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NEWS
August 4, 2015 | By Caitlin McCabe, Inquirer Staff Writer
The quiet Red Lantern Tavern in Glenolden is no stranger to patrons from outside the one-square- mile borough: On a typical night, manager Bob Simone sees clientele trickle in from nearly every nearby Delaware County town. Some meet friends. Others stop by to chat with Simone. But a vast, distinctive group of customers - nearly 1 in 4, Simone estimates - flocks to his local watering hole because they have no other choice. They live in Sharon Hill, and they want a drink. For decades, Sharon Hill locals wanting to buy alcohol have been confronted with only two options: Buy a drink elsewhere or don't drink at all. Their borough is completely dry. No bars.
NEWS
September 22, 2014 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The sun was soon to set one evening last week, and the late-summer breeze was soft as friends Kendall Ratterree, 27, and Laura Rhoads, 28, sat at an outdoor table of a corner cafe enjoying glasses of Pinot Grigio. "This is our first time," Ratterree, a nanny, said. "We heard about it, and we figured we'd check it out," said Rhoads, a Realtor. An evening in Paris? A hot new cafe in Rome? Try Jersey Java & Teas in Haddonfield. Dry Haddonfield. Two weeks ago, the Haddon Avenue cafe became the first Haddonfield establishment to become part of a phenomenon that is growing statewide: Businesses like cafes, restaurants, and shops that agree to provide space to one of the state's wineries so the wineries can sell bottles of their wine.
NEWS
May 4, 2012 | Breaking News Desk
It's been 139 years since they served beer in Haddonfield's Indian King Tavern. But that will change Saturday when barrels of Colonial style beers will be tapped at a fund-raiser for the museum and historic site, meeting place of the New Jersey Rebel Assembly in 1777. Since Haddonfield has been dry since 1873, organizers have obtained a special permit from the state to sell beer to help pay for renovations at the tavern. Philadelphia's Yards Brewery is supplying the beer and food will be served.
NEWS
June 1, 2001 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Think that purchasing an ice-cold beer is impossible in this dry town? Think again. For many of the 1,500 folks who crowded into the McLaughlin-Norcross Memorial Dell this week for a free concert sponsored by the county, the $3 cups of Flying Fish Ale complemented an evening of fine weather and good music. For Albert Olizi, the borough solicitor, it was a bit more complicated. Ten minutes before Patti Shea - who was the warm-up act for the band Grey Eye Glances - opened the show at 7 p.m., Olizi began receiving phone calls from neighbors concerned about alcohol sales.
NEWS
October 26, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Many customers at Sweet Lula's - the unusual, urbane, and entertaining restaurant that has put Pitman on the fine-dining map - ask the same question of the owners. What are you doing here? It's a long story, and it's likely to take another twist: After nearly eight years on the borough's South Broadway, owners Anthony and Louise "Lula" Asbury say they're looking to relocate to Philadelphia. Such a move would mean renaming and downsizing (but not closing or selling, the couple hasten to add)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2016
THERE ARE NO saloons in Pitman, N.J. No bottle shops or restaurants with liquor licenses, either. This is a dry town, a vestige of its founding as a Methodist retreat. Yet on Saturday afternoon, with a ceremonial tapping of the first keg, a brewery will open on Broadway, the Gloucester County town's main drag. A brewery with a tasting room and eight taps and plenty of suds. And that's not all, for by the end of summer, a second brewery is expected to open a mere two doors down the street - a veritable brewery row in a borough where, for 100 years, the closest thing to a stiff drink was a bottle of hair tonic at the barbershop.
NEWS
September 14, 2015 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
A town center project slated for Harrison Township's Richwood section was for years the buzz about town. The walkable hub boasting major retailers and new homes - even a new elementary school and town hall were floated - would create a destination in the town known for its bucolic setting and charming, historic Mullica Hill. Lately, it's a lack of buzz that's got some talking. The same year ambitious details about the massive 370-acre Richwood project were announced, in 2008, residents in the Gloucester County town voted to allow liquor licenses for full-service restaurants and bars - ending Harrison's longtime status as a dry town.
NEWS
February 24, 2005
IT'S NOT that I don't want the West River Drive renamed - that's a fine idea - but I have an even better one. I think New Jersey Route 73, extending from the Tacony-Palmyra Bridge to Moorestown, should be renamed Martin Luther King Jr. Highway. It was not being denied service in the segregated South that inspired MLK to launch his nonviolent campaign - it was right in the Delaware Valley where he and others were treated badly at the Moorestown Pub on Route 73 just outside of the dry town of Moorestown.
NEWS
March 28, 2002 | By Kaitlin Gurney INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The zoning board in this dry town voted unanimously last night to grant a variance allowing a family of aspiring vintners to bottle and sell their inaugural label at their roadside farm stand. Bill and Penni Heritage, whose family has been farming a 150-acre plot since 1850, began planting grapes three years ago in an attempt to find a profitable alternative to their peach and apple orchards. They now have six acres of chardonnay and cabernet vines, and the first barrels of wine are fermenting in an old wood cellar.
