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Drug Abuse

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NEWS
July 22, 2013 | By Susan FitzGerald, For The Inquirer
Jaimee Drakewood hurried in from the rain, eager to get to her final appointment at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Ever since her birth 23 years ago, a team of researchers has been tracking every aspect of her development - gauging her progress as an infant, measuring her IQ as a preschooler, even peering into her adolescent brain using an MRI machine. Now, after nearly a quarter century, the federally funded study was ending, and the question the researchers had been asking was answered.
NEWS
April 18, 1990 | By Patricia Quigley, Special to The Inquirer
Glassboro residents may learn a bit about drug abuse when they pay their water and tax bills. Through a plan instituted by Joseph Manganaro, superintendent of the Water and Sewer Department, borough employees are distributing drug education guides when residents come in to pay their bills. The guides contain information about eight drugs, including alcohol, cocaine and marijuana, and list physical symptoms of users, what to look for and the dangers associated with the drug's use on a 3-by-5-inch slide-rule- like card.
NEWS
September 16, 1989 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gilberto carefully unwrapped a packet containing a grayish powder and slowly sprinkled the drug into some tobacco he had arranged in a piece of cigarette paper. With practiced fingers, Gilberto rolled the cigarette and licked it shut. He lighted the cigarette, inhaled deeply. As the drug took effect, a faint smile came across his face. "It feels good," said Gilberto, 32, his voice becoming thick and smooth. "I feel a little more energetic than before. " It was 3 in the afternoon Thursday, and Gilberto had just awoken on the frayed, filthy mattress in the bedroom of his near-barren brick house in a northern Medellin neighborhood.
NEWS
April 7, 1988 | By Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
A group of Philadelphia-area lawmakers called yesterday for a wide range of programs to combat drug abuse, but they presented no specific legislative proposals. Sen. Hardy Williams (D., Phila.), backed by 10 other city legislators, cited the slayings last month of Anthony Williams, 13, and his brother Cornell, 15, as examples of the worsening drug problem. The two youths, who lived near the King Plaza public-housing project in the 1200 block of Catharine Street, were abducted March 12 and later shot, allegedly by cocaine dealers for whom they sold drugs.
SPORTS
May 26, 2004 | Daily News Wire Services
Diego Maradona is in a rigorous rehab program for drug abuse and is considering further treatment outside Argentina, his doctor said yesterday. The 43-year-old soccer great, who led Argentina to the 1986 World Cup title, has been at a psychiatric hospital in suburban Buenos Aires since early May when he was rushed to a clinic for lung and heart problems. Dr. Alfredo Cahe, Maradona's personal physician, said the former player appeared to be taking drug rehab seriously "for the first time in his life.
NEWS
November 7, 1986 | By Dr. William S. Greenfield
There have been significant recent developments in the areas of detecting and treating drug abuse in the workplace. Unfortunately, broadbrush drug screening bypasses these developments. It offers the allure of technology and action, and the illusion of security. In fact it is a throwback to moralistic models of substance abuse that have traditionally fueled rather than quelled abuse problems. This is particularly unfortunate today because of the strides that have been made in addiction treatment in the last decade.
NEWS
November 8, 1990 | By Wendy Greenberg, Special to The Inquirer
The attorneys of the Montgomery County Bar Association and the doctors of the Montgomery County Medical Society are joining the fight against illegal drugs in the schools with a new program to speak to students on the consequences of drug abuse. The first participants in the program will be Cheltenham Elementary School students, who will meet today with Cheltenham physician Donna Farrell and attorney Leonard L. Shober of McTighe, Weiss, Bacine & O'Rourke of Norristown. Students in Cheltenham's Myers Elementary School will participate in a December program.
NEWS
March 22, 2001 | By Susan Weidener INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
These days, many schools have a zero-tolerance policy for students caught doing drugs or drinking alcohol on campus. But Westtown School has a different approach. For the last eight years, the private Quaker day and boarding school, founded in 1799, has had a two-track system of discipline and treatment that educators and students at the school agree is working. "Since we left that [zero-tolerance policy] and went to the dual track, we have seen a lessening of drug abuse," said head of school Tom Farquhar.
SPORTS
January 23, 1989 | By Bill Ordine, Inquirer Staff Writer The Associated Press and Boston Globe contributed to this article
Cincinnati Bengals backup fullback Stanley Wilson, who has a history of drug problems, was suspended before yesterday's Super Bowl for violating the NFL's substance-abuse policy. Details were sketchy, but sources with the Bengals gave this account of the incident that led to the league's suspension: Wilson, 27, had appeared in good spirits earlier Saturday, posing for pictures with some young Bengals fans after a morning team meeting. He missed a 7 p.m. team meeting, however, and was then found in his hotel room incoherent and apparently under the influence of a controlled substance.
NEWS
September 24, 1986 | By Joseph A. Califano Jr., From The New York Times
The Congressional leadership and the Reagan Administration discovered this summer what the Harlem Representative Charles B. Rangel and every urban cop and street-smart teen-ager from Brooklyn to East Los Angeles have known for more than a decade: addiction is America's No. 1 crime problem. The arrival of crack and its electric spread beyond the black ghettos have frightened middle-class parents. The President and the Congress are responding like vigilantes in the Wild West. But what they have done so far is likely to be as effective in dealing with addiction as the gun-toting vigilantes were in pacifying our frontier.
