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Drug Abuse Resistance Education

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NEWS
March 28, 1991 | Special to The Inquirer / ROGER TUNIS
AT THE END of a drug-awareness program, fifth graders at Russell Struble School in Bensalem participate in a skit called "Take Your Dream And Make It Happen. " D.A.R.E., Drug Abuse Resistance Education, was the name of the police-sponsored program last Thursday. And exploring positive possibilities was the name of the game.
NEWS
April 21, 1991 | By Stephen C. Row, Special to The Inquirer
Bristol Borough schools may soon have local police officers in classrooms teaching fifth and sixth graders to say no to drugs. The program, proposed by Thomas Shaffer, elementary principal, was presented to school board members Thursday night by William Pezza, a board member. "You have our support," Board President Louis Persichetti told Pezza. Persichetti said the only possible obstacle would be cost. No figures were discussed Thursday. Drug Abuse Resistance Education is a program started several years ago in Los Angeles.
NEWS
September 13, 1993 | By Claire Furia, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Four local police officers hope to convince fifth graders in the Interboro School District that drug use will bring them major problems, not friends. Officers from Prospect Park, Tinicum, Norwood and Glenolden are ready to take on the role of teacher at those towns' elementary schools next month as part of the Drug Abuse Resistance Education (DARE) program. The DARE lessons will focus on providing accurate information about alcohol and drugs, teaching decision making, showing students how to resist peer pressure, and offering alternatives to drug use. The program has been in the works in Interboro for about a year, and training was funded by a federal grant, said Tinicum Police Chief Robert T. Lythgoe Jr. Officers John Saddic, James Simpkins, Paul Stolz and Francis Hogan have completed a two-week training course and are scheduled to visit the fifth graders once a week for 17 weeks, said Interboro School District Superintendent Edmond O. Sacchetti.
NEWS
October 2, 1987 | By Robert J. Terry and Dale Mezzacappa, Inquirer Staff Writers
Ten specially trained police officers will spend a semester in 28 public and 12 Catholic schools teaching fifth and sixth graders about the threat of drug abuse, School Superintendent Constance E. Clayton and Police Commissioner Kevin M. Tucker announced yesterday. The program, called Drug Abuse Resistance Education (DARE), was begun in Los Angeles and has proven successful in helping students avoid drug abuse, Tucker said. The 45-minute classes will be offered once a week, providing not only information about drugs and alcohol, but teaching the students decision-making skills and showing them how to resist peer pressure.
NEWS
June 14, 1995 | By Justin Pritchard, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In a summertime downpour, a SEPTA bus shelter may seem more a safe haven than an invitation to harm oneself. But not according to Jay Quinn, Democratic candidate for township commissioner. Quinn says he wants bus shelters in the township to stop luring young people to use cigarettes or alcohol. Allowing advertising for such products is a tacit endorsement of them, he says - and a hypocritical one, given the township's family orientation. If the township had no stake in the billboards, it might be easy to ban them.
NEWS
July 1, 1990 | By Michelle Rizzo, Special to The Inquirer
The Bristol Township School Board voted unanimously Thursday to begin the Drug Abuse Resistance Education (DARE) program in September. Originally begun in 1983 in Los Angeles, DARE sends uniformed police officers into fifth- and sixth-grade classrooms to expose the hazards of drug and alcohol abuse. Bristol Township and Bensalem schools will be the first districts in Bucks County to sponsor the program, which has been launched in more than 300 school districts across the country.
NEWS
December 26, 1993 | By Edward Engel, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In a way, when the township gained a police officer early this month, it lost a police officer. The same officer. But now the man in question, Glenn Cunningham, will be back giving 450 Winslow sixth graders lessons in drug prevention. Those students had been without an instructor for the popular Drug Abuse Resistance Education program since Nov. 15, when the county Sheriff's Department laid off Cunningham and two other DARE officers. The layoffs came after a $6,500 shortfall in department funds, for which Sheriff Bill Simon blamed county freeholders and the freeholders faulted Simon.
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NEWS
March 28, 2013 | By Kathleen Tinney, Inquirer Staff Writer
The laughter that regularly filtered into the halls of Bell Oaks Middle School in Bellmawr had an unlikely source: a class of sixth graders and a cop. The subject, drug and alcohol abuse, wasn't funny. But Sgt. Robert E. Swanson Jr. was. He wrapped his precautionary message for preteens in wisecracks and compassion, and they ate it up. For 20 of his 29 years on the Bellmawr force, Sgt. Swanson was the instructor at Bell Oaks for Drug Abuse Resistance Education (DARE), the preventive curriculum taught nationwide by local law enforcement officers.
