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Du Pont

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NEWS
March 19, 1996 | By Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lawyers for John E. du Pont yesterday asked that his arraignment, scheduled for Thursday in Delaware County Court, be postponed to give the defense team time to get results from a court-ordered evaluation of du Pont's competency to stand trial. If the postponement is not granted, they requested that they be given more time before disclosing whether they plan to make du Pont's mental state an issue in their defense. The defense attorneys' requests were quickly opposed by the Delaware County District Attorney's Office.
NEWS
February 5, 1996 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
His family is insisting that John du Pont is mentally ill, that he's been acting queerly for years. His lawyers might want that behavior to continue - at least for a while longer. The first few weeks after his arrest may prove to be the most critical to du Pont's defense if his attorneys intend to claim that du Pont was legally insane when he allegedly shot to death Olympic wrestler Dave Schultz, say lawyers who have defended mentally ill criminal defendents. "You have to get defendants when they are delusional," said Paul Conway, chief of homicide and special defense for the Defender Association of Philadelphia.
NEWS
December 31, 1996 | by Don Russell, Daily News Staff Writer
John E. du Pont didn't make it home for Christmas, and he won't be home to ring in the new year. To the surprise of no one, Delaware County Judge Patricia H. Jenkins yesterday denied bail to the millionaire accused-killer for a third time this year. Du Pont, 58, will remain incarcerated at Norristown State Hospital until his trial starts on Jan. 21. The chemicals heir is accused of shooting Olympic gold medal wrestler Dave Schultz at du Pont's Foxcatcher Farms athletic compound in Newtown Square last Jan. 26. Du Pont's attorneys had asked on Christmas Eve that their client be permitted to return to his sprawling estate.
NEWS
April 9, 1996 | by Don Russell, Daily News Staff Writer
After nine weeks in a jail cell, millionaire accused killer John E. du Pont is losing his grip, and his lawyers want him out. The attorneys yesterday asked a Delaware County judge to set bail for the chemicals heir, claiming his "physical condition and overall well-being has deteriorated" since he was locked up on Super Bowl Sunday, Jan. 28. "We didn't think we could wait any longer," said defense attorney William Lamb. He said a court-ordered mental competency examination likely will not be held till mid-May.
NEWS
March 29, 1988
For Du Pont, the chemical giant, production of chorofluorocarbons - Feon, for instance - is a $600 million-a-year business. So it has been unsurprising that the company didn't rush to join cause with scientists who wanted them banned to spare the earth's protective layer of ozone - the stuff that blocks sun rays that can cause skin cancer. But faced with new evidence that Feon-type substances are on more of a rampage than previously thought, Du Pont called boldly last week for their total phase-out, one-upping a 31-nation treaty that requires reduction by 50 percent.
NEWS
June 5, 1996 | by Don Russell, Daily News Staff Writer
If millionaire accused-killer John E. du Pont is freed on bail, he'll never return for trial, a prosecutor charged yesterday. Certain that the eccentric marksman has already plotted his escape, Delaware County Special Assistant District Attorney Dennis McAndrews told a state Superior Court panel that a lower court judge was correct in denying du Pont bail last month. "We will not bring this man to trial if he is released on bail," McAndrews told the panel. Du Pont is accused in the Jan. 26 slaying of Olympic gold medal wrestler Dave Schultz.
NEWS
January 25, 1990 | By Mike Franolich, Special to The Inquirer The Associated Press contributed to this article
A large tank containing recycled sulfuric acid exploded yesterday afternoon in Salem County, rocking Du Pont Co.'s Chambers Works plant in Deepwater, officials said. The tank exploded at 1:36 p.m. at the center of Du Pont's largest chemical plant, said Kelli Kukura, a company spokeswoman. The 30,000-gallon-capacity tank contained about 22,000 gallons of recycled sulfuric acid. The explosion created a thick cloud of smoke, officials said. The ensuing fire was brought under control in half an hour and extinguished by about 3 p.m., officials said.
NEWS
February 18, 1988 | By Susan Bennett, Inquirer Washington Bureau Ellen Warren, Bill Arthur, Nolan Walters, Lee Bandy, Andrew Cassel, Owen Ullmann and Doreen Carvajal of The Inquirer Washington Bureau also contributed to this article
Two of the big losers in the New Hampshire primary - Republican Pete du Pont of Delaware and Democrat Bruce Babbitt - were expected to drop out of the race today, as the big winners prepared for the critical Super Tuesday primaries in the South. Du Pont, who won just 10 percent of the GOP vote in New Hampshire, scheduled a news conference in Wilmington. Campaign sources said he will announce his withdrawal. And campaign aides and supporters of Babbitt, the former Arizona governor who placed sixth in New Hampshire with just 5 percent of the vote, said yesterday that he is expected to become the first Democrat to withdraw from the presidential race.
BUSINESS
September 15, 1988 | By Kevin Haney, Daily News Staff Writer The Associated Press and Reuters contributed to this report
The board of directors of Du Pont Co. yesterday dubbed Edgar S. Woolard Jr. as its new chairman, come 1989. Woolard, with the Wilmington-based industrial giant since 1957, will replace Richard E. Heckert as chairman and chief executive, the company said yesterday. Woolard, 54, has been Du Pont's president since March 1, 1987. He will take the helm when Heckert retires after Du Pont's annual meeting next April. The mandatory retirement age for CEOs at Du Pont is 65; Heckert turns 65 in January.
