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Drug Abuse

NEWS
August 25, 2013 | By Theodore Schleifer, Inquirer Staff Writer
At an open-casket funeral in the Campbell Funeral Chapel in Trenton this month, more than 50 friends and relatives gathered to say goodbye to Sharolyn Jackson. She had lived a troubled life, but the service and nearby burial celebrated the people-loving, 50-year-old mother of five. Except the woman in the casket wasn't her. She had the same forehead, figure, and hands, and they could have been sisters. But they weren't even related. To this day, no one knows who was lowered into the ground Aug. 3 at Colonial Memorial Park in Hamilton, N.J. The mistake was uncovered almost two weeks later, when Jackson was spotted at a shopping mall by a person associated with the social-service agency that saw to her needs, her family said.
NEWS
July 22, 2013 | By Susan FitzGerald, For The Inquirer
Jaimee Drakewood hurried in from the rain, eager to get to her final appointment at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Ever since her birth 23 years ago, a team of researchers has been tracking every aspect of her development - gauging her progress as an infant, measuring her IQ as a preschooler, even peering into her adolescent brain using an MRI machine. Now, after nearly a quarter century, the federally funded study was ending, and the question the researchers had been asking was answered.
NEWS
July 12, 2013 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
An epidemic of drug addictions sweeping New Jersey in "leaps and bounds" has taken an unprecedented hold in the suburbs that is far more serious than the heroin crisis of the 1960s and '70s, according to Lee Seglem, assistant director of the state's Commission of Investigation. A blistering 74-page report issued by the commission Wednesday said a network of corrupt doctors - some feeding Russian organized crime by bilking Medicaid and Medicare - has created a proliferation of painkillers and heroin, with open-air drug markets in cities and at malls in affluent communities.
NEWS
June 16, 2013
Just in case you needed another reason to be nice to Dad today: New research out of the University of Pennsylvania's medical and veterinary schools found stressful experiences can be transferred to sperm, increasing the odds that offspring will have blunted responses to stress. That, in turn, is known to be linked to anxiety and depression. OK, it's a mouse study. But the findings, according to the research last month in the Journal of Neuroscience , are the first to show an epigenetic link - a genetic change caused by outside influences - to stress-related diseases passed from father to child.
SPORTS
March 8, 2013 | Daily News Wire Reports
THE AKRON ZIPS will be without the services of starting point guard Alex Abreu after the All-Mid-American Conference junior found himself in jail on Thursday facing multiple felony charges, according to published reports. The Akron Beacon-Journal reported that Abreu was arrested after accepting a "large" shipment of marijuana from undercover officers who detected the package using drug dogs. Akron Municipal Court records showed Abreu was charged with two third-degree felonies of drug trafficking and drug abuse.
NEWS
February 1, 2013 | By Barbara Boyer and Darran Simon, Inquirer Staff Writers
The deadly confrontation in Berlin Borough where one man shot another with a bow and arrow was the culmination of a peculiar feud, a Superior Court judge in Camden heard Wednesday. It was a tangled tale: A spurned lover trying to reclaim the affections of a woman; a threat by that man to infect someone with HIV; allegations of stalking; a history of drug abuse - and the fatal intervention of another man. The drama came to a head Monday night outside a tidy split-level in the shadow of a concrete plant.
NEWS
January 17, 2013 | By Joelle Farrell, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Drug overdose is the leading cause of accidental death in New Jersey. It surpassed traffic fatalities in 2009, when 752 people died, according to a drug policy advocacy group. Of those deaths, 75 percent involved heroin or prescription opiates, a growing addiction problem in New Jersey and the nation. Legislators tried to address the issue last year when they approved the Good Samaritan Emergency Response Act, a bill that offered limited criminal amnesty to drug users who call for help when someone has overdosed.
NEWS
January 17, 2013
By Nancy Robinson Vice President Biden and President Obama have a real opportunity to reduce gun violence, and it doesn't require banning assault weapons. Although the debate following the Newtown shootings immediately turned to assault rifles, those weapons have little to do with the vast majority of gun deaths in America. Every year, the city of Bridgeport, Conn., less than 30 miles from Newtown, buries as many people due to violence as were killed at Sandy Hook Elementary School that day. In 2010, 1,773 young people were victims of homicide in the United States; 67 of them were elementary-school age. Year after year, gun violence - not diabetes, auto accidents, or drug abuse - is the No. 1 cause of death for young African American men and boys.
NEWS
January 8, 2013 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The New Jersey chapter of the country's largest drug-abuse prevention program for schoolchildren is in jeopardy of losing its charter in a dispute over a national curriculum it says is unproved. The state chapter of Drug Abuse Resistance Education, popularly known as D.A.R.E., introduced an alternate curriculum in New Jersey elementary schools in July, allegedly without seeking approval of its parent organization, D.A.R.E. America. The move came after the New Jersey Association of School Administrators notified New Jersey D.A.R.E.
NEWS
January 3, 2013
What a top prosecutor calls "the fastest-growing drug problem" in America isn't about dope dealers on a street corner. It starts inside doctors' offices, clinics, hospital emergency rooms, and at pharmacy counters - where painkillers are acquired by prescription. The rampant abuse of addictive drugs such as oxycodone and hydrocodone contributes to an overdose epidemic now viewed by federal health officials as the leading U.S. cause of accidental death, and Pennsylvania is high on the list of problem states.
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