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Drinking Water

NEWS
November 27, 2011
Do you support continuing the moratorium on drilling in the Delaware River region that provides this area's drinking water?
NEWS
November 6, 2011 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
If you despair of the direction of today's youth, the general torpor and indifference of so many, head to Central High. Visiting this school, one of the region's academic treasures, a United Nations of young talent, always makes me feel better about teenagers, Philadelphia, and, well, almost everything. There should be a dozen Centrals, and the day that occurs, we can claim success. Central is home to many remarkable students, including sophomore Afaq Mahmoud, whom her friends call Fofo, pronounced "Fufu.
NEWS
September 18, 2011
Don't distort fracking debate Banning fracking would reverse the 70 percent reduction in natural-gas prices consumers have experienced since 2008. This would have a stark impact on Pennsylvania families, especially low-income families, who spend almost a quarter of their after-tax income on energy. An attack on affordable energy is an attack on low-income families' ability to heat their homes, run hot water, and cook food. Thankfully, we don't have to choose between the environment and the poor, because drilling is being done responsibly, ensuring clean water and fresh air. But in "Drilling push raises stakes on health, environment," (Sept.
NEWS
September 10, 2011
Maybe if Pennsylvania natural-gas drillers hadn't tallied hundreds of serious environmental violations during the still-nascent Marcellus Shale boom, the ranks of protesters who swarmed an industry conference in Philadelphia this week would have been a little thinner. But it's those violations, incurred when extracting natural gas by pumping a witch's brew of chemicals underground, that have given so many people understandable pause over the process known as hydraulic fracturing, or fracking.
NEWS
September 2, 2011 | By Jeremy Roebuck, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Final estimates on exactly how many millions of gallons of raw sewage spilled into the Schuylkill from a water main break in Reading could be determined as soon as next week. But the risk period for those whose downriver public water systems that draw directly from the waterway has passed, state environmental regulators said Friday. "I was out doing fecal counts on the river today," said Krissy Pennypacker, laboratory supervisor for the Pottstown water system. "They've dropped off tremendously in the last couple of days.
NEWS
September 2, 2011 | By David Klepper and Michael Hill, Associated Press
WARWICK, R.I. - Cold showers. Meals in the dark. Refrigerators full of spoiled food. No TV. No Internet. Up and down the East Coast, patience is wearing thin among the millions of people still waiting for the electricity to come back on after Hurricane Irene knocked out the power last weekend. "It's like Little House on the Prairie times," said Debbie McWeeney, who went to a Red Cross shelter in Warwick to pick up food and water after everything in her refrigerator went bad. "Except I'm not enjoying it at all. " With the waters receding across much of the flood-stricken region, homeowners are mucking out their basements and dragging soggy furniture to the curb.
NEWS
August 30, 2011 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Health officials in Montgomery County are warning owners of private wells to drink boiled or bottled water until they can be certain wells are free of bacteria that may have washed in from floodwaters. The county sent out an alert Monday from its Norristown office aimed at those among the 35,000 owners whose wells are in low-lying areas or next to flooded waterways. "Due to the recent heavy rains from Hurricane Irene, wells inundated by floodwater may be contaminated and should not be used until tested," the alert read.
NEWS
August 25, 2011 | Staff Report
With Hurricane Irene headed to the East Coast, here are some tips to keep in mind to prepare for any possible problems. If at the Shore Determine safe evacuation routes inland. Learn locations of official shelters. Check emergency equipment, such as flashlights, generators and battery-powered equipment such as cell phones and your radios. Buy food that will keep and store drinking water. Buy plywood or other materials to protect your home if you don't already have it. Trim trees and shrubbery so branches don't fly into your home.
NEWS
August 11, 2011 | By Angela K. Brown, Associated Press
FORT WORTH, Texas - In parched West Texas, it's often easier to drill for oil than to find new sources of water. So after years of diminishing water supplies made even worse by the second-most severe drought in state history, some communities are resorting to a plan that might have seemed absurd a generation ago: turning sewage into drinking water. Construction recently began on a $13 million water-reclamation plant believed to be the first in Texas. Officials have worked to dispel any fears that people will be drinking their neighbors' urine, promising that the system will yield clean, safe water.
NEWS
August 10, 2011 | Associated Press
OCEAN CITY, N.J. - The weather put a damper on Gov. Christie's plans for a day at the beach on Tuesday. Christie postponed a beach and boardwalk visit to Ocean City as rain swept across the state in the afternoon. He had planned to tout his administration's commitment to protecting the state's beaches and waterways. Last week, Christie approved $650 million in no- and low-cost loans for water quality and protection projects. About $450 million is for projects that clean water used for fishing and swimming.
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