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Drug Abuse

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NEWS
July 22, 2013 | By Susan FitzGerald, For The Inquirer
Jaimee Drakewood hurried in from the rain, eager to get to her final appointment at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Ever since her birth 23 years ago, a team of researchers has been tracking every aspect of her development - gauging her progress as an infant, measuring her IQ as a preschooler, even peering into her adolescent brain using an MRI machine. Now, after nearly a quarter century, the federally funded study was ending, and the question the researchers had been asking was answered.
NEWS
April 18, 1990 | By Patricia Quigley, Special to The Inquirer
Glassboro residents may learn a bit about drug abuse when they pay their water and tax bills. Through a plan instituted by Joseph Manganaro, superintendent of the Water and Sewer Department, borough employees are distributing drug education guides when residents come in to pay their bills. The guides contain information about eight drugs, including alcohol, cocaine and marijuana, and list physical symptoms of users, what to look for and the dangers associated with the drug's use on a 3-by-5-inch slide-rule- like card.
NEWS
September 16, 1989 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gilberto carefully unwrapped a packet containing a grayish powder and slowly sprinkled the drug into some tobacco he had arranged in a piece of cigarette paper. With practiced fingers, Gilberto rolled the cigarette and licked it shut. He lighted the cigarette, inhaled deeply. As the drug took effect, a faint smile came across his face. "It feels good," said Gilberto, 32, his voice becoming thick and smooth. "I feel a little more energetic than before. " It was 3 in the afternoon Thursday, and Gilberto had just awoken on the frayed, filthy mattress in the bedroom of his near-barren brick house in a northern Medellin neighborhood.
NEWS
April 7, 1988 | By Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
A group of Philadelphia-area lawmakers called yesterday for a wide range of programs to combat drug abuse, but they presented no specific legislative proposals. Sen. Hardy Williams (D., Phila.), backed by 10 other city legislators, cited the slayings last month of Anthony Williams, 13, and his brother Cornell, 15, as examples of the worsening drug problem. The two youths, who lived near the King Plaza public-housing project in the 1200 block of Catharine Street, were abducted March 12 and later shot, allegedly by cocaine dealers for whom they sold drugs.
SPORTS
May 26, 2004 | Daily News Wire Services
Diego Maradona is in a rigorous rehab program for drug abuse and is considering further treatment outside Argentina, his doctor said yesterday. The 43-year-old soccer great, who led Argentina to the 1986 World Cup title, has been at a psychiatric hospital in suburban Buenos Aires since early May when he was rushed to a clinic for lung and heart problems. Dr. Alfredo Cahe, Maradona's personal physician, said the former player appeared to be taking drug rehab seriously "for the first time in his life.
NEWS
November 7, 1986 | By Dr. William S. Greenfield
There have been significant recent developments in the areas of detecting and treating drug abuse in the workplace. Unfortunately, broadbrush drug screening bypasses these developments. It offers the allure of technology and action, and the illusion of security. In fact it is a throwback to moralistic models of substance abuse that have traditionally fueled rather than quelled abuse problems. This is particularly unfortunate today because of the strides that have been made in addiction treatment in the last decade.
NEWS
November 8, 1990 | By Wendy Greenberg, Special to The Inquirer
The attorneys of the Montgomery County Bar Association and the doctors of the Montgomery County Medical Society are joining the fight against illegal drugs in the schools with a new program to speak to students on the consequences of drug abuse. The first participants in the program will be Cheltenham Elementary School students, who will meet today with Cheltenham physician Donna Farrell and attorney Leonard L. Shober of McTighe, Weiss, Bacine & O'Rourke of Norristown. Students in Cheltenham's Myers Elementary School will participate in a December program.
NEWS
March 22, 2001 | By Susan Weidener INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
These days, many schools have a zero-tolerance policy for students caught doing drugs or drinking alcohol on campus. But Westtown School has a different approach. For the last eight years, the private Quaker day and boarding school, founded in 1799, has had a two-track system of discipline and treatment that educators and students at the school agree is working. "Since we left that [zero-tolerance policy] and went to the dual track, we have seen a lessening of drug abuse," said head of school Tom Farquhar.
SPORTS
January 23, 1989 | By Bill Ordine, Inquirer Staff Writer The Associated Press and Boston Globe contributed to this article
Cincinnati Bengals backup fullback Stanley Wilson, who has a history of drug problems, was suspended before yesterday's Super Bowl for violating the NFL's substance-abuse policy. Details were sketchy, but sources with the Bengals gave this account of the incident that led to the league's suspension: Wilson, 27, had appeared in good spirits earlier Saturday, posing for pictures with some young Bengals fans after a morning team meeting. He missed a 7 p.m. team meeting, however, and was then found in his hotel room incoherent and apparently under the influence of a controlled substance.
NEWS
September 24, 1986 | By Joseph A. Califano Jr., From The New York Times
The Congressional leadership and the Reagan Administration discovered this summer what the Harlem Representative Charles B. Rangel and every urban cop and street-smart teen-ager from Brooklyn to East Los Angeles have known for more than a decade: addiction is America's No. 1 crime problem. The arrival of crack and its electric spread beyond the black ghettos have frightened middle-class parents. The President and the Congress are responding like vigilantes in the Wild West. But what they have done so far is likely to be as effective in dealing with addiction as the gun-toting vigilantes were in pacifying our frontier.
