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Drug Discovery

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BUSINESS
November 13, 2013 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Simon Cowell was not involved in GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C.'s inaugural "Discovery Fast Track" competition pitting academic drug hunters against one another in a contest that was something of a talent show. There were no silly or sappy or snarky celebrities, at least of the TV-show kind. But there were Albert Einstein bobblehead dolls. Glaxo is searching for better ways to discover and develop drugs so its pipeline produces more effective and profitable medicine. The London company ran this contest, and will search for drug candidates through its facility in Upper Providence, Montgomery County.
BUSINESS
April 21, 2004 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
AstraZeneca P.L.C. chief executive officer Tom McKillop recalled yesterday that as a young chemist, he was proud of having "asbestos fingers. " Working in a drug discovery lab, he and other chemists handled hot flasks and their fingers were always dusty. But those days are gone, McKillop told a crowd of employees and visitors at AstraZeneca's U.S. headquarters near Wilmington. The London-based drugmaker yesterday opened a fifth new building in Delaware - a robotic, fully automated chemical compound management and storage facility that the company said would speed discovery of innovative medicines.
BUSINESS
November 5, 1998 | By Andrea Ahles, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sifting through a database of 250,000 organic compounds, Ziwei Huang identified potential drugs to fight multiple sclerosis and graft-vs.-host disease in transplant patients in only one week. Huang, the director of Thomas Jefferson University's Peptide Chemistry Laboratory, used computer modeling and drug design to speed up the drug discovery process. "It takes a couple of months in the computer rather than several years in the laboratory," said Huang. A drug chosen from Huang's potential compounds is now in clinical trials in bone-marrow transplant patients at Jefferson after only three years in the laboratory, compared with the usual five years of basic preclinical research that is performed on drug compounds, said Huang.
BUSINESS
June 1, 2015 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Before Mike Sofia became a big name in the world of drug discovery, he and his team wrestled with a challenge common to many businesses: How do we take a great idea to a bigger scale? How would they take a molecule from working well in one cell to a whole patient, and have it kill the hepatitis C virus without damaging the body? And then, how would they produce enough of it to make medicine for millions? "There appeared to be no path forward, and the project could have been stopped in its tracks," Sofia said.
BUSINESS
October 17, 2002 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. said yesterday that it would close two local pharmaceutical research facilities as part of an effort to streamline its drug discovery process. The laboratories at DuPont's Experimental Station outside Wilmington and across the Delaware River in Deepwater, N.J., employ 655 and were part of Bristol-Myers' $7.8 billion purchase of DuPont Pharmaceuticals a year ago. Bristol-Myers, of New York, said it was consolidating its drug discovery operations in central New Jersey and Wallingford, Conn.
BUSINESS
November 7, 2003 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C., the world's second-largest drug company, said yesterday that it would establish a research center in Upper Merion and in England that would concentrate on developing biotechnology medicines. London-based Glaxo, which has a U.S. headquarters and 6,000 employees in the Philadelphia area, created six research centers, each focusing on a therapeutic area, in 2001 after the merger of SmithKline Beecham and Glaxo Wellcome. The company calls these units "Centers of Excellence for Drug Discovery.
BUSINESS
November 26, 2001 | By Benjamin Y. Lowe INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the race to find, develop and market new medicines, Locus Discovery Inc. says it has a Porsche while everyone else is stuck driving minivans. Using one of the world's most powerful computer clusters, the Blue Bell biotechnology company said it can compress years of medical research into weeks or months. "This is nothing short of a paradigm shift in drug discovery," said Nicholas Landekic, Locus' president and chief executive officer. "This makes obsolete many previous approaches to drug discovery.
BUSINESS
November 12, 2004 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After the $70 billion merger in 2000 that created GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C., chief executive officer Jean-Pierre Garnier faced a problem: how to replenish the product pipeline to replace aging blockbuster drugs such as the antidepressant Paxil and antibiotic Augmentin. Garnier and his team reorganized the research labs and invested $292 million in screening machines, robots and other technology so that scientists could identify more disease targets, such as cell receptors, and generate new chemical compounds faster.
BUSINESS
February 11, 2004 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A new cell-phone-size device to measure clotting in the blood and a gene-blocking technology to treat the causes of adult blindness are among the initiatives of eight local companies that will receive the second round of investments from BioAdvance, the Philadelphia region's life-sciences "greenhouse. " The start-ups each will receive between $100,000 and $500,000, for a total of $3.3 million, BioAdvance said yesterday. The money comes from Pennsylvania's share of the settlement with the nation's tobacco companies.
BUSINESS
July 2, 2007 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Second of two parts Paul A. Friedman was faced with a dilemma when DuPont Pharmaceuticals was sold six years ago: Join the big acquiring company, Bristol-Myers Squibb Co., or leave for a small biotech. Friedman, who was head of research and drug development at DuPont Pharmaceuticals, and his team wanted to work together. They hooked up with a California genomics company, Incyte Corp., and moved the headquarters to Wilmington. Incyte's focus is now drug discovery, no longer genomics.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
June 1, 2015 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Before Mike Sofia became a big name in the world of drug discovery, he and his team wrestled with a challenge common to many businesses: How do we take a great idea to a bigger scale? How would they take a molecule from working well in one cell to a whole patient, and have it kill the hepatitis C virus without damaging the body? And then, how would they produce enough of it to make medicine for millions? "There appeared to be no path forward, and the project could have been stopped in its tracks," Sofia said.
