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Drug Abuse

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NEWS
July 22, 2013 | By Susan FitzGerald, For The Inquirer
Jaimee Drakewood hurried in from the rain, eager to get to her final appointment at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Ever since her birth 23 years ago, a team of researchers has been tracking every aspect of her development - gauging her progress as an infant, measuring her IQ as a preschooler, even peering into her adolescent brain using an MRI machine. Now, after nearly a quarter century, the federally funded study was ending, and the question the researchers had been asking was answered.
NEWS
April 18, 1990 | By Patricia Quigley, Special to The Inquirer
Glassboro residents may learn a bit about drug abuse when they pay their water and tax bills. Through a plan instituted by Joseph Manganaro, superintendent of the Water and Sewer Department, borough employees are distributing drug education guides when residents come in to pay their bills. The guides contain information about eight drugs, including alcohol, cocaine and marijuana, and list physical symptoms of users, what to look for and the dangers associated with the drug's use on a 3-by-5-inch slide-rule- like card.
NEWS
September 16, 1989 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gilberto carefully unwrapped a packet containing a grayish powder and slowly sprinkled the drug into some tobacco he had arranged in a piece of cigarette paper. With practiced fingers, Gilberto rolled the cigarette and licked it shut. He lighted the cigarette, inhaled deeply. As the drug took effect, a faint smile came across his face. "It feels good," said Gilberto, 32, his voice becoming thick and smooth. "I feel a little more energetic than before. " It was 3 in the afternoon Thursday, and Gilberto had just awoken on the frayed, filthy mattress in the bedroom of his near-barren brick house in a northern Medellin neighborhood.
NEWS
April 7, 1988 | By Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
A group of Philadelphia-area lawmakers called yesterday for a wide range of programs to combat drug abuse, but they presented no specific legislative proposals. Sen. Hardy Williams (D., Phila.), backed by 10 other city legislators, cited the slayings last month of Anthony Williams, 13, and his brother Cornell, 15, as examples of the worsening drug problem. The two youths, who lived near the King Plaza public-housing project in the 1200 block of Catharine Street, were abducted March 12 and later shot, allegedly by cocaine dealers for whom they sold drugs.
SPORTS
May 26, 2004 | Daily News Wire Services
Diego Maradona is in a rigorous rehab program for drug abuse and is considering further treatment outside Argentina, his doctor said yesterday. The 43-year-old soccer great, who led Argentina to the 1986 World Cup title, has been at a psychiatric hospital in suburban Buenos Aires since early May when he was rushed to a clinic for lung and heart problems. Dr. Alfredo Cahe, Maradona's personal physician, said the former player appeared to be taking drug rehab seriously "for the first time in his life.
NEWS
November 7, 1986 | By Dr. William S. Greenfield
There have been significant recent developments in the areas of detecting and treating drug abuse in the workplace. Unfortunately, broadbrush drug screening bypasses these developments. It offers the allure of technology and action, and the illusion of security. In fact it is a throwback to moralistic models of substance abuse that have traditionally fueled rather than quelled abuse problems. This is particularly unfortunate today because of the strides that have been made in addiction treatment in the last decade.
NEWS
November 8, 1990 | By Wendy Greenberg, Special to The Inquirer
The attorneys of the Montgomery County Bar Association and the doctors of the Montgomery County Medical Society are joining the fight against illegal drugs in the schools with a new program to speak to students on the consequences of drug abuse. The first participants in the program will be Cheltenham Elementary School students, who will meet today with Cheltenham physician Donna Farrell and attorney Leonard L. Shober of McTighe, Weiss, Bacine & O'Rourke of Norristown. Students in Cheltenham's Myers Elementary School will participate in a December program.
NEWS
March 22, 2001 | By Susan Weidener INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
These days, many schools have a zero-tolerance policy for students caught doing drugs or drinking alcohol on campus. But Westtown School has a different approach. For the last eight years, the private Quaker day and boarding school, founded in 1799, has had a two-track system of discipline and treatment that educators and students at the school agree is working. "Since we left that [zero-tolerance policy] and went to the dual track, we have seen a lessening of drug abuse," said head of school Tom Farquhar.
SPORTS
January 23, 1989 | By Bill Ordine, Inquirer Staff Writer The Associated Press and Boston Globe contributed to this article
Cincinnati Bengals backup fullback Stanley Wilson, who has a history of drug problems, was suspended before yesterday's Super Bowl for violating the NFL's substance-abuse policy. Details were sketchy, but sources with the Bengals gave this account of the incident that led to the league's suspension: Wilson, 27, had appeared in good spirits earlier Saturday, posing for pictures with some young Bengals fans after a morning team meeting. He missed a 7 p.m. team meeting, however, and was then found in his hotel room incoherent and apparently under the influence of a controlled substance.
NEWS
August 27, 1987 | By Katherine Scobey, Special to The Inquirer
The Upper Merion school board this week introduced a new drug-abuse policy designed to spot students with developing alcohol and drug problems and direct them to help. The public will have a month to make comments and suggestions. The policy was formally presented Monday evening at the school board meeting. A week earlier, board members voiced no substantive objections to the policy at their work session; they are scheduled to vote on the policy at their next public meeting, scheduled for Sept.