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NEWS
June 9, 2016
By Michelle Kichline Chester County is one of the wealthiest, one of the best educated, and yes, even one of the healthiest counties in the nation. But we are not immune to the heroin and opiate epidemic. We face the same crisis that is creating significant issues - and causing deaths - across Pennsylvania and America. Recently, Philadelphia City Councilman David Oh asked me to testify at one of his community meetings on the crisis - to confirm that prescription medications and heroin are as much a problem in places like Chester County as they are in Center City.
NEWS
May 28, 2016 | Staff Report
We have been hearing a lot lately about opioid addiction but what is the difference between opioids and opiates? It basically comes down to synthetic vs natural. Opiates are narcotics derived directly from the poppy flower, such a opium, heroin and morphine. Opioids are chemical compounds - natural or synthetic - that act on opioid receptors, which are distributed widely in the brain, and are found in the spinal cord and digestive tract. In other words, opiates are opioids, but not all opioids are opiates.
NEWS
May 8, 2016
Q. I've read so much about people overdosing on prescription pain medicines (opioids) that I'm afraid to take them even as directed by my doctor. Are they bad drugs? A. Opioids such as morphine, oxycodone and fentanyl are excellent drugs for treatment of many types of severe pain. They can be prescribed for short- or long-term use, or somewhere in between. When used properly - following a prescriber's directions and subsequent proper monitoring by a healthcare professional - this class of therapeutics can greatly benefit a patient.
NEWS
March 12, 2016 | By Michael Boren, Staff Writer
Kyle Crosby said he never planned to kill his wife, Erica Crippen, on New Year's Eve in 2014, and acted out of fear afterward. "I was scared," said Crosby, who disposed of Crippen's body in Maryland farmland in the weeks after choking her in their Mount Laurel home. Crosby was sentenced to 31 years in prison for the crime Thursday in Superior Court in Burlington County, where he apologized to Crippen's family. "I miss Erica, my wife, terribly," Crosby said, adding to her family, "Hopefully one day you will find it in your hearts to forgive me. " Crosby pleaded guilty in December to aggravated manslaughter and hindering apprehension.
NEWS
March 5, 2016 | By Melanie Burney, Staff Writer
Four years ago, Landon Hacker needed a lawyer after his drug abuse and repeated brushes with the law landed him in prison. Hacker was headed in a bad direction, a cocaine and heroin junkie and homeless. A New Jersey judge predicted that Hacker would probably spend most of his life in prison. He managed to turn his life around, thanks to a state drug court program that gives offenders a second chance. He also moved a step closer this week to becoming a lawyer. Hacker, 28, of Burlington City, gave the keynote address Thursday in Mount Holly at two drug court commencement ceremonies, the same program he graduated from in 2014.
NEWS
February 20, 2016
By John J. Taylor Pennsylvania leads the nation in drug-overdose deaths among young adult men. According to the Trust for America's Health, the state suffered 30.3 deaths per 100,000 young adult male residents. When all ages and genders are combined, Pennsylvania ranks ninth in the nation. It is clear that we are in the midst of an ever-increasing epidemic in which the grief from these tragedies does not end when the family leaves the grave site. It can and often does consume surviving family members with an unrelenting emptiness and lifelong sadness.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2016
DEAR ABBY: My stepson just turned 7. My husband was granted custody because the mother was declared unfit due to her drug abuse. She was granted supervised visits until she can pass two consecutive drug tests. Over the last year and a half, her visits have become few and far between. My husband and I think it would be a good idea for "Tony" to start seeing a therapist again. He doesn't talk about his mother often, and I'm worried he may be bottling up a lot of his feelings. Tony is starting to ask more questions about his mom - like why he can't stay the night with her, why he can't live with her, and why he hasn't seen her much lately.
NEWS
January 16, 2016 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Staff Writer
A Philadelphia judge has ruled that documents and other evidence from pretrial proceedings in a lawsuit involving sexual abuse of minors by a Catholic priest will remain public before trial. The two-paragraph ruling by Common Pleas Court Judge Mark I. Bernstein was a setback for the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, which had asked for an order barring public disclosure of the materials. The church has insisted on confidentiality as a condition for engaging in pretrial discovery with lawyers in suits seeking damages for being sexually molested by priests.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2015 | Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Weiland's drug abuse Scott Weiland 's ex-wife, in an open letter in Rolling Stone, bemoans the late musician's chronic substance abuse. The cause of the rocker's death has yet to be determined, but cocaine was discovered in the tour bus where he died last week at age 48. "Dec. 3, 2015, is not the day [he] died," writes Mary Forsberg Weiland , who has two kids with Weiland: Noah , 15, and Lucy , 13. "The truth is, like so many other kids, they lost their father years ago. " Kimye baby update In a shocking report, TMZ says Kim Kardashian did not have the birth of baby boy Saint filmed for use in her reality show.
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