CollectionsDrought Conditions
IN THE NEWS

Drought Conditions

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 28, 1999 | By Sudarsan Raghavan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hours after torrential rains slammed the Philadelphia area, causing scattered street flooding and power outages, people across the region woke up yesterday to deal with downed trees and other headaches. In East Norriton Township, workers cleaned up a chlorine spill caused by flooding in a pool-supply store. And in Cherry Hill, 300 residents returned to their apartment complex, which had been evacuated when the Thursday night storm damaged underground power lines and set fire to a transformer, knocking out the electricity.
NEWS
December 11, 1998 | DAVID SWANSON / Inquirer Suburban Staff
Tom Powell of Chester checks to see how the fish are biting near the Commodore Barry Bridge. The tide on the Delaware River was lower than usual yesterday because of drought conditions.
NEWS
August 10, 2012 | By Jim Suhr, Associated Press
ST. LOUIS - The latest updates on drought conditions and food production from across the nation and around the globe are raising concern in world capitals. The Plains states where the production of corn and soybeans is key are being hit harder by excessive drought conditions in the wake of the hottest month on record in the continental United States. The weekly U.S. Drought Monitor map released Thursday showed that the amount of the nation mired in drought conditions dropped a little more than 1 percentage point, to 78.14 percent as of Tuesday.
NEWS
May 26, 2003 | By Dan Hardy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For residents of Southeastern Pennsylvania and South Jersey who have grown accustomed to droughtlike conditions in recent years, the rainfall that they have seen over the last month or so might seem to have been coming down at tropical rain-forest levels. And with showers predicted for at least three days this week in some parts of the Philadelphia region, the rain shows no sign of letting up in the near future. Still, soaked lawns and wet umbrellas to the contrary, it has actually been a relatively dry month, by historical standards.
NEWS
October 14, 1993
TEED-OFF AT THAI DEVELOPERS A golf boom has been sweeping (Thailand) for several years, with 140 courses now in operation, 160 more in the planning stage, and an eventual total of 1,000 predicted. . . . In a country already ravaged by pollution, where unrestricted logging has reduced forest cover from 53 percent of the land to 18 percent, golf courses are contributing to further the environmental damage. Drought conditions in recent years have exacerbated a serious water shortage in Thailand, and each golf course consumes enough water for a village of 1,200 people.
NEWS
October 25, 2002 | By Kaitlin Gurney INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
After the soaking rains of the last month, New Jersey's Department of Environmental Protection eased its restrictions on outdoor water use yesterday. Garden State residents may now water their lawns every other day - odd-numbered addresses on odd dates and even-numbered addresses on even dates - and washing cars is allowed on weekends. Both uses of household water had been banned since Aug. 20. But drought conditions remain. Camden County, which averages 44.7 inches of rain a year, has a 6.4-inch deficit for the last 12 months.
NEWS
August 5, 1999 | by Sally Siebert, For the Daily News
Tom Jarvis is running out of patience with Mother Nature. He's rolled with the punches. But he's losing the battle. Drought conditions are threatening the future of the last farm in Cherry Hill Township. "We're in serious trouble," said Jarvis, 58, who runs the Springdale Farm near Route 70. "We need rain to survive. " Rainfall levels are off by as much as 7 inches in the region. Excessive heat and dry weather have crippled farm production, pushing him to cut employees and work 18-hour days to keep crops alive on the 68-acre farm.
NEWS
August 15, 1991 | By Nancy Petersen, Special to The Inquirer
The Delaware River Basin Commission said yesterday that the region was sliding rapidly toward drought conditions similar to those two years ago. Unless there is significant rainfall before the end of the month, the commission will probably declare a drought warning for Delaware, eastern Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York City and the Catskills region, said the commission's chief engineer, David B. Everett. The situation is similar to that of the 1988-89 drought years, with below- average rainfall and stream flows, he said.
NEWS
August 9, 1999 | By Marc Schogol, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The prayers seemed to be working already. Even as worshipers were arriving for yesterday's 11 a.m. Mass at the Cathedral Basilica of SS. Peter and Paul in Center City, the heavens had opened up. Peering out from under an umbrella she had not needed for quite some time, one woman glanced at the falling rain, smiled and said: "Somebody up there likes us. " Apparently so. Because of the hardship caused by the drought, Cardinal Anthony...
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 10, 2012 | By Jim Suhr, Associated Press
ST. LOUIS - The latest updates on drought conditions and food production from across the nation and around the globe are raising concern in world capitals. The Plains states where the production of corn and soybeans is key are being hit harder by excessive drought conditions in the wake of the hottest month on record in the continental United States. The weekly U.S. Drought Monitor map released Thursday showed that the amount of the nation mired in drought conditions dropped a little more than 1 percentage point, to 78.14 percent as of Tuesday.