NEWS
January 8, 2013 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The New Jersey chapter of the country's largest drug-abuse prevention program for schoolchildren is in jeopardy of losing its charter in a dispute over a national curriculum it says is unproved. The state chapter of Drug Abuse Resistance Education, popularly known as D.A.R.E., introduced an alternate curriculum in New Jersey elementary schools in July, allegedly without seeking approval of its parent organization, D.A.R.E. America. The move came after the New Jersey Association of School Administrators notified New Jersey D.A.R.E.
NEWS
October 31, 2002 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At a time when DARE has been branded as ineffective, some Bucks County schools soon will begin to offer a drug-prevention program taught by health educators rather than police officers. Project Alert, which began in Los Angeles in 1990, is taught by school health instructors or visiting drug counselors. It will begin in January in the Bensalem and Council Rock School Districts and in the Pennridge district in the spring. In Bucks, Project Alert is now taught only in the Bristol Township district.
NEWS
October 10, 2001
So long to DARE, none too soon A dark shadow has been obliterated by the light of truth in our community. Not with a bang or even a whimper, the Drug Abuse Resistance Education program was ended at Ocean City Intermediate School. The many research papers showing DARE's ineffectiveness and negative impact on students finally pushed the school board and administration to do the right thing. How we ever allowed our children to be exposed to such a dishonest, fear-based program speaks volumes about our society.
NEWS
May 23, 2001 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
George W. Farrell, 49, a West Deptford police officer who brought the national DARE program to New Jersey in 1987, died of a heart attack Saturday at Underwood-Memorial Hospital, Woodbury. He had lived in West Deptford for more than 18 years and was born in Camden. Mr. Farrell, a detective sergeant, joined the West Deptford Police Department in 1979. Over the years, he received a number of commendations from school groups and domestic-violence organizations for his efforts, Police Chief James Mehaffey said.
NEWS
March 10, 2001 | by Nicole Weisensee Egan Daily News Staff Writer
For years, Kennett Square Police Chief Albert McCarthy had taught Corey Medina and his classmates to stay away from guns. But he never dreamed he'd be the one to put Medina to the test. Earlier this week, that's exactly what happened when McCarthy inadvertently left his Glock semi-automatic on the window sill of the Chester County school's bathroom. Medina found it a few minutes later, then told his teacher. Now, the 12-year-old sixth-grader is a hero at his school because he did exactly what he was taught to do. And McCarthy is on a four-day unpaid suspension - imposed by himself.
NEWS
March 9, 2001 | By Jonathan Gelb INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Local officials yesterday commended Police Chief Albert McCarthy for asking to be suspended after he accidentally left his unloaded gun in a bathroom at Mary D. Lang Elementary School. "He is not going to live by a double standard," Mayor Leon Spencer said. "His nature is to do things by the letter of the law. He sees this as an embarrassment to the department. " Authorities also praised the sixth grader who immediately alerted a teacher upon finding the weapon Wednesday. The gun was recovered safely, and McCarthy apologized to the students.
NEWS
March 2, 2001 | By Maureen Fitzgerald INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
For 10 years, Collingswood police officers have stood in the town's fifth-grade classrooms, lecturing about the dangers of drugs and alcohol. And for 10 years, they have followed the same DARE (Drug Abuse Resistance Education) workbook used by 36 million children nationwide, giving 17 lessons on topics such as how to resist peer pressure and different ways to say no. But as the DARE graduates ascended through high school, the local police were still hauling in teenagers for drinking on weekends.
NEWS
February 23, 2001
New money and research may improve it. Science may finally replace good intentions as the driving force behind drug and alcohol education in the nation's schools. It's about time. After years of suppressing criticism and resisting change, the omnipresent Drug Abuse Resistance Education program - known better simply as DARE - is rewriting its curriculum. The changes promise a better chance for more kids to avoid the devastating grip of drug abuse. Last year, research shows, one in four of America's 23.6 million teens had used illegal drugs in the previous 30 days.
NEWS
August 14, 2000 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Denny W. Kerper, 45, a Voorhees police sergeant who led the community's Drug Abuse Resistance Education program, died of leukemia Thursday at Hahnemann University Hospital, Philadelphia. He had lived in Mount Ephraim for most of his life and was born in Camden. A 1985 graduate of the Camden City Police Academy, Mr. Kerper joined the Voorhees Township Police Department that year and became a sergeant in 1997. He was assigned to the DARE unit in 1992 and Crime Prevention Unit 28 in 1995.
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