NEWS
May 29, 1996 | By Bill Ordine, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lawyers for John E. du Pont yesterday filed an emergency petition asking the state Supreme Court to stop a hearing concerning competency issues scheduled for tomorrow in Delaware County Court. Late in the day, the prosecution countered with its own request that the full court consider the matter. In its emergency petition, du Pont's defense team asked the Supreme Court to direct Delaware County Judge Patricia Jenkins to "cease and desist from acting in excess of [her] jurisdiction by conducting further proceedings regarding [du Pont's]
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
August 4, 2016 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Staff Writer
Chemours , the chemical maker spun off by DuPont last year with some of that company's dirtiest industrial plants, has decided to stay put in Wilmington. CEO Mark Vergnano cited the corporate-tax reductions passed by the Democratic legislature and signed by Gov. Jack Markell in the "Delaware Competes Act" as a reason not to move to New Jersey or Pennsylvania. "This legislation isn't about Chemours specifically," Markell spokeswoman Courtney McGregor told me. As DuPont fragments, the state has stepped up efforts to keep not just Chemours but also two other planned DuPont successor companies from fleeing, the way paint-making spin-off Axalta moved its headquarters to Philadelphia two years ago. Delaware used to tax business operations: The more you had, the more you paid.
NEWS
April 22, 2016 | By Tia Yang, Staff Writer
Robert L. Frank, 90, a former financial analyst, died Monday, April 18, of pneumonia at Harlee Manor Nursing Facility in Springfield, Delaware County, where he had resided for 31/2 years. The third of eight children, Mr. Frank was a dedicated member of the Springfield Township community, where he grew up, delivered newspapers, and served as an altar boy at St. Francis of Assisi parish. He was a Boy Scout - certified as an Eagle Scout in 1943 - and remained active in scouting throughout most of his life.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, CULTURE WRITER
The Main Fountain Garden at Longwood Gardens is a muddy mess these days. Great ruts of wheelprints gash the wet dirt. Pools of water collect in oozy lakes. Planks laid on the ground allow teetering passage for those without boots or waders. Shrieking beeps of backing construction machines pierce the air. And it all looks just the way it's supposed to. "It's not too often that you get to see Versailles being built," Paul B. Redman, Longwood's executive director, said as he took it all in from a high terrace in front of the Longwood Conservatory.
BUSINESS
March 29, 2016 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Staff Writer
DuPont Co. collected $2.5 billion in after-tax profits last year. Dow Chemical Co. collected $4 billion. They aren't guaranteeing how many of the 5,000 or so people they still employ in Delaware will still have jobs when they are done merging and then splitting into three successor companies in a couple of years. So Delaware Gov. Jack Markell and state legislators from both parties say they felt they didn't have much choice but to give these highly profitable chemical-makers millions in grants and tax concessions, in hopes they won't fire or move more people away.
BUSINESS
March 16, 2016 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Staff Writer
Just three months after he was named DuPont Co.'s top plastics executive, Patrick E. Lindner has quit the company where he worked for 20 years to join Delaware-based W.L. Gore & Associates, the privately held $3 billion developer of Gore-Tex fabrics. "He brings a broad range of complementary experience and expertise to Gore," Gore spokeswoman Amy Calhoun said Monday. "We're confident he will contribute in many ways. " Gore, which employs 10,000, eschews traditional business titles.
BUSINESS
March 4, 2016 | By Joseph N. Distefano, Staff Writer
Dow Chemical Co. and the DuPont Co. have agreed to pay Dow's lame-duck CEO, Andrew Liveris, $53 million in cash, stock, and tax reimbursement payments, and DuPont CEO Edward Breen $27 million in 2017 after the combined companies break into three successor firms, the companies told investors and the Securities and Exchange Commission in a filing Wednesday. The CEOs have assembled these multimillion-dollar pay packages, which the company filing calls "golden parachutes," while planning and executing billions of dollars in cost cuts and plant and warehouse closings.
BUSINESS
February 23, 2016
Battered by years of corporate departures, Delaware elected officials bragged as if they'd won the lottery when DuPont Co. and Dow Chemical Co. said the new corporation they are forming to sell pesticides and seeds will have world headquarters not at its Iowa-based crop seeds group, nor at Dow's Indianapolis pesticides business, but at DuPont's Chestnut Run office complex near Wilmington. Yet it's not clear this will add any Delaware jobs. DuPont and Dow plan more cost cuts in advance of their merger later this year.
BUSINESS
February 21, 2016 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Staff Writer
In what Gov. Jack Markell called "a win for Delaware," the DuPont Co. and Dow Chemical Co. said Friday that they had picked DuPont's Chestnut Run office complex outside Wilmington as the headquarters for top officials of their planned new combined pesticide and seed company, which will bear the DuPont name. Delaware promised income-tax rebates for workers earning above $70,000 a year, $6 million in construction capital expenditure grants, and $3.6 million "to support employment" to keep the headquarters, state officials said in a statement.
BUSINESS
January 13, 2016
Scholars, shareholders, the newly separated, and the long-frustrated have plenty to say about cuts to the central research and business units at DuPont Co. by new CEO Edward Breen . Some highlights: "DuPont struggled with return on R&D over the years," notes Ben duPont , a shareholder and past manager at the chemical giant that bears his ancestor's name. "For 40 years, like a drumbeat, every few years DuPont introduced a new blockbuster product - nylon, Teflon, Tyvek, Delrin, Kevlar, Lycra, Kapton, Neoprene, Mylar . " (They weren't all blockbusters; duPont still has a pair of Corfam shoes - the Edsel of leather.)
BUSINESS
January 11, 2016
The gang now running DuPont Co. , that incubator of 20th-century U.S. industry, is scrapping many of its Wilmington headquarters institutions, as if they were old Rust Belt factories. Glowing paints and super plastics, miracle fabrics and insulators, electronics and fuel additives and their often toxic by-products are just a few of DuPont's highlights. Its science and engineering created that new-car smell, the snug and cleanable feel of a mass-marketed American home, and the security and menace of a fully equipped American soldier.
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