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Dry Cleaning

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NEWS
August 5, 1990 | By Murray Dubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Seung "Sue" Park, 29, did not like working in the grocery store in Logan. The roof needed fixing. It was too hot in the summer, too cold in the winter. The hours were long, the work hard. There had to be some other way to make a living. "Everyone else was in dry cleaning," says Park. "Dry cleaning was easier. " So she and her husband bought a dry-cleaning shop and plant at City and Haverford Avenues. That was less than two years ago. Today they own two more shops. People named Park and Kim and Choi are buying dry cleaners everywhere.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1999 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Nicole and Jean-Marie, a happily married bourgeois couple, are dry cleaners dedicated to eradicating stains. They live a spotless life until the morning that an Adonis of a drag performer enters the store and asks whether they can remove a chianti blot from his silver lame dress. Although lame is a delicate material, they successfully clean the frock. But how do you Scotchguard the fabric of a marriage from the emotional spillage caused by this handsome bisexual who is as powerfully attracted to both of them as each is to him?
LIVING
September 29, 2000 | By Maria Gallagher, FOR THE INQUIRER
You couldn't resist buying that velvet quilt, down comforter or tapestry bedspread. Now, how can you keep it looking like new? The International Fabricare Institute, the leading trade association for dry cleaners and launderers, recommends dry-cleaning or professional laundering for bedspreads and comforters that are tailored or quilted. Save the care instructions and take them along when you drop off the item. The institute also recommends cleaning all matching or coordinating items - including accent pillows - at the same time, and by the same process, so that any color changes will be uniform.
NEWS
June 12, 1987 | By JIM NICHOLSON, Daily News Staff Writer
Services were to be held this morning for Tom Pitucci, founder and co-owner of Bambi dry cleaners, who died Tuesday. He was 61 and lived in South Philadelphia. Pitucci founded the dry-cleaning chain about 30 years ago and had plants at Broad Street and Snyder Avenue, Broad and Tasker streets, Broad and Porter streets and 15th Street and Packer Avenue. A graduate of South Philadelphia High School, Pitucci was a member of St. Monica's Roman Catholic Church and was an Army Air Corps veteran of World War II. He also belonged to the Gear Civic Association, the Sons of Italy, the St. Monica Father and Son Organization, the South Philadelphia Businessmen's Association and the Professional Dry Cleaners Association.
LIVING
May 28, 1996 | By Alice Urbanski, FOR THE INQUIRER
Got a clogged drain? Some dirty shirts? Or a roll of film that needs developing? Maybe you need to order some flowers, or get your car inspected. Your employer might be able to help. Increasingly, companies are offering unusual perks or "convenience benefits" - from finding handymen for employees to providing dry cleaning, photo, floral and auto repair services. Add to the list: shoe repair, video rentals, meals to go, car washes, package wrapping and delivery, banking, pagers for expectant fathers - even concierge services that can get you a table at a trendy restaurant.
NEWS
October 16, 1993 | By Robert Zausner, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
Hey, accidents happen. And it was certainly possible that a waitress spilled some coffee on a patron's jacket. So restaurant owner Cathy Young - and perhaps thousands throughout the country - sent a check for $9.20 to what she thought was a soiled customer. "I was dumb," the owner of Young's Restaurant in Meshoppen, Wyoming County, Pa., said yesterday after discovering it was all a big scam. She wasn't the only one. Authorities believe a letter claiming a waiter error and containing a copy of a $9.20 dry-cleaning bill went to thousands of restaurateurs.
NEWS
February 11, 1998 | by Peggy Landers, Daily News Staff Writer
Dry cleaning has got to be among life's least-liked expenses. It costs so, so much, compared to what you seem to be getting back. A pressed jacket for $4.95? OK, it's super=pressed. But the lapels are creased wrong, and now you have to drive back to the cleaners and wait while they do it right. A working couple locked into the dress-for-success routine can easily spend more than $100 a month cleaning clothes. And let's not even get into how much those $79 wool slacks bought on sale will end up costing after a year's worth of trips to the cleaner's.
NEWS
April 11, 2000 | By Michelle Jeffery, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Five cars in a Conrail freight train derailed yesterday morning in a muddy ditch between Germantown Pike and Township Line Road. No injuries were reported. One of the cars was carrying tetrachlorethylene, a cleaning agent used in dry cleaning, which is hazardous, according to CSX Corp. spokesman Robert Sullivan. The other tanker car was hauling home heating oil. "There were no leaks," Sullivan said. "The cars worked as they were designed to and everything stayed intact," Sullivan said.
BUSINESS
August 3, 1987 | By Neill Borowski, Inquirer Staff Writer
R. Michael Peele believes that people want special attention when it comes to removing caviar spots from their $500 suits and cognac stains from their cashmere sweaters. Since May, Peele and his partners, Charles Hallinan and Stephen Simyak, have opened 13 upscale and pricey Brittany's Ltd. dry-cleaning stores in the Philadelphia suburbs and expect to open as many as 30 this year. If nothing else, their plans are ambitious. They're counting on a class of customer who wears only natural fibers and believes the only place for petroleum derivatives is in their luxury cars.
