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Drug Policy

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SPORTS
August 5, 1995 | Daily News Wire Services
The University of Miami announced yesterday a stricter drug policy in the wake of reports that one of its football stars tested positive and was allowed to play anyway. The new policy, which requires all athletics to undergo a minimum of three random tests each year, also comes as the NCAA Committee on Infractions begins to review information from investigations into three scandals at Miami in the past year. "It's not intended to punish," Miami athletic director Paul Dee said.
SPORTS
August 31, 2007 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
The PGA Tour is nearing completion on a comprehensive drug policy, and commissioner Tim Finchem said yesterday that testing could start as early as next year. Finchem spoke to the tour's 16-man player advisory council on Monday and updated it on the PGA's progress. He said drug testing would be only one part of the policy. Still to be determined are exemptions for therapeutic use. The LPGA Tour will begin drug testing next year. U.S. Solheim Cup player Sherri Steinhauer shot a 5-under-par 67 in windy conditions to take a 1-stroke lead in the LPGA State Farm Classic, while Annika Sorenstam was 4 shots back on the Panther Creek Country Club course in Springfield, Ill. Marc Warren made eight birdies for an 8-under 65 to take a 1-stroke lead in the first round of the Johnnie Walker Championship on the Centenary Course in Gleneagles, Scotland.
NEWS
April 8, 2009
Almost a century ago, the United States started down the path toward prohibition of illegal drugs and criminalization of those who use them. Decades of lackluster to disastrous results did little to change the chosen course. Only a sharp economic downturn could do that. There's little to like about the current recession, but it is moving drug and prison policies in a more pragmatic direction. In one of the most remarkable examples, New York's legislature voted last week to dismantle its harsh drug laws.
SPORTS
April 29, 1990 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Buffalo defenseman Uwe Krupp tested positive for the stimulant phentermine a week ago at the World Championships in Switzerland, it pointed up the NHL's almost nonexistent drug policy. Krupp, playing for his native West Germany, was banned from all international competition for 18 months, but his status with the Sabres will not be affected since the NHL does not test for drugs. (The league has, however, taken action against three players who were charged with possession of heroin or cocaine.
NEWS
June 14, 1987 | By Lillian Micko, Special to The Inquirer
The Chesilhurst school board last week adopted a revised drug-education policy to comply with a new state law. Administrative principal Shirley B. Foster said at the board's meeting Monday night that the district had had a policy for several years and that the revisions were mostly technical. Under Chesilhurst's policy, Foster said that all 180 students in the district, which teaches kindergarten through sixth grade, already were being exposed to lectures and films on drug abuse.
NEWS
September 4, 1987 | By PAUL BAKER, Daily News Staff Writer
The Transport Workers Union already is objecting to a new drug policy that SEPTA wants approved next week when the matter goes before U.S. District Judge Edmund Ludwig. In February, Ludwig ordered SEPTA to halt random drug testing of employees until it could come up with a better program. Roger Tauss, president of TWU Local 234, yesterday labeled the new program unreasonable and "insane. " In addition to random drug testing, Tauss said, SEPTA wants a drug rehabilitation program that would insist on management being told the names of employees who ask for help in dealing with their drug programs.
NEWS
June 21, 1988 | By GLORIA CAMPISI and MARK MELTZER, Daily News Staff Writers
Philadelphia Electric has established a tough new drug policy requiring the firing of any employee caught dealing or using drugs. It also calls for random drug testing for any worker with unescorted-access clearance to its nuclear facilities, from PE's chairman on down. The utility in March fired four workers indicted earlier by a federal grand jury for allegedly participating in a ring that sold methamphetamine inside the Peach Bottom nuclear power plant in York County. Peach Bottom was shut down by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in March 1987, after control room workers were found sleeping on the job or playing video games.
SPORTS
February 12, 2003 | Daily News Wire Services
Orlando center Shawn Kemp was suspended without pay by the NBA yesterday, the third time he has violated the terms of the league's anti-drug policy. Kemp's suspension began with last night's game against New Jersey, and will continue until he has resumed full compliance with his treatment program. "We don't know whether the program was violated or he just missed a test. You just hope things work out for him," Orlando coach Doc Rivers said. "The basketball side of it with him I could honestly care less.
SPORTS
March 11, 1986 | By Angelo Cataldi, Inquirer Staff Writer
After acknowledging that drug use had become "a major problem" in the National Football League, commissioner Pete Rozelle yesterday vowed to institute a stringent policy addressing the issue before next season. During a news conference at the annual owners' meetings, Rozelle revealed that he had begun discussions with the NFL Players Association about strict new sanctions against drug use, and he quickly added that he was prepared to implement a policy unilaterally if an agreement could not be reached.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2016 | By Ellen Gray, TV CRITIC
It's no secret this country has a drug problem, and not just with the kind peddled on street corners to vacant-eyed addicts. Do we also have a pain problem? Many of our TV shows are brought to us by products with fanciful names promising relief from ailments large and small, and, perhaps most of all, from pain. And as PBS's Frontline reports Tuesday in a two-hour presentation, Chasing Heroin , it's the search for pain relief - as well as for profits - that helped lead to a national problem with heroin that's not always fully acknowledged.