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NEWS
December 4, 2014 | BY WENDY RUDERMAN & BARBARA LAKER, Daily News Staff Writers rudermw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5924
PEOPLE battling drug and alcohol addiction in Philadelphia are watching Hollywood movies in outpatient group therapy - on your dime.   The tab can exceed $50 a person for each movie, paid by Medicaid. Clients said that some of the movies they saw - like "Caddyshack" and "Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles" - had nothing to do with recovery. The films that did depict addiction, including "The Basketball Diaries," starring Leonardo DiCaprio as a heroin addict, and "28 Days," with Sandra Bullock in the throes of alcoholism, made them crave the very substance they are trying to kick, they said.
NEWS
October 10, 2014 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Patricia Davenport allegedly introduced her daughter to heroin in April, with the 15-year-old snorting the drug in their Harleysville kitchen. By the summer, a needle was in the girl's forearms several times a week, with Davenport often injecting her, police said. The girl's 16-year-old boyfriend was getting high with them too, and Davenport's 8-year-old son often watched, according to court records. Several times a week for six months, Davenport took the three children to North Philadelphia to score the heroin, injecting her daughter and the girl's boyfriend on the ride home, police said.
NEWS
August 6, 2014 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
AS PERVASIVE a problem as sex trafficking is in the Philadelphia region, experts in the field say that gaps in services for victims and local funding make handling the tough cases even more challenging. Assistant U.S. Attorney Michelle Morgan, who prosecutes sex-trafficking cases in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia, said she and her colleagues are constantly faced with the daunting question of how to help victims during their abusers' trials and postconviction - and too often, there is simply no place to send them for the help they need.
NEWS
June 21, 2014
ISSUE | OVERDOSES Heroin proving more deadly than guns Inquirer coverage missed something very significant about heroin overdoses, which took more lives in Philadelphia in 2012 than guns: So many family members and friends of those who have overdosed on heroin feel robbed because they never even realized their loved one was having an issue until it was too late ("Heroin uptick: Is it a crisis?" June 18). This is one reason the media attention surrounding this issue has been invaluable: Parents are learning to recognize signs of drug abuse, people are noticing and talking about the issue, and those who love someone struggling with addiction can look around and see they are not alone.
BUSINESS
June 13, 2014 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
College is supposed to be a place to open one's mind to new ideas, but too often it has become a place to begin abusing prescription drugs - assuming that wasn't first tried in high school. "Colleges get a new crop of eager high school graduates each year," U.S. Attorney Zane David Memeger said in his opening remarks to a gathering Wednesday at Temple University. "Unfortunately, one of the lessons these students failed to learn in high school is the risks with prescription drugs, and that can play itself out on campuses throughout the country.
NEWS
April 24, 2014
The American public has so conditioned itself to think of drug abuse as an inner-city problem seen mostly among poor black and brown people that it is jarring when reality paints a very different picture. That happened Monday when authorities announced that they had broken up a drug ring catering to privileged teens in Philadelphia's tony suburbs. Nine adults and two 17-year-olds allegedly sold drugs to students at Lower Merion, Harriton, Conestoga, and Radnor High Schools. The arrests made national news, which shows how rare major drug busts are in such settings.
NEWS
March 6, 2014
The recent capture of fugitive drug lord Joaquín "El Chapo" Guzmán was rightly hailed for the level of cooperation it showed between the United States and Mexico. But it's doubtful that it will bring about any noticeable difference in the illegal drug trade. It's not just that others have been waiting in the wings for an opportunity to take over portions or all of the Guzmán organization's turf. It's that the fall of one kingpin isn't likely to topple the market so long as the demand from its biggest customer, the United States, continues to be huge.
NEWS
March 5, 2014 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Saying Burlington County needs to better serve the hundreds of homeless people within its borders, a faith-based group wants to create a 300-bed residence and training center for them in Lumberton - and some residents who live near the site have begun to organize in opposition. To be called Community of Hope, the facility would be on a former Nike missile base at Municipal Drive and Eayrestown Road. In recent years, the five-acre site was home to the Midway School, which has closed. "We started studying the question of what Burlington County needs five . . . years ago," Kent Pipes, president of the Affordable Homes Group in Westampton, said Monday.
NEWS
February 18, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
YOU WOULDN'T think that anyone who had endured what Jaci Adams had in a life of childhood abuse, drug addiction and prison would have any right to be cheerful and friendly. And yet there Jaci was, in many a social gathering, "the brightest spot in the room," as Ronda B. Goldfein, executive director of the AIDS Law Project, put it. "All the laughter came from her corner of the room," Goldfein said. "She had a great outlook on life. " Jaci Adams, a transgender woman and an inspirational leader for others in Philadelphia's LGBT community, a busy volunteer in HIV and AIDS programs, died Saturday of cancer.
NEWS
February 12, 2014
If you subscribe to the theory that good can come out of bad, you might apply it to the tragic death of actor Philip Seymour Hoffman and the attention it has brought to heroin addiction in this country. The question is whether the focus will last long enough to produce meaningful results. Too often, after a celebrity has succumbed to drug abuse, the public has responded with sighs and calls for something be done, only to lapse into silence within a matter of days as eyes and thoughts are directed toward something happier - like, say, the U.S. medal count in the Olympics.
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