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Drinking Water

NEWS
September 20, 2015 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
A state drinking-water panel will again evaluate possible regulation of a chemical that had stirred health concerns in Moorestown, a move that legislators have tried to force through a bill awaiting action by Gov. Christie. The Drinking Water Quality Institute, which recommends water standards to the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, this week called for new information on the chemical, 1,2,3-trichloropropane (TCP). The group plans to reevaluate a standard it had proposed to the department in 2009 - a recommendation that was never acted upon - as well as more recent information on the chemical's health effects and water treatment options.
NEWS
August 21, 2015 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
The push to supply clean water to those affected by contamination spanning several Gloucester County towns is set to progress in West Deptford, where officials voted Wednesday night to move to connect certain properties with private wells to public water. The town, under an agreement with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection outlined at a township committee meeting, plans to install a new water-main extension to provide municipal water to three houses on Clement Drive, where high levels of the contaminant, perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA)
NEWS
August 9, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
For all the excitement over high-tech drugs and surgical procedures, clean drinking water is one of the top life-saving health advances of the modern age. Yet billions do not have access to it. According to a June report by the World Health Organization, at least 1.8 billion people still drink water contaminated with feces. Philadelphia was one of the first cities in the U.S. to have a public drinking water supply provided by the government. It was begun in 1801 after a series of yellow fever epidemics killed thousands of people.
NEWS
June 29, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kenneth E. Christy Sr. "was a very sensible, very reliable man," a friend, Carol Meloni, recalled. It helped to have that kind friend when you were riding Harleys all the way from South Jersey to Lake George, N.Y. Mr. Christy and his wife, Elizabeth, were on one bike and Mrs. Meloni and her husband were on the other. Twice in the late 1990s, the couples rode up and back in the motorcycle rally known as Americade. "It got a little sore after a while," she said, with a laugh.
NEWS
June 19, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
President Obama's late but welcome restoration of the government's power to keep polluters from dumping toxins upstream of drinking water supplies is undergoing its greatest challenge. Republicans and some Democrats are trying to scuttle the rule clarifying the extent of the government's powers under the Clean Water Act. Following the simple logic that poison dumped upstream will flow downstream and eventually into water taps, the new rule protects small streams, headwaters, and wetlands that are crucial to the quality of water supplies.
NEWS
June 7, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
A team of sixth graders in Chester County is to go up against 19 other teams this month in a national competition that asks students to use science, technology, engineering, and math to solve problems in their communities. The three East Vincent Township students, who studied the quality and taste of their school's drinking water, are the only Pennsylvania students in the national contest. The other national finalists in the Northeastern United States are from Massachusetts, New York, and Virginia.
NEWS
June 3, 2015 | Wendy Ruderman, Daily News Staff Writer
IT'S SUNDAY about 7 p.m., a time when most people try to wring out that last drip of relaxation before the start of another workweek. Nope. Not the high-octane "Jim Kenney for Mayor" team. Instead of kicking back, Kenney's campaign spokeswoman, Lauren Hitt, was at her computer, alerting the media to a clean-water advocacy event: "Kenney joins representatives from the EPA, Philadelphia Water Department and PennEnvironment to discuss new, historic clean water protections for Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2015 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Count down to ¡Uno, Dos, Tres con Andrés! Saturday at World Cafe Live. Pick up some Spanish and learn about Latin culture during this interactive children's show. Singer-songwriter Andres Salguero will help kids get their boogie on to "La Bamba," let them sing along, and help them sound out rhythms. ¡Uno, Dos, Tres con Andrés!, 11:30 a.m. Saturday at World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut St. Doors open at 11 a.m. Tickets are $10 for kids and adults. Information: 215-222-1400 or www.worldcafelive.com . Washing water at the water works The Fairmount Water Works begins a new Science Saturdays program, "The Schuylkill River Comes Clean: All About Philly's Drinking Water," at which you can learn how river water is cleaned and then makes its way to your faucet, or to your school, or to the corner store.
NEWS
February 26, 2015 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Navy could be paying upwards of $12 million to filter contaminated drinking water around former military bases in Montgomery and Bucks Counties. Elevated levels of perflourinated compounds, which have been linked to cancer and reproductive issues, were found last year in several drinking water wells in Horsham, Warrington, and Warminster. At an open house in Horsham Wednesday, local officials, and Navy and Environmental Protection Agency representatives said they are making progress on fixing the problem.
NEWS
November 2, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
The free bottled water that has been offered for months in Paulsboro in response to a contaminant in the water supply will come to an end Saturday. The discontinuation follows a letter from the state Department of Environmental Protection to the borough Water Department last month lifting a water advisory. The department "does not believe it is necessary to continue the restriction on the consumption of drinking water in Paulsboro," said the Oct. 3 letter from Fred Sickels, director of the DEP's Division of Water Supply and Geoscience.
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