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Drinking Water

NEWS
June 28, 2016
ISSUE | WATER QUALITY Testing free in Philly The Philadelphia Water Department has been and continues to be fully in compliance with regulations to control lead and copper in drinking water, as determined by the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection ("Time to get the lead out," Thursday). The Water Department will continue to work closely with the DEP to refine sampling protocols. The department has long offered free testing in homes for lead. Our consistent education and outreach - in public meetings, in brochures, on the internet, and on social media - have focused on the actions customers can take to ensure they are receiving clean and healthy drinking water from our mains.
NEWS
June 24, 2016
Philadelphia's water supply doesn't have the high lead levels that endangered public health in Flint, Mich., but the city could do a better job of informing residents of the potential danger of lead leached from pipes in older homes. Lead is a quiet poison that causes long-term damage to almost every system in the body while typically showing no obvious symptoms. Philadelphia children routinely test high for lead levels. Until recently, this was attributed almost exclusively to lead paint, but growing concern about lead-pipe corrosion has brought more attention to the necessity of testing drinking water.
NEWS
June 23, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal, Staff Writer
The state Department of Environmental Protection is trying to determine the source of an unacceptable level of contamination found in drinking water in Doylestown, officials said Tuesday. A public drinking well along Easton Road in the Cross Keys area was shut down last month after inspectors found levels of perfluorinated compounds higher than newly announced federal standards. Public drinking water there is now safe, officials said. But they are trying to identify how the well became contaminated with PFOS and PFOA.
NEWS
June 20, 2016 | By Justine McDaniel and Laura McCrystal, Staff Writers
When the planes burned, the kids would come out. Hope Grosse and her siblings would run down their Warminster street and rubberneck amid shrieking sirens. They would watch Navy firefighters shoot a dense white foam from hoses, smothering the flames that leapt up from the fenced-off lot. When the blackened plane was cool, the children would climb the fence and jump into the burned-out cockpit, pretending to be pilots, Grosse recounted. The plane, and the field where the Navy conducted drills, was also a playground for the Kirk Road kids back in the 1970s and '80s.
NEWS
June 20, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal and Justine McDaniel, STAFF WRITERS
As lawmakers demanded answers this spring about water contamination in Bucks and Montgomery Counties, Paul Lutz began chemotherapy. Lutz does not live in the area with the tainted drinking water, which came from chemicals used on naval air bases. But he worked at the Willow Grove Naval Air Station as a flight engineer. Now 44 and retired from the military, he has multiple myeloma. As water contamination near the base attracts scrutiny, Lutz and others who worked there wonder: What about us?
NEWS
June 18, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, STAFF WRITER
Aqua America Inc., the Bryn Mawr water utility, has hired a 20-year veteran of the Philadelphia Water Department as its chief environmental officer. Christopher S. Crockett, the department's deputy commissioner, will be responsible for overseeing water quality and environmental compliance for all Aqua America's drinking water and wastewater systems in eight states. He will also manage Aqua's in-house laboratory and the company's water-quality services and water-resources engineering departments.
NEWS
May 26, 2016 | By Justine McDaniel, Staff Writer
Less than a week after new federal guidelines effectively doubled the number of contaminated public water wells near the former naval air bases at Willow Grove and Warminster, residents lined up out the door for an open house with environmental and military officials. "What are they going to do? How bad is it?" asked Sherri Meier, 50, of Warminster, who said she did not want to drink tap water even though the public water supply has been deemed safe. For some among those who packed the room at the Horsham Township Community Center and roamed among the information tables, answers were wanting.
NEWS
May 25, 2016 | By Justine McDaniel and Laura McCrystal, STAFF WRITERS
Eight more wells that supply public drinking water have been shut down in Bucks and Montgomery Counties, and dozens of private wells have been called into question, after the Environmental Protection Agency issued more stringent guidelines on water contamination last week. In total, 16 public wells have been closed in the two counties since the discovery two years ago that drinking water in Horsham, Warminster, and Warrington Townships had been tainted by firefighting foams. The chemicals were used over decades in the mid- to late 20th century at now-shuttered naval air bases in the area.
NEWS
May 21, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal, STAFF WRITER lmccrystal@phillynews.com 610-313-8116 @Lmccrystal
State officials on Thursday began offering free bottled water to people who live near the former naval air stations in Montgomery and Bucks Counties, which are blamed for contaminating public drinking wells. The distribution of as many as two cases per day to residents in Warminster, Warrington, and Horsham Townships is a "precautionary action," Gov. Wolf said in a statement announcing the initiative. It occurred on the same day that federal officials released new guidelines that set a lower bar for the level of acceptable water contamination than what has been used as the standard in Horsham and Warminster.
NEWS
May 2, 2016 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
The water crisis in Flint, Mich., where residents unknowingly drank water with harmful levels of lead, has brought new scrutiny to public water-supply systems. How does Philadelphia's water rate? Officials will address that question at the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University on Tuesday evening. Debra McCarty, the new commissioner of the Philadelphia Water Department, will be joined by Lynn Thorp, national campaigns director for Clean Water Action, and Jerry Fagliano, chair of the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health at Drexel University's Dornsife School of Public Health.
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