NEWS
January 15, 2001 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The assignment was strictly voluntary, but for city prison inmates, it provided experience for a real job upon release. Now a growing number of former and current Philadelphia inmates say what they got from working in the dry-cleaning plant at the 74-year-old House of Correction were chronic medical problems. In the last six months, 18 current and former city inmates - 13 women and five men - have sued the city over injuries purportedly caused by exposure to leaked or dumped perchloroethylene.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 2, 2013
C ENTER CITY RESIDENT HanNa Jung, 31, redefined her family's University City dry-cleaning business by adding a trendy boutique in October 2011. A Moore College of Art & Design alumna, she used more than $10,000 in personal savings for renovation and inventory. The businesses - Bonded Boutique and Bonded Boutique Cleaner - had combined revenues of about $400,000 in 2012. Previously, Jung was a product-development manager at Alexander Doll Co. in New York and also worked with fashion designer Jason Wu. Q: How did you come up with the idea for combining the two businesses?
NEWS
March 18, 2012
Lots of vacation trips, on-site gyms, personal trainers, and paintball excursions are among the many benefits that companies offer. Some throw out the dress code. We asked about special perks and incentives that employers are providing. These are partial responses: Shire P.L.C. Benefits include a free on-site gym, bi-weekly deliveries of locally- and sustainably-grown produce through the Farm-to-Shire program, two on-site cafeterias, on-site conference center and catering, dry-cleaning pickup and delivery, and priority parking for eco-friendly vehicles.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2010
Steamy shower sex is extremely complicated. First, you have to create "steam. " Technically, it's not really steam, since the water would have to be 212 degrees. Not even my wife, who gets comfortable around 200 degrees, likes her showers that hot. What people called "steam" in this case is actually a mist formed by the moist warm air of the shower coming in contact with the cooler, drier air of the bathroom. This involves getting the shower water hot enough and the bathroom air cold enough to produce the "steam.
NEWS
June 5, 2010
New Jersey will use $5 million from settlements with three coal-fired power companies operating in the Midwest to reduce local use of a dry-cleaning chemical identified as a likely carcinogen. Perchloroethylene is a known central nervous system depressant. Replacing dry-cleaning machines that use it costs $45,000 to $60,000. There are about 1,700 in the state. The Department of Environmental Protection offers businesses $25,000 with the option of more if they convert to a greener, "wet-cleaning" system.
NEWS
April 18, 2007 | By Edward Colimore, Nancy Petersen and Anthony R. Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The rain-swollen creek that flooded dozens of Lumberton homes on Sunday and Monday had receded. Main Street was reopened, students were back in school, and utility workers were restoring power. Life in this Burlington County town was slowly returning to normal yesterday, even for the 70 evacuees who returned to properties that received minor damage. Many others, though, including Richard Nicholson, who survived the community's devastating 2004 flood, will have to start over - again.
SPORTS
November 19, 2006 | By Pete Schnatz INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
LaMott Ebron, Jeremy Ortiz and Christopher Lawrence are as Philly as you can get. Inner-city teenagers weaned on cheesesteaks, soft pretzels and late-night games of pickup on dimly lit blacktop courts. But when they huddle in front of the television to catch today's Ford 400 from Homestead-Miami Speedway, each will think back to a potentially life-changing week they spent in North Carolina more than three months ago - and wholeheartedly root for a Californian, series leader Jimmie Johnson, to win his first Nextel Cup. Part of a delegation of 21 students from the Philadelphia-based Urban Youth Racing School, the trio headed to the Charlotte area in the second week of August for a whirlwind tour of team race shops.
NEWS
June 16, 2006 | By Paula M. Riley
Visitors to my kitchen often stop at the fridge to eye the photos of many youngsters. Bright smiles of happy nieces and nephews stare back at them. Just beneath these photos and above the letter magnets is an old, pink dry-cleaning receipt. Though crinkled, it is easy to see behind its plastic covering. In hurried handwriting, Claim Tag No. 1803 reads: 2/20, Mr. J. Riley, 382-0545. Some friends notice it and inquire; others assume my shirts are still hanging in the backroom of Cadet Cleaners.
SPORTS
April 5, 2006 | Daily News Wire Services
Two days before righthander Kris Benson was scheduled to make his Baltimore Orioles debut, his outspoken wife, Anna, withdrew her petition for divorce. Anna Benson, an actress and model who has posed topless, filed for divorce in Atlanta on March 31. The petition for divorce claimed the marriage was "irretrievably broken. " Anna Benson's attorney, Jeffrey B. Bogart, said the petition was withdrawn yesterday. Asked why she changed her mind so quickly, Bogart said: "I think Anna did some soul-searching over the weekend and decided that she wanted to make every effort to repair her marriage.
NEWS
November 9, 2004 | By Thomas J. Gibbons Jr. INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The owner of a Wynnefield dry-cleaning business was fatally shot during an apparent robbery minutes after he opened his store yesterday, police said. A customer found Ki-Young Hong, 42, of Blue Bell, collapsed behind the counter near the rear of the store about 7:25 a.m., said Lt. Philip J. Riehl of the Homicide Division. Hong, who was married, the father of two boys, and a deacon in his church, was shot several times. He was pronounced dead in his store. His murder stunned both employees and customers of the business, Betty Brite Cleaners, on Wynnefield Avenue near Bryn Mawr Avenue, near SEPTA's Wynnefield train station.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2004 | By Annette John-Hall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
We're getting a little too needy when it comes to Desperate Housewives. Seduced by this new show featuring saucy women wearing couture and serving pie, we're acting like jilted lovers on the rebound. Sex and the City abandoned us. Friends faded away. Soul Food said, "See ya. " So after Sarah Jessica Parker cast us aside as if we were low-slung jeans in a pencil-skirt season, we latched onto the next thing that seemed to understand what women really want - and that is happiness via sex, clothes, money, men and chocolate.
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