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Drug Abuse

NEWS
January 3, 2013
What a top prosecutor calls "the fastest-growing drug problem" in America isn't about dope dealers on a street corner. It starts inside doctors' offices, clinics, hospital emergency rooms, and at pharmacy counters - where painkillers are acquired by prescription. The rampant abuse of addictive drugs such as oxycodone and hydrocodone contributes to an overdose epidemic now viewed by federal health officials as the leading U.S. cause of accidental death, and Pennsylvania is high on the list of problem states.
NEWS
December 16, 2012
Peter Mandel is an author of books for children, including the new "Jackhammer Sam" (Macmillan/Roaring Brook) The Internet is a nearly infinite universe of things I do not want to know. I can usually ignore the boasts, the shards of opinion, and the superfluous stuff. But one fact sticks in my craw: There are people who brazenly use my name. I'm not alone in this. The journalist David F. Carr shares most of his name with the well-known New York Times columnist David M. Carr. It didn't seem so bad, F. Carr recently said, except that M. Carr chronicled his years of drug abuse in his memoir.
NEWS
November 22, 2012 | By Marilynn Marchione, Associated Press
Older teens and adults with attention deficit disorder are much less likely to commit a crime while on ADHD medication, a provocative study from Sweden found. It also showed in dramatic fashion how much more prone people with ADHD are to break the law - four to seven times more likely than others. The findings suggest that Ritalin, Adderall, and other drugs that curb hyperactivity and boost attention remain important beyond the school-age years and that wider use of these medications in older patients might help curb crime.
NEWS
October 19, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
An accidental overdose of heroin caused the Aug. 5 death of Garrett Reid, son of Eagles head coach Andy Reid, Northampton County Coroner Zachary Lysek announced at an afternoon news conference. The cause of death will be listed as "acute opiate (heroin) toxicity" and classified as "accidental," Lysek said. The finding confirms what many, including the coach himself, suspected, because of Garrett Reid's history of drug abuse. The body of Garrett Reid, 29, was found in a Lehigh University dormitory room during Eagles training camp.
NEWS
October 12, 2012 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Patty DiRenzo describes how she felt Friday when she heard that Gov. Christie had vetoed New Jersey's "911 Good Samaritan" legislation. "It was like I'd been punched in the stomach," the Blackwood legal secretary says. The measure, for which DiRenzo, 53, had lobbied for two years, would spare those who summon emergency aid for drug-overdose victims from potentially facing drug charges themselves. The proposal needs more scrutiny, according to Christie, a former federal prosecutor who has shown similar caution about establishing the state's medical-marijuana program.
NEWS
October 4, 2012 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Salvatore Marchese completed treatment for heroin addiction, but his success was shortlived: An overdose left him dead in a car in Camden. The 2010 death of the 26-year-old Blackwood resident was part of a growing epidemic of heroin use and abuse of prescription pain killers in the suburbs, according to experts who met Tuesday. Members of a task force created by the governor held the last of several public hearings to study the problem and potential reforms. The concerns they heard included denials from insurance companies to pay for drug rehabilitation, and too few facilities to treat drug addiction.
NEWS
October 3, 2012 | By Linda A. Johnson, Associated Press
TRENTON - Former Johnson & Johnson CEO James E. Burke, who steered the health-care giant through the Tylenol poisonings in the 1980s that resulted in the first tamper-resistant product packaging, has died. The company said Burke died late Friday at the age of 87, after a long, unspecified illness. Burke, who ran the New Brunswick, N.J., company for 13 of his 37 years there, also had a big impact in his second career, as chairman of the Partnership for a Drug-Free America for 16 years.
NEWS
September 30, 2012 | By Carolyn Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
The New Jersey Department of Children and Families this week rejected a request from a child-advocacy group for records on the state's handling of the case of Zahree Thomas, 2, whose mother killed him last month. Chevonne Thomas, 34, committed suicide shortly after decapitating her son. She called 911 at 12:11 a.m. Aug. 22 to report his death and, after initially blaming her boyfriend, admitted to a dispatcher that she had stabbed Zahree. The department had been monitoring the Camden woman, who had a history of mental illness and drug abuse.
NEWS
September 27, 2012 | By Mari A. Schaefer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Time to clean out the cabinets of expired, unused and unwanted prescription drugs. The nation's Drug Enforcement Agency is sponsoring a "Drug Take-Back Day" on Saturday Sept. 29th. This is the fifth time authorities have sponsored such an event to combat a growing prescription drug abuse, DEA officials said. In April, 276 tons of medication was turned into the 5,659 take-back sites that were available in all 50 states and U.S. territories. More than 774 tons of medication has been collected from all the events, DEA officials said.
NEWS
September 10, 2012 | By James Osborne, Inquirer Staff Writer
The question can be heard up and down the Camden block where Osvaldo Rivera allegedly stabbed a 6-year-old boy to death and slashed the boy's 12-year-old sister last Sunday: Was the man known as "Popeye," who played ball with neighborhood children and gave them haircuts on his porch not who he seemed or was the dreadful attack fueled by the drug concoction called "wet" that he allegedly told authorities he had smoked that night? In the Roosevelt Manor public housing complex where Rivera allegedly committed the crimes, where residents say drug abuse is commonplace, mothers last week clutched their children even tighter and kept an eye on the doors where they said known users live.
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