CollectionsDrinking Water
IN THE NEWS

Drinking Water

NEWS
June 18, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, STAFF WRITER
Aqua America Inc., the Bryn Mawr water utility, has hired a 20-year veteran of the Philadelphia Water Department as its chief environmental officer. Christopher S. Crockett, the department's deputy commissioner, will be responsible for overseeing water quality and environmental compliance for all Aqua America's drinking water and wastewater systems in eight states. He will also manage Aqua's in-house laboratory and the company's water-quality services and water-resources engineering departments.
NEWS
May 26, 2016 | By Justine McDaniel, Staff Writer
Less than a week after new federal guidelines effectively doubled the number of contaminated public water wells near the former naval air bases at Willow Grove and Warminster, residents lined up out the door for an open house with environmental and military officials. "What are they going to do? How bad is it?" asked Sherri Meier, 50, of Warminster, who said she did not want to drink tap water even though the public water supply has been deemed safe. For some among those who packed the room at the Horsham Township Community Center and roamed among the information tables, answers were wanting.
NEWS
May 25, 2016 | By Justine McDaniel and Laura McCrystal, STAFF WRITERS
Eight more wells that supply public drinking water have been shut down in Bucks and Montgomery Counties, and dozens of private wells have been called into question, after the Environmental Protection Agency issued more stringent guidelines on water contamination last week. In total, 16 public wells have been closed in the two counties since the discovery two years ago that drinking water in Horsham, Warminster, and Warrington Townships had been tainted by firefighting foams. The chemicals were used over decades in the mid- to late 20th century at now-shuttered naval air bases in the area.
NEWS
May 21, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal, STAFF WRITER lmccrystal@phillynews.com 610-313-8116 @Lmccrystal
State officials on Thursday began offering free bottled water to people who live near the former naval air stations in Montgomery and Bucks Counties, which are blamed for contaminating public drinking wells. The distribution of as many as two cases per day to residents in Warminster, Warrington, and Horsham Townships is a "precautionary action," Gov. Wolf said in a statement announcing the initiative. It occurred on the same day that federal officials released new guidelines that set a lower bar for the level of acceptable water contamination than what has been used as the standard in Horsham and Warminster.
NEWS
May 2, 2016 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
The water crisis in Flint, Mich., where residents unknowingly drank water with harmful levels of lead, has brought new scrutiny to public water-supply systems. How does Philadelphia's water rate? Officials will address that question at the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University on Tuesday evening. Debra McCarty, the new commissioner of the Philadelphia Water Department, will be joined by Lynn Thorp, national campaigns director for Clean Water Action, and Jerry Fagliano, chair of the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health at Drexel University's Dornsife School of Public Health.
NEWS
May 1, 2016
Twenty-four Senate Democrats are asking their colleagues in Congress to help schools pay for the testing of lead levels in drinking water, calling it an investment to ensure the health and safety of the nation's children. The move is the result of the drinking-water crisis in Flint, Mich., which helped shine a light on a loophole in federal law that exempts many schools from having to test their water for lead contamination. After revelations that the drinking water in nearly half of Newark's public schools had elevated levels of lead, New Jersey lawmakers have proposed requiring every school in the state to test its water for the contaminant.
NEWS
April 16, 2016
By Joseph M. Manko In recent weeks, the issue of safe drinking water has been unusually conspicuous, thanks to headlines emanating from Flint, Mich., and elsewhere. Philadelphians have good reason to be proud of their city's robust tradition of watershed protection and commitment to providing safe, top-quality drinking water. That commitment was first made 200 years ago, when the city's government, business, and community leaders decided on an innovative plan to create a public waterworks system that would guarantee safe drinking water for the citizens of Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 13, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal, Staff Writer
Standing outside a Montgomery County military base where chemicals from firefighting foam has contaminated public drinking water, two local congressmen made a bipartisan appeal Monday for stricter drinking-water regulations. "Residents are understandably concerned these chemicals are to blame for their health concerns," said Rep. Brendan Boyle (D., Pa.). Boyle traveled Monday to Naval Air Station Willow Grove with Republican Rep. Patrick Meehan to apply public pressure to the Environmental Protection Agency to finalize new standards for safe levels of chemicals in drinking water.
NEWS
April 9, 2016
New Jersey legislators are trying to correct an oversight in the state's environmental laws, which do not require schools to regularly test their water for lead. Unacceptable levels of lead have been found in the water at 30 of Newark's 67 public schools, which have shut down their water fountains. The discovery raises questions about water quality in schools around the state. A bill sponsored by Senate President Stephen Sweeney (D., Gloucester) and Sens. Ron Rice and Teresa Ruiz (both D., Essex)
NEWS
April 9, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, STAFF WRITER
Cabot Oil & Gas Corp. on Thursday asked a federal magistrate to set aside a Scranton jury verdict last month that awarded two Dimock, Pa., families $4.24 million for their claims that Cabot's shale-gas operations contaminated their drinking water. The gas driller alleged that misconduct by the families' attorney, Leslie Lewis, tainted the jury, and that the testimony of two neighbors who had earlier signed settlements and non-disclosure agreements with Cabot should not have been permitted.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|