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NEWS
March 11, 2016
ISSUE | WATER QUALITY Stop the pipeline The PennEast Pipeline Co. has applied for a water permit from the Delaware River Basin Commission that would allow its destructive pipeline to run through the region. According to the application, the company plans to discharge or withdraw more than 45 million gallons of water. The 110-mile pipeline would cut through the Delaware River valley, beginning in Pennsylvania and crossing the river and 87 other waterways, including protected waters, into Hopewell Township, N.J. The application process could take up to a year, and, if rejected, the DRBC could help stop the pipeline.
NEWS
March 10, 2016
New Jersey's Pinelands Commission was once a respected, independent steward of a forest that filters the drinking water for millions in the region. But political manipulation has turned it into an ineffective agency that looks the other way when the preserve's delicate balance is threatened. The latest annual report of the Pinelands Preservation Alliance rightly notes that the forest is facing its greatest threat in decades because the commission simply is not doing its job. The panel's abdication is astounding given national concern over the lead-laden water that is threatening the health of Flint, Mich., residents.
NEWS
March 5, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal, Staff Writer
Is toxic water in the vicinity of the former Naval Air Station Willow Grove and the Naval Air Warfare Center in Warminster making people sick? That's the concern three area congressmen raised Thursday in a letter to the Navy demanding answers about the government's knowledge of the water issues. "Residents who consumed the contaminated water have understandable concern that these chemicals, which studies show can cause serious illness, are the cause of their own health conditions," wrote U.S. Reps.
NEWS
February 19, 2016 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - Future control of its drinking water continued to vex this beleaguered seaside city Wednesday, as it faced a looming state takeover and unrelenting outside interest in its water utility. The City Council was set to vote on bringing the water authority under direct city control in an effort to both monetize it and stave off private interests. But after a closed-door meeting, the council voted to delay any vote for 90 days. Meanwhile, the current head of the Municipal Utility Authority, G. Bruce Ward, made a plea to keep the department an independent authority - but also said he planned to seek a "private partner" who would kick in $100 million to the authority.
NEWS
February 6, 2016 | By Brian X. McCrone, STAFF WRITER
In response to increasing inquiries about lead poisoning - attention largely spurred by the health crisis in Flint, Mich. - Pennsylvania state health officials Thursday released information and guidelines to help reduce the risk of exposure. The primary source of lead poisoning is not from water, but rather from aging, deteriorating lead-based paint, the state Health Department said. Although lead paint was banned in 1978, many older homes still contain the toxic substance.
NEWS
February 4, 2016 | By Allison Steele, Staff Writer
A few coaches with Camden's Whitman Park Tigers youth football program were sitting around after a recent meeting, watching a news story about the water-contamination crisis in Flint, Mich., when they had an idea. "We said, 'We've got to do something,' " coach Jai Green said. "We don't have much - but we better give what we have. " On Thursday, the team is launching a drive to collect 100,000 bottles of water - 4,200 cases - to donate to residents of Flint. The drive will run through Feb. 29, Green said, and involve participation from players, coaches, parents, and sponsors.
NEWS
January 31, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, Staff Writer
Authorities now believe that a majority of the 4,200 gallons of diesel fuel that leaked from a generator spilled into the Schuylkill River, but are still confident that there is no threat to drinking water, fish or wildlife. Also, while the Schuylkill River Trail remains closed during the day, it has opened to the public in the evening, after cleanup crews have left for the day. On Friday, workers from Miller Environmental Group, the company contracted to do the cleanup, were still recovering oil from the river.
NEWS
January 26, 2016
By Dennis Miranda Most Philadelphia-area residents probably give little thought to the historic waterway to their north that feeds into Fairmount Park and the Schuylkill, or to its connection to the clean drinking water coming out of their faucets. But the city has just entered a partnership to restore this very important waterway, the Wissahickon Creek, and Montgomery County's other municipalities in the watershed should follow suit. The Wissahickon Valley is home to almost a quarter of a million people.
FOOD
January 22, 2016
Patti cakes Patti LaBelle's latest hit? Her sweet potato pie, which became a viral sensation after a fan uploaded a video of himself enjoying the dessert and singing his satisfaction. Now, the local superstar is back with a second, and third, helping: vanilla Bundt cake with vanilla icing, and a three-layer caramel cake with buttercream filling and caramel glaze. Both are manufactured for mass appeal but manage to hit the high notes. - Samantha Melamed Patti LaBelle Premium Caramel Cake, $13.94 at Walmart.
NEWS
January 16, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
Anna Okropiribce, 16, drinks from the water fountains at Northeast High School only when she's "desperate. " The water is warm and metallic-tasting. "It's pretty gross," she said. "Once, I filled up my water bottle, and the water wasn't clear. It was gray. I got scared. I was like, I don't know if I should drink this. " That's cause for concern, given that poor water intake is a likely factor in a startling phenomenon outlined in research published Thursday by a Children's Hospital of Philadelphia doctor.
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