February 5, 2002 | By Will Van Sant INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Camden residents who were supplied drinking water from a contaminated well field in Pennsauken that is now a federal Superfund site are gearing up for legal action. On Friday, attorneys sent letters to Camden officials and the Pennsauken Sanitary Landfill - suspected of being one source among many for the well pollution - naming them as targets of a projected class-action lawsuit on behalf of residents. Although no lawsuit has been filed, plaintiff's attorneys are required to notify government bodies to be named in such actions.
NEWS
April 28, 1996 | By Natalie Pompilio, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Groups of youths carrying cans of spray paint spread throughout the eastern end of the township last Saturday, their path clearly marked by the bluefish they left in their wake. But these were not vandals. These youths were taking part in an environmental-awareness project organized by the Pompeston Creek Watershed Association. The purpose was to remind residents that runoff from such everyday items as the soap they use to wash their cars or the fertilizer they put on their lawns does not just go away when it goes down the drain.
NEWS
March 13, 2003 | By Melanie Burney and Dwight Ott INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
For more than two years, community activists have tried to make their case that drinking water at many city schools is contaminated with high levels of lead. Yesterday, they won a small legal victory when a judge ordered the Camden School District to turn over results for all lead testing since 1992. The activists had filed a sweeping federal lawsuit earlier in the day to force South Jersey's largest school district to remove contaminated water coolers and fountains and to provide bottled water to its 18,500 students.
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