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Drinking Water

NEWS
January 25, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
PAULSBORO Days after Paulsboro pleaded for state intervention to deal with a contaminated water supply, the state Department of Environmental Protection has advised residents to use bottled water when feeding children up to age 1. Paulsboro officials were expected to post the information to the borough's website Friday, and to issue a letter from the mayor along with the state guidance through the mail. The borough's Well No. 7, a primary water source, has elevated levels of a certain type of perfluorinated compound (PFC)
NEWS
July 18, 2013 | By Marcia Dunn, Associated Press
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In one of the most harrowing spacewalks in decades, an astronaut had to rush back into the International Space Station on Tuesday after a mysterious water leak inside his helmet robbed him of the ability to speak or hear and could have caused him to choke or even drown. Italian Luca Parmitano was reported to be fine after the dangerous episode, which might have been caused by a leak in the cooling system of his suit. His spacewalking partner, American Christopher Cassidy, had to help him inside after NASA quickly aborted the spacewalk.
NEWS
May 29, 2013
By Lloyd Brown With all eyes on the Delaware River Basin Commission as it considers lifting the moratorium on hydraulic fracturing in the Delaware River Basin, we have a unique opportunity to protect our precious resources. This includes completing environmental studies to better understand the impacts of fracking. We must learn from other watersheds and act to protect our drinking water and the future of the popular national parks along the Delaware River. While the fracking boom may limit our dependence on foreign oil and gas, it may also result in problems for lands adjacent to drilling and fracking operations.
NEWS
April 5, 2013
THIS IS A letter in response to the editorial "Liquid Assets: A bottled-water ban has merit, but it's not crystal clear. " I sincerely congratulate the Daily News for having published an article which so articulately elucidates the problems of allowing national parks to continue to sell bottled water. As the article states, when discussing the issue of the sale of bottled water, there inevitably gets asked the question of whether water should be seen and treated federally as a human right.
NEWS
February 22, 2013 | By Tami Abdollah, Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - British tourist Michael Baugh and his wife said water had only trickled for days as they brushed their teeth, showered and drank from the taps at the Cecil Hotel in downtown Los Angeles, but they could not have imagined the disturbing reason. The body of a Canadian woman was later discovered at the bottom of one of four cisterns on the roof of the historic hotel near Skid Row. The tanks provide water for hotel taps and would have been used by guests for washing and drinking.
NEWS
December 8, 2012 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Levels of radioactive iodine-131 in a city drinking-water intake rose to their highest level yet earlier this year. However, city and state officials noted the spike, measured Oct. 17 at the Belmont water plant, is a one-time event. It's not a public health concern, they said, and the water remains safe to drink. "The biggest message is that it's not a health issue," said David Allard, director of the state Department of Environmental Protection's Bureau of Radiation Protection.
NEWS
July 17, 2012 | Daily News Editorial
LAST WEEK, DUKE University released a study on water quality in the Marcellus Shale region. Many Pennsylvanians concerned about the state's new industry of gas drilling will be interested in the findings of this study. Here's a sampling of headlines from the media coverage: Marcellus Shale study claims gas drilling did not contaminate drinking-water wells; New research shows no Marcellus Shale pollution; Pennsylvania fracking can put water at risk, Duke study finds; Yet another study confirms fracking can pollute groundwater; New study: Fluids from Marcellus Shale likely seeping into Pa. drinking water; Findings are mixed in fracking-water study.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2012 | Meeri Kim
Cranberry juice has long been touted as an effective home remedy for preventing pesky, painful urinary tract infections, but now the folklore has more science to back it up. A review of studies in last week's Archives of Internal Medicine found that consuming cranberry products can help prevent the infections, especially for women who have had them before. Researchers from National Taiwan University found that cranberry users — either in juice or pill form — were 38 percent less likely to develop urinary tract infections compared to nonusers.
NEWS
July 11, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
The eleventh-hour surprise decision by Pennsylvania lawmakers to ban natural-gas exploration across a swath of suburban Philadelphia is another sign that the region isn't ready for drilling rigs. It's possible that it never will be. In pushing through a drilling ban across a little-known rock formation in Bucks and Montgomery Counties, State Sen. Charles McIlhinney (R., Bucks) said he wanted to assure that communities were protected while experts evaluate a new report that identifies gas reserves under the two counties.
NEWS
July 10, 2012 | By Paula Reed Ward, PITTSBURGH POST-GAZETTE
A Duke University study that examined the possibility that Marcellus Shale drilling in northeastern Pennsylvania contaminates drinking water concluded that pathways in rock formations that allowed salinated water into shallow aquifers were naturally occurring and not a result of hydraulic fracturing. Still, the authors warned in the study published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that those naturally occurring pathways could allow chemicals and contaminated water caused by fracking also to travel into the drinking water supply.
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