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NEWS
September 22, 2014 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The sun was soon to set one evening last week, and the late-summer breeze was soft as friends Kendall Ratterree, 27, and Laura Rhoads, 28, sat at an outdoor table of a corner cafe enjoying glasses of Pinot Grigio. "This is our first time," Ratterree, a nanny, said. "We heard about it, and we figured we'd check it out," said Rhoads, a Realtor. An evening in Paris? A hot new cafe in Rome? Try Jersey Java & Teas in Haddonfield. Dry Haddonfield. Two weeks ago, the Haddon Avenue cafe became the first Haddonfield establishment to become part of a phenomenon that is growing statewide: Businesses like cafes, restaurants, and shops that agree to provide space to one of the state's wineries so the wineries can sell bottles of their wine.
NEWS
May 4, 2012 | Breaking News Desk
It's been 139 years since they served beer in Haddonfield's Indian King Tavern. But that will change Saturday when barrels of Colonial style beers will be tapped at a fund-raiser for the museum and historic site, meeting place of the New Jersey Rebel Assembly in 1777. Since Haddonfield has been dry since 1873, organizers have obtained a special permit from the state to sell beer to help pay for renovations at the tavern. Philadelphia's Yards Brewery is supplying the beer and food will be served.
NEWS
June 1, 2001 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Think that purchasing an ice-cold beer is impossible in this dry town? Think again. For many of the 1,500 folks who crowded into the McLaughlin-Norcross Memorial Dell this week for a free concert sponsored by the county, the $3 cups of Flying Fish Ale complemented an evening of fine weather and good music. For Albert Olizi, the borough solicitor, it was a bit more complicated. Ten minutes before Patti Shea - who was the warm-up act for the band Grey Eye Glances - opened the show at 7 p.m., Olizi began receiving phone calls from neighbors concerned about alcohol sales.
NEWS
February 24, 2005
IT'S NOT that I don't want the West River Drive renamed - that's a fine idea - but I have an even better one. I think New Jersey Route 73, extending from the Tacony-Palmyra Bridge to Moorestown, should be renamed Martin Luther King Jr. Highway. It was not being denied service in the segregated South that inspired MLK to launch his nonviolent campaign - it was right in the Delaware Valley where he and others were treated badly at the Moorestown Pub on Route 73 just outside of the dry town of Moorestown.
NEWS
March 28, 2002 | By Kaitlin Gurney INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The zoning board in this dry town voted unanimously last night to grant a variance allowing a family of aspiring vintners to bottle and sell their inaugural label at their roadside farm stand. Bill and Penni Heritage, whose family has been farming a 150-acre plot since 1850, began planting grapes three years ago in an attempt to find a profitable alternative to their peach and apple orchards. They now have six acres of chardonnay and cabernet vines, and the first barrels of wine are fermenting in an old wood cellar.
NEWS
November 7, 2002
Willingboro took another big step toward reinventing itself by approving a referendum Tuesday to issue restaurant liquor licenses. South Jersey's "Levittown" has struggled in the last 20 years as fancier houses and larger shopping malls lured residents elsewhere in Burlington County. By the late 1990s, 57 percent of Willingboro's commercial property was vacant. That slide slowed, thankfully, in 1998 when Renewal Realty began transforming Willingboro Plaza on Route 130 into a new town center.
NEWS
August 7, 2012
The Moorestown Township Council has awarded four liquor licenses to the operator of Moorestown Mall for slightly more than $4 million. The Pennsylvania Real Estate Investment Trust (PREIT) plans to use the licenses, the first awarded in the previously historically dry town, at as-yet-unidentified restaurants expected to open next year. The council voted unanimously Monday to accept the liquor license proposals submitted by PREIT's subsidiaries, Moorestown Beverage I and Moorestown Beverage II. The companies must undergo background checks before the licenses are formally issued in the next month or so, Town Clerk Patricia Hunt said.
NEWS
May 10, 2008 | By Mari A. Schaefer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A social club serving alcohol at the Colwyn Borough Fire Company was raided by state police Thursday night, while at the same time all 17 active volunteer firefighters resigned, citing conflicts with the department's social-club members. The Pennsylvania State Police Bureau of Liquor Control seized two illegal video slot machines, other gambling equipment, approximately 10 bottles of liquor purchased from outside of the state and about $2,100 in cash. Colwyn is a dry town and licenses to sell alcohol are not issued in the borough, a state official said.