NEWS
June 1, 2012 | By Brian K. Sullivan, Bloomberg News
Tropical Depression Beryl's soaking rains were swallowed up by parched soil in Florida and Georgia and won't be enough to relieve drought conditions, state climatologists said. Beryl, 40 miles west of Cape Hatteras, N.C., with winds of 40 m.p.h., degenerated into a post-tropical cyclone as of 5 p.m. local time Wednesday, the National Hurricane Center said. Beryl was moving northeast up the North Carolina coast and will be back in the Atlantic by Thursday. While the system dropped as much as 15 inches of rain on parts of Florida after going ashore near Jacksonville on Monday, it won't slake the state's parched soil, forecasters said.
NEWS
June 5, 2011 | By Tom Lasseter, McClatchy Newspapers
XINZHOU, China - As deputy Communist Party secretary of the Yangtze River management station in Xinzhou, Ba Qiansheng is supposed to keep a close eye on rising waters. A sign across the street from his office lists flood-warning levels, and large red characters say that swimming is prohibited. But these days, the idea of a flood seems ludicrous. On one side of the giant sluice gate at Xinzhou, the water is shallow; on the other side, there's almost no water at all. The channel that is supposed to connect with the Yangtze is filled with foot-deep cracks baking in the sun where the river used to be. "It's the lowest it's been in 70 years," Ba said.
NEWS
September 23, 2010 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
The sunlight is becoming ever more oblique, the nights are about as long as the days, and, officially, the seasons have changed. Apparently, however, the atmosphere hasn't noticed. The extraordinary warmth that characterized the hottest summer on record in Philadelphia and the related intensifying dryness have lapped into the brand-new season. On Wednesday, when the last gasp of summer expired at 11:09 p.m., the temperature hit 90 for the 54th time this year, beating the record of 53 set in 1991.
NEWS
May 26, 2003 | By Dan Hardy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For residents of Southeastern Pennsylvania and South Jersey who have grown accustomed to droughtlike conditions in recent years, the rainfall that they have seen over the last month or so might seem to have been coming down at tropical rain-forest levels. And with showers predicted for at least three days this week in some parts of the Philadelphia region, the rain shows no sign of letting up in the near future. Still, soaked lawns and wet umbrellas to the contrary, it has actually been a relatively dry month, by historical standards.
NEWS
October 25, 2002 | By Kaitlin Gurney INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
After the soaking rains of the last month, New Jersey's Department of Environmental Protection eased its restrictions on outdoor water use yesterday. Garden State residents may now water their lawns every other day - odd-numbered addresses on odd dates and even-numbered addresses on even dates - and washing cars is allowed on weekends. Both uses of household water had been banned since Aug. 20. But drought conditions remain. Camden County, which averages 44.7 inches of rain a year, has a 6.4-inch deficit for the last 12 months.
NEWS
December 11, 2001 | By Don Rooney
I love this weather we've been having. And I hate it. Yeah, yeah, we had a spritz of rain over the weekend, and it's a little chillier this week. But we're still in an unusually warm, dry autumn - so much so that we're in drought conditions. Last week, I wore shorts and a T-shirt while I strung Christmas lights in record-breaking 70-degree sunshine. Harry, my next-door neighbor, set up his outdoor Christmas tree without the aid of the gloves and earmuffs he needed last year.
NEWS
March 14, 2000 | By Seth Borenstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The drought that surprised much of the country last year will be back with a vengeance this year, especially in the nation's Sun, Corn and Wheat Belts, federal officials warned yesterday. In a first-of-its-kind spring drought outlook, grim-looking officials from several federal agencies forecast a dry spring and early summer in the Midwest and particularly in the already-parched Southern third of the nation. The Northeast and West should get a pass this time. Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama each suffered their driest February in 106 years, officials reported.
NEWS
September 15, 1999 | By Suzette Parmley, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
In a strong sign that the drought is loosening its grip on the region, mandatory water restrictions were lifted in South Jersey yesterday, meaning that residents may water lawns, wash vehicles, and take longer showers. Gov. Whitman issued an executive order to lift the drought emergency in eight counties: Atlantic, Burlington, Camden, Cape May, Cumberland, Gloucester, Ocean and Salem. The counties, however, are still under a drought warning, which means the state is urging voluntary water conservation.
NEWS
August 28, 1999 | By Sudarsan Raghavan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hours after torrential rains slammed the Philadelphia area, causing scattered street flooding and power outages, people across the region woke up yesterday to deal with downed trees and other headaches. In East Norriton Township, workers cleaned up a chlorine spill caused by flooding in a pool-supply store. And in Cherry Hill, 300 residents returned to their apartment complex, which had been evacuated when the Thursday night storm damaged underground power lines and set fire to a transformer, knocking out the electricity.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|