BUSINESS
November 13, 2013 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Simon Cowell was not involved in GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C.'s inaugural "Discovery Fast Track" competition pitting academic drug hunters against one another in a contest that was something of a talent show. There were no silly or sappy or snarky celebrities, at least of the TV-show kind. But there were Albert Einstein bobblehead dolls. Glaxo is searching for better ways to discover and develop drugs so its pipeline produces more effective and profitable medicine. The London company ran this contest, and will search for drug candidates through its facility in Upper Providence, Montgomery County.
NEWS
July 19, 2007 | By Erika Gebel INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a discovery that could have sweeping implications for pharmaceuticals of the future, scientists are reporting today that the long-observed jiggle of proteins is not just nervous energy but a carefully orchestrated dance that brings them together. Virtually all medicines work by interacting with proteins - tiny organic molecules that trigger all bodily functions, from the blinking of an eye to inflammation that causes pain. For years, researchers have routinely relied on three-dimensional images of proteins to design custom-fitted pharmaceuticals.
BUSINESS
July 2, 2007 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Second of two parts Paul A. Friedman was faced with a dilemma when DuPont Pharmaceuticals was sold six years ago: Join the big acquiring company, Bristol-Myers Squibb Co., or leave for a small biotech. Friedman, who was head of research and drug development at DuPont Pharmaceuticals, and his team wanted to work together. They hooked up with a California genomics company, Incyte Corp., and moved the headquarters to Wilmington. Incyte's focus is now drug discovery, no longer genomics.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2005 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Their abs are ripped, and so are their jeans. They're bronzed, they're bathing-suited - they're Paul Walker, Jessica Alba, and the rest of the gang in the drug-running, treasure-hunting Caribbean caper Into the Blue. It's The Deep reimagined as an Abercrombie catalog. Directed by John Stockwell, who showed his affection for lithe bods and big waves in the surfer pic Blue Crush, Into the Blue begins with a plane crashing into that blue - its cargo, millions of dollars' worth of illegal white stuff, buried in the coastal waters of the Bahamas.
BUSINESS
November 12, 2004 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After the $70 billion merger in 2000 that created GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C., chief executive officer Jean-Pierre Garnier faced a problem: how to replenish the product pipeline to replace aging blockbuster drugs such as the antidepressant Paxil and antibiotic Augmentin. Garnier and his team reorganized the research labs and invested $292 million in screening machines, robots and other technology so that scientists could identify more disease targets, such as cell receptors, and generate new chemical compounds faster.
BUSINESS
May 25, 2004 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The newest pharmaceutical company in the Philadelphia region is coming to town with a fresh game plan: Find growth by buying or licensing new medicines, not by inventing them. Based in the United Kingdom, Shire Pharmaceuticals Group P.L.C. is consolidating operations in Kentucky and Maryland and establishing U.S. headquarters in Chester County this summer as part of its yearlong effort to overhaul how it does business. Shire chief executive officer Matthew W. Emmens, who was in Philadelphia yesterday to meet with area business leaders and Gov. Rendell, said Shire planned to hire 200 new employees this year, bringing a total of 400 new jobs to the area by the end of next year.
BUSINESS
April 21, 2004 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
AstraZeneca P.L.C. chief executive officer Tom McKillop recalled yesterday that as a young chemist, he was proud of having "asbestos fingers. " Working in a drug discovery lab, he and other chemists handled hot flasks and their fingers were always dusty. But those days are gone, McKillop told a crowd of employees and visitors at AstraZeneca's U.S. headquarters near Wilmington. The London-based drugmaker yesterday opened a fifth new building in Delaware - a robotic, fully automated chemical compound management and storage facility that the company said would speed discovery of innovative medicines.
BUSINESS
February 11, 2004 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A new cell-phone-size device to measure clotting in the blood and a gene-blocking technology to treat the causes of adult blindness are among the initiatives of eight local companies that will receive the second round of investments from BioAdvance, the Philadelphia region's life-sciences "greenhouse. " The start-ups each will receive between $100,000 and $500,000, for a total of $3.3 million, BioAdvance said yesterday. The money comes from Pennsylvania's share of the settlement with the nation's tobacco companies.
BUSINESS
November 7, 2003 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C., the world's second-largest drug company, said yesterday that it would establish a research center in Upper Merion and in England that would concentrate on developing biotechnology medicines. London-based Glaxo, which has a U.S. headquarters and 6,000 employees in the Philadelphia area, created six research centers, each focusing on a therapeutic area, in 2001 after the merger of SmithKline Beecham and Glaxo Wellcome. The company calls these units "Centers of Excellence for Drug Discovery.
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