NEWS
July 15, 1997 | By Angela Couloumbis, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The possibility of wining while dining in town moved one step closer to becoming a reality last night when the six-member Borough Council voted 5-0 to issue the borough's first liquor consumption license. While Merchantville is not a dry town - there are two liquor stores - the one restaurant in town is not licensed to serve spirits, Mayor Pat Brennan said. Under state alcoholic beverage control laws, the borough is permitted to issue one such license, in proportion to its population.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 22, 2014 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The sun was soon to set one evening last week, and the late-summer breeze was soft as friends Kendall Ratterree, 27, and Laura Rhoads, 28, sat at an outdoor table of a corner cafe enjoying glasses of Pinot Grigio. "This is our first time," Ratterree, a nanny, said. "We heard about it, and we figured we'd check it out," said Rhoads, a Realtor. An evening in Paris? A hot new cafe in Rome? Try Jersey Java & Teas in Haddonfield. Dry Haddonfield. Two weeks ago, the Haddon Avenue cafe became the first Haddonfield establishment to become part of a phenomenon that is growing statewide: Businesses like cafes, restaurants, and shops that agree to provide space to one of the state's wineries so the wineries can sell bottles of their wine.
NEWS
August 9, 2012
The Moorestown Township Council has awarded four liquor licenses to the operator of Moorestown Mall for slightly more than $4 million. The Pennsylvania Real Estate Investment Trust (PREIT) plans to use the licenses, the first awarded in the previously historically dry town, at as-yet-unidentified restaurants expected to open next year. The council voted unanimously Monday to accept the liquor license proposals submitted by PREIT's subsidiaries, Moorestown Beverage I and Moorestown Beverage II. The companies must undergo background checks before the licenses are formally issued in the next month or so, Town Clerk Patricia Hunt said.
NEWS
May 4, 2012 | Breaking News Desk
It's been 139 years since they served beer in Haddonfield's Indian King Tavern. But that will change Saturday when barrels of Colonial style beers will be tapped at a fund-raiser for the museum and historic site, meeting place of the New Jersey Rebel Assembly in 1777. Since Haddonfield has been dry since 1873, organizers have obtained a special permit from the state to sell beer to help pay for renovations at the tavern. Philadelphia's Yards Brewery is supplying the beer and food will be served.
NEWS
October 20, 2011 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
A New Jersey appeals panel on Wednesday denied a request to strike Moorestown's liquor referendum from the ballot, saying it is proper for voters to be asked on Nov. 8 whether they want to allow alcohol sales in the dry town. The Appellate Division panel issued a two-sentence written opinion that upheld the validity of the referendum, based on the findings of state Superior Court Judge Ronald E. Bookbinder, who ruled last week. William E. Cox, a Moorestown resident and Philadelphia lawyer, sued to stop the referendum, arguing that the town voted on the issue in 2007 and defeated it, 4,202-2,559.
NEWS
July 31, 2011 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
OCEAN CITY, N.J. - This is a long island, eight miles of superb beaches, but a very small place. City is a whopper of a misnomer for this town of almost 12,000 year-round residents. Everyone knows everyone. Jay Gillian, the shorts-clad mayor, local hospital chairman, and third-generation owner of Gillian's Wonderland Pier, is a leading opponent of the effort to lubricate this dry island with BYOB liquor licenses. This week is the petition deadline to put the measure on the November ballot.
NEWS
September 29, 2009 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's been 130 years since brothers Ezra, S. Wesley and James Lake sailed along this barrier island in search of a spot to develop a Christian resort - a seaside haven where the Sabbath would be strictly upheld and alcohol sales would forever be banned. The "blue law," which prevented the purchase of everything from canned goods to beach toys on Sundays, was repealed in 1987. But Ocean City's status as a dry town remains fiercely protected by the city's largest religious organization, founded by the Lakes when they created their Methodist camp retreat.
NEWS
June 20, 2009 | By Sam Adams FOR THE INQUIRER
It's easy to get lost in Hayes Carll's songs, even if you're the one singing them. Midway through playing "Arkansas Blues" at the Tin Angel on Thursday night, Carll digressed into a story about getting his start playing a rundown members-only club in a dry town, and by the time he was done, he'd lost his place. With a wry grin, he called out, "Anyone heard this song before?" As it turned out, a few members of the sellout crowd were able to assist him, but it wasn't long before he was wandering again.
NEWS
February 8, 2009 | By Matt Katz INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
To the first resident of Collingswood's newest development, living is easy. The dry cleaner downstairs knows her name, the guy at the salad place remembers her dressing, and to get a pedicure "I don't even have to put on my shoes. " To the proprietor of the first-floor jewelry shop, the LumberYard development represents what's great about Collingswood's progressive approach to economic revitalization. "City living in the suburbs," she calls it. But to the lifelong Collingswood man who lives several blocks away, the problems are that his taxes are propping up a development that could fail, the rest of the town has been forsaken for the Haddon Avenue commercial corridor, and the mayor is "the sugar daddy for everybody" but those who already live there.
NEWS
May 10, 2008 | By Mari A. Schaefer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A social club serving alcohol at the Colwyn Borough Fire Company was raided by state police Thursday night, while at the same time all 17 active volunteer firefighters resigned, citing conflicts with the department's social-club members. The Pennsylvania State Police Bureau of Liquor Control seized two illegal video slot machines, other gambling equipment, approximately 10 bottles of liquor purchased from outside of the state and about $2,100 in cash. Colwyn is a dry town and licenses to sell alcohol are not issued in the borough, a state official said.
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