SPORTS
March 13, 2015 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
JOHN DALY has taken a swing at the PGA Tour's drug-testing policy. Daly, on his radio show, "Hit It Hard With John Daly" on Sirius/XM, said the Tour notifies players before they will be tested, given them time to clean up their act. "It's not random; it's a big a joke," Daly said. "This whole drug testing is a joke. " Daly said he expects to be tested before this week's Valspar Championship at Innisbrook Resort in Palm Harbor, Fla. "I know when I'm getting drug tested," he said.
SPORTS
July 24, 2013 | Daily News Wire Reports
THE LATEST distraction for the Denver Broncos comes from All-Pro linebacker Von Miller, who insisted yesterday he did nothing wrong in the face of reports he could miss four games for violating the NFL's drug policy. "I know I did nothing wrong. I'm sure this'll be resolved fairly," Miller tweeted, acknowledging he had seen the reports and adding he was disappointed the Broncos have to open camp with this news hanging over them. ESPN first reported the pending discipline for Miller.
NEWS
April 26, 2013 | By Brian Witte, Associated Press
BALTIMORE - The nation's drug czar said Wednesday that the legalization of marijuana in Washington state and Colorado won't change his office's mission of fighting the country's drug problem by focusing on addiction treatment that will be available under the federal health overhaul. Gil Kerlikowske, director of the National Drug Control Policy, released President Obama's 2013 strategy for fighting drug addiction Wednesday at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore. The strategy includes a greater emphasis on using public-health tools to battle addiction and diverting nonviolent drug offenders into treatment instead of prisons.
SPORTS
February 26, 2013 | Daily News Wire Reports
BASEBALL UNION head Michael Weiner said Monday there have been talks about increasing the penalties for violating baseball's drug-testing program. "There are certainly some players who have expressed that," Weiner said. "We've had discussions with the commissioner's office. If it turns out that we have a different penalty structure because that's what players are interested in, that's what the owners are interested in, it will be for 2014. " Weiner spoke to the media after he met with the Toronto Blue Jays as part of his annual tour of spring training camps.
SPORTS
January 10, 2013 | Daily News staff and wire reports
THE TORONTO Maple Leafs fired general manager Brian Burke on Wednesday with the NHL on the verge of beginning its season. Burke's brash and outspoken style apparently did not mesh well with the new corporate owners of the Maple Leafs, who haven't won the Stanley Cup since 1967. Maple Leaf Sports & Entertainment president Tom Anselmi said at a news conference that longtime Burke assistant David Nonis will fill the job. Burke will stay as a senior adviser. Anselmi acknowledged that 4 years without a playoff berth factored into the decision.
SPORTS
November 29, 2012
The Phillies finally provided us with some significant offseason news on Tuesday. It was bad news, but significant nonetheless. All-star catcher Carlos Ruiz, the best position player on the team in 2012, will not be around for the start of the 2013 season after testing positive late last season for the banned amphetamine Adderall. That's a huge development for the team, the player, and the game. The ramifications of Ruiz's 25-game suspension are clear for the team and the player, even if the method for dealing with them is not. The Phillies, trying to rebound from a disappointing .500 season, will continue their traditional march to opening day without at least one of their best players.
SPORTS
August 18, 2012
It's official: Pro golfer Phil Mickelson and members of the O'Malley family now own the Padres. Major League Baseball's owners Thursday approved the sale of John Moores' club to a group that includes Kevin and Brian O'Malley, sons of former Dodgers owner Peter O'Malley; Peter and Tom Seidler (Peter's nephews); Mickelson, and beer magnate Ron Fowler for about $800 million. Commissioner Bud Selig said it's going to be difficult to say farewell to Moores, whose divorce forced him to put the team on the market in 2009.
NEWS
August 10, 2012 | Stu Bykofsky
AS TERRIBLE as the tragedy of Garrett Reid's death was, the massive amount of play it received in the media and elsewhere — a moment of silence before a Phillies game for a nonplayer who died essentially of self-inflicted wounds? — yanked me back to a question I have grappled with over the years — whether it's time to decriminalize drug use. Every time I get close to "yes," a case like Reid's pulls me back to "no. " Easing up on hard drug enforcement will bring more misery, more addiction, more death.
SPORTS
June 21, 2012 | By David Murphy, Daily News Staff Writer
IF MORAL INDIGNATION is what you are after, feel free to read the following paragraph and then flip to the adult entertainment advertisements at the back of our section (or their online equivalent, the comments section). MORAL INDIGNATION! MORAL INDIGNATION! MORAL INDIGNATION! Now, for those of you who want to have an honest discussion about drug-testing, let's take a look at what actually happened yesterday evening when the Phillies announced that rookie infielder Freddy Galvis had been suspended for a drug test that revealed traces of the banned drug Clostebol in his system.
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