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Drug Abuse

NEWS
March 19, 2012 | Wires
By Daniel Akst You are about to read four words I never thought I would write: Pat Robertson is right. The good reverend isn't right about everything, of course. After the 9/11 attacks, when Jerry Falwell laid much of the blame on feminists, gays, and the American Civil Liberties Union, Robertson readily concurred. On other occasions, Robertson - a Yale Law School graduate! - has also suggested that feminism promotes witchcraft and child murder, and that America should assassinate Venezuelan leader Hugo Chávez.
NEWS
March 1, 2012 | By Darran Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey Attorney General Jeffrey S. Chiesa on Wednesday announced a statewide ban on all forms of synthetic marijuana, the so-called designer drug that mimics the effects of marijuana. The concoction, also known as K2 and Spice, is the third most commonly abused drug by high school seniors, behind marijuana and prescription drugs, according to a 2011 study funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse. Side effects include violent seizures, dangerously elevated heart rates, and hallucinations, according to the institute and the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration.
NEWS
February 23, 2012 | By Matt Katz, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
PALISADES PARK, N.J. - A month before his controversial order to honor the late Whitney Houston by flying flags at half-staff, Gov. Christie rejected a bill that would have required the deaths of active New Jersey service members to be reported to local and county leaders to ensure a similar show of respect. Despite unanimous support from Republicans and Democrats in the Legislature, the Republican governor let the measure die by not signing it. That's known as a pocket veto. The bill is of renewed interest because of outrage that followed Christie's order to fly flags in the state at half-staff last Friday, the day before the New Jersey pop star's funeral.
NEWS
February 16, 2012 | By Matt Katz, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Should flags fly at half-staff to mark the death of Whitney Houston? That question has become the center of the latest Internet-inspired storm cloud to hover over Gov. Christie. Christie announced Tuesday at a news conference that U.S. and New Jersey flags would be lowered for one day - Saturday, the day of Houston's funeral - to honor a New Jerseyan who was "an important part of the cultural fabric of this state. " As word spread via social media, response was fast and often furious.
NEWS
February 14, 2012
The story is familiar. Beautiful, talented singer, actor, dancer, and on down the list, succumbs in a tragic likely accident that may have involved drug abuse. Whitney Houston was added to that roll call Saturday. She was 48. Like so many others, she is gone too soon, and yet she will always be with us. Almost from the time the little girl from Newark opened her mouth in song, it was clear she would one day be a star. And why not, given her lineage? Gospel great Cissy Houston was her mother, pop music icon Dionne Warwick her aunt, and the queen of soul, Aretha Franklin, her godmother.
NEWS
February 12, 2012 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
On the front lines of the real war on drugs in New Jersey, people are heartened by five words in Gov. Christie's State of the State address. "The disease of drug abuse" was the phrase the governor used in proposing mandatory addiction treatment in cases of nonviolent drug-related offenses. "The governor gets it," says Stephanie Loebs, vice president of treatment services at Seabrook House Inc., a rehabilitation center in Cumberland County that has helped addicts and alcoholics recover for nearly 40 years.
NEWS
February 9, 2012
Jamie Moyer may no longer be a Phillie, but he has left a part of himself with this city that will have a positive impact on its youth long after he steps away from baseball. Philadelphia is one of three cities the Moyer Foundation calls home. Created by Moyer and his wife, Karen, the foundation funds programs that help children handle stress, including the Camp Erin program for children mourning the death of a parent or close relative, and the Camp Mariposa program for children with substance abuse in the family.
NEWS
January 17, 2012 | By Beth DeFalco, Associated Press
TRENTON - More than five years after New Jersey passed a law to start tracking prescription drug use, the state will launch a database to monitor use of dangerous drugs with the intent of helping doctors spot abusers more quickly and authorities stop drug dealers. The database, which has been collecting information since Sept. 1, contains more than four million prescriptions. Starting this month, doctors and pharmacies, including mail-order operations, can access detailed patient information on prescriptions for painkillers, steroids, sedatives, and stimulants.
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