NEWS
November 7, 2002
Willingboro took another big step toward reinventing itself by approving a referendum Tuesday to issue restaurant liquor licenses. South Jersey's "Levittown" has struggled in the last 20 years as fancier houses and larger shopping malls lured residents elsewhere in Burlington County. By the late 1990s, 57 percent of Willingboro's commercial property was vacant. That slide slowed, thankfully, in 1998 when Renewal Realty began transforming Willingboro Plaza on Route 130 into a new town center.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2016
THERE ARE NO saloons in Pitman, N.J. No bottle shops or restaurants with liquor licenses, either. This is a dry town, a vestige of its founding as a Methodist retreat. Yet on Saturday afternoon, with a ceremonial tapping of the first keg, a brewery will open on Broadway, the Gloucester County town's main drag. A brewery with a tasting room and eight taps and plenty of suds. And that's not all, for by the end of summer, a second brewery is expected to open a mere two doors down the street - a veritable brewery row in a borough where, for 100 years, the closest thing to a stiff drink was a bottle of hair tonic at the barbershop.
NEWS
October 26, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Many customers at Sweet Lula's - the unusual, urbane, and entertaining restaurant that has put Pitman on the fine-dining map - ask the same question of the owners. What are you doing here? It's a long story, and it's likely to take another twist: After nearly eight years on the borough's South Broadway, owners Anthony and Louise "Lula" Asbury say they're looking to relocate to Philadelphia. Such a move would mean renaming and downsizing (but not closing or selling, the couple hasten to add)
NEWS
September 14, 2015 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
A town center project slated for Harrison Township's Richwood section was for years the buzz about town. The walkable hub boasting major retailers and new homes - even a new elementary school and town hall were floated - would create a destination in the town known for its bucolic setting and charming, historic Mullica Hill. Lately, it's a lack of buzz that's got some talking. The same year ambitious details about the massive 370-acre Richwood project were announced, in 2008, residents in the Gloucester County town voted to allow liquor licenses for full-service restaurants and bars - ending Harrison's longtime status as a dry town.
NEWS
August 4, 2015 | By Caitlin McCabe, Inquirer Staff Writer
The quiet Red Lantern Tavern in Glenolden is no stranger to patrons from outside the one-square- mile borough: On a typical night, manager Bob Simone sees clientele trickle in from nearly every nearby Delaware County town. Some meet friends. Others stop by to chat with Simone. But a vast, distinctive group of customers - nearly 1 in 4, Simone estimates - flocks to his local watering hole because they have no other choice. They live in Sharon Hill, and they want a drink. For decades, Sharon Hill locals wanting to buy alcohol have been confronted with only two options: Buy a drink elsewhere or don't drink at all. Their borough is completely dry. No bars.
NEWS
July 6, 2015 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
What might be one of the next stops in the Garden State's growing craft brew scene? Try the dry town of Collingswood. On Monday, South Jersey's version of Northern Liberties is expected to introduce an ordinance that would allow craft breweries to operate in the borough. It could be approved as soon as early August. The decision to proceed with the ordinance comes after months of study and opinion-taking. "The overwhelming response from residents has been in favor with a firm expression that breweries would be a great complement to our business district," Mayor James Maley said.
NEWS
September 22, 2014 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The sun was soon to set one evening last week, and the late-summer breeze was soft as friends Kendall Ratterree, 27, and Laura Rhoads, 28, sat at an outdoor table of a corner cafe enjoying glasses of Pinot Grigio. "This is our first time," Ratterree, a nanny, said. "We heard about it, and we figured we'd check it out," said Rhoads, a Realtor. An evening in Paris? A hot new cafe in Rome? Try Jersey Java & Teas in Haddonfield. Dry Haddonfield. Two weeks ago, the Haddon Avenue cafe became the first Haddonfield establishment to become part of a phenomenon that is growing statewide: Businesses like cafes, restaurants, and shops that agree to provide space to one of the state's wineries so the wineries can sell bottles of their wine.
NEWS
August 9, 2012
The Moorestown Township Council has awarded four liquor licenses to the operator of Moorestown Mall for slightly more than $4 million. The Pennsylvania Real Estate Investment Trust (PREIT) plans to use the licenses, the first awarded in the previously historically dry town, at as-yet-unidentified restaurants expected to open next year. The council voted unanimously Monday to accept the liquor license proposals submitted by PREIT's subsidiaries, Moorestown Beverage I and Moorestown Beverage II. The companies must undergo background checks before the licenses are formally issued in the next month or so, Town Clerk Patricia Hunt said.
NEWS
May 4, 2012 | Breaking News Desk
It's been 139 years since they served beer in Haddonfield's Indian King Tavern. But that will change Saturday when barrels of Colonial style beers will be tapped at a fund-raiser for the museum and historic site, meeting place of the New Jersey Rebel Assembly in 1777. Since Haddonfield has been dry since 1873, organizers have obtained a special permit from the state to sell beer to help pay for renovations at the tavern. Philadelphia's Yards Brewery is supplying the beer and food will be served.
NEWS
October 20, 2011 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
A New Jersey appeals panel on Wednesday denied a request to strike Moorestown's liquor referendum from the ballot, saying it is proper for voters to be asked on Nov. 8 whether they want to allow alcohol sales in the dry town. The Appellate Division panel issued a two-sentence written opinion that upheld the validity of the referendum, based on the findings of state Superior Court Judge Ronald E. Bookbinder, who ruled last week. William E. Cox, a Moorestown resident and Philadelphia lawyer, sued to stop the referendum, arguing that the town voted on the issue in 2007 and defeated it, 4,202-2,559.
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