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NEWS
July 3, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
A North Philadelphia woman who admitted helping her boyfriend identify and kill a 29-year-old bodega clerk he believed was a witness against him in another murder was sentenced to five to 10 years in prison Wednesday by a Philadelphia judge. The prison term for Eliana Vazquez, 22, was below the six to 20 years recommended under state sentencing guidelines. Common Pleas Court Judge Benjamin Lerner said Vazquez's early decision to testify against her boyfriend and two others deserved "a strong amount of credit for a just resolution of this case.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2015
CHARLIE WILSON first came to prominence in the late 1970s as the frontman for the Gap Band, formed by Wilson and his brothers, Robert and Lonnie, in 1967 in their hometown of Tulsa, Okla. The siblings came by their musicality as the sons of a Pentecostal minister who insisted that his children learn to play various instruments. The band originally bore the name Greenwood, Archer and Pine Street Band, which was subsequently shortened to the G.A.P. Street Band. A printing error on an advertisement for a gig identified the unit as "The Gap Band," and the brothers claimed the name.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2015 | BY TOM DI NARDO, For the Daily News
SIXTY years after his death, Charlie Parker's status as a jazz alto saxophonist supreme remains one of American music's most enigmatic legacies. Plagued by drug abuse, racism, the compulsive need for female guidance and the burden of musical genius, the man known as "Yardbird" - or simply "Bird" - lived a brief life filled with passion, tragedy and unforgettable characters: the core ingredients of opera. "Yardbird," Opera Philadelphia's first world premiere since its first season 40 years ago, is told in flashbacks after Parker's death at only 34, in 1955.
NEWS
May 12, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
The War on Terror hasn't lasted that long - not compared with the Hundred Years' War (1337- 1453) or even the Thirty Years' War (1618-48). But most Americans are war-weary nonetheless, and there is no sign of relief. How can there be when any violent act by a lone wolf can be claimed by a terrorist organization as its latest attack on America? U.S. officials were trying to determine whether ISIS, which claimed responsibility for a shootout last week at a free-speech event in Texas, was actually involved.
NEWS
March 8, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
He ate two cookies - light vanilla coating with cream filling - drank a Dr Pepper, and counted to himself as the Rev. Andrew McCormick unfastened the 33 buttons on his cassock one by one. A 27-year-old man recounted that vivid memory from the witness stand this week, describing the moments before McCormick allegedly sexually assaulted him about 18 years ago. And as jurors began deliberating the suspended priest's fate Friday, their decision could...
NEWS
January 3, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Everybody knows it's really hard for smokers to quit. Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania think a quick brain scan could someday make quitting easier - or at least more effective. In a recent study, they found that certain changes in the brain, visible using technology that measures brain activity, predicted better than anything else now available which smokers would quickly relapse - that's most of them - and which might be able to quit without much more than a pep talk.
NEWS
December 24, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
A New Jersey woman's use of methadone during pregnancy to treat a prescription drug addiction did not violate abuse and negligence laws, though her baby suffered from methadone withdrawal upon birth, the state Supreme Court ruled Monday. In a 6-0 decision, the court reversed an Appellate Division ruling that the mother was negligent and abusive because her methadone use caused her child's suffering, which included tremors, fever, and trouble sleeping. The high court said the previous ruling did not consider whether the woman "exercised a 'minimum degree of care' or 'unreasonably' inflicted harm on her newborn.
NEWS
December 18, 2014 | By Laura McCrystal, Chris Palmer, and Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writers
Next week, Nicole Stone's family was to gather in Lansdale for an annual Christmas Eve feast of peeled shrimp and clam linguine. Seated around the table would have been four generations - Stone, her two young daughters, her mother, grandmother, and sister. Now only the little girls are alive. Over a few hours Monday, Stone's ex-husband, Bradley W. Stone, killed the rest. "It's unbelievable," Nicole Stone's aunt Connie McGaughey said Tuesday. "It's a nightmare. " But it's not that some kind of trouble was unexpected.
NEWS
December 4, 2014 | BY WENDY RUDERMAN & BARBARA LAKER, Daily News Staff Writers rudermw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5924
PEOPLE battling drug and alcohol addiction in Philadelphia are watching Hollywood movies in outpatient group therapy - on your dime.   The tab can exceed $50 a person for each movie, paid by Medicaid. Clients said that some of the movies they saw - like "Caddyshack" and "Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles" - had nothing to do with recovery. The films that did depict addiction, including "The Basketball Diaries," starring Leonardo DiCaprio as a heroin addict, and "28 Days," with Sandra Bullock in the throes of alcoholism, made them crave the very substance they are trying to kick, they said.
NEWS
October 10, 2014 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Patricia Davenport allegedly introduced her daughter to heroin in April, with the 15-year-old snorting the drug in their Harleysville kitchen. By the summer, a needle was in the girl's forearms several times a week, with Davenport often injecting her, police said. The girl's 16-year-old boyfriend was getting high with them too, and Davenport's 8-year-old son often watched, according to court records. Several times a week for six months, Davenport took the three children to North Philadelphia to score the heroin, injecting her daughter and the girl's boyfriend on the ride home, police said.
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