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NEWS
June 16, 2000
Today is Bloomsday, and we're not talking cherry blossoms. June 16 is the date when Leopold Bloom, hero of James Joyce's epic novel "Ulysses," made his odyssey through Dublin, Ireland. So what, you may say. Well, "Ulysses" is one of the most influential books of the 20th century. Funny, irreverent, full of barely comprehensible word play - and the original manuscript resides not in Dublin but in our own wonderful and underappreciated Rosenbach Museum at 2010 Delancey Place, repository of an amazing collection of rare books and art. Today from noon to 6, in front of the Rosenbach, a variety of Philadelphians, including Police Commissioner John Timoney, radio host Marty Moss-Coane and TV personality Ulysses "Ukee" Washington, will read from "Ulysses.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1991 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
In Dublin's fair city, the girls are so . . . waifish. At least The Girl With Green Eyes is. This 1964 feature starring the delightful Rita Tushingham as a stray cat of a girl rescued by writer Peter Finch is a mood piece as memorable for their performances as for the Dublin locations. "The Girl With Green Eyes" will be with "Waltz of the Toreadors," a comedy starring Peter Sllers, tomorrow at 7 p.m. at Film Forum/Philadelphia, Philadelphia Center, 509 S. Broad St. (w) Tickets are $4; $3 for members and full-time students.
NEWS
May 20, 2009 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
Inis Nua, dedicated to contemporary drama from Ireland, England, Scotland, and Wales, presents Mark O'Rowe's Made in China, a stunningly nasty play about Dublin's thugworld. The accents are thick (what did he say?), the slang is low (what does that mean?), and the violence is vicious: If the three actors - all giving terrific performances - live through the run, it will be thanks to their skill and courage and the brilliant fight choreography of J. Alex Cordaro. A thug named Hughie (Jered McLenigan, whose honeyed baritone serves him well here, creating a sense of humanity crucial to his character)
LIVING
November 12, 2000 | By Dianna Marder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Cass Kimrey likes to tell about how her son went all the way to Ireland to meet the girl next door. Jim Kimrey, 35, a sergeant in the Philadelphia Police Department and a saxophonist in the Avalon String Band, is the prototypical South Philadelphian - carrying on in his father's footsteps as a police officer and a Mummer, living in his grade-school parish, and remodeling the home his paternal great-grandfather bought after emigrating from Lithuania....
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 2011 | By Howard Shapiro, Inquirer Staff Writer
NEW YORK - In April, as part of an Irish theater festival in which several professional Philadelphia companies took part, a curious little play called Dublin by Lamplight , with all the actors in clownface, opened in Center City in the large space at Broad Street Ministries. Now Inis Nua Theatre, the company that staged it, has reopened the production Off-Broadway, at the suite of theaters called 59E59. The setting by Meghan Jones has been scaled down to fit the New York space, and the six-member cast includes two new actors.
NEWS
March 5, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
DUBLIN - Somewhere in Ireland, a burglar has the heart of a saint. Officials at Christ Church Cathedral in Dublin said yesterday that they're distraught and perplexed over the theft of the church's most precious relic: the preserved heart of St. Laurence O'Toole, patron saint of Dublin. O'Toole's heart had been displayed in the cathedral since the 13th century. It was stored in a heart-shaped wooden box and secured in a small, square iron cage on the wall of a chapel dedicated to his memory.
NEWS
March 14, 1997 | By Jen Gomez, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Board of Commissioners unanimously approved Tuesday the appointment of Paul A. Leonard as township manager, officially bringing an end to Gregory Klemick's 12 years of service in that role. For the last year, Leonard has performed some of the manager's duties, serving as deputy township manager, a position created to ease the transition. Klemick resigned Jan. 1 because he has multiple sclerosis. "Greg was hardworking," board Chairman Richard R. Rulon said in an interview.
NEWS
October 9, 1995
With his broad smile, deep eyes and wild hair, does anyone look more the Irish poet than Seamus Heaney? With a poetry rooted in the history of his native land, with verse that rises and falls like the lush landscape, does anyone sound more the Irish poet than Seamus Heaney? And yet, as befits the latest recipient of the world's most prestigious literary award, Mr. Heaney's work transcends nationality and place to touch a universal longing. His poems "exalt everyday miracles and the living past," said the Swedish Academy as it awarded him the 1995 Nobel Prize for Literature last week.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2011 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
The Pride of Parnell Street at Act II Playhouse in Ambler is a love story. Like so many Irish plays, it's told in monologues, making it seem more like storytelling than like conventional, dialogic theater. Sebastian Barry's couple, Janet (Kittson O'Neill) and Joe (David Whalen), live a rough, tough, hardscrabble life, financed entirely by robbery, punctuated by violence. So it's surprising only to Janet when Joe beats her up after the Irish football team loses an important match.
NEWS
August 28, 2000 | by Paul Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
Frank Timoney wants to get a few things straight about his cousin, John, the Philadelphia police commissioner. First, his real name is Sean. "Over here, we call him by his Irish name," said Frank, a retired Dublin cop who spent 36 years on the force. Sean it is. As for this thing in Esquire magazine about John - er, Sean - being the best cop in the country? "Well, he's not the best cop in Ireland," Frank quipped. "The best cop in Ireland just retired. " This is going to be good.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
April 18, 2014 | By Tim McManus and Rick O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writers
Aside from a couple of games, the Plymouth Whitemarsh baseball team hasn't overwhelmed many teams with runs this season. The Colonials haven't had to. Mike Whalon threw his second consecutive shutout, and Plymouth Whitemarsh topped visiting Upper Dublin, 1-0, in Suburban One American play Wednesday. That has been the M.O. The Colonials, 5-0 in the league and 7-0 overall, have allowed 13 runs this season and five in their last four games. They have won three games by one run and two by two runs.
SPORTS
April 12, 2014 | By Rick O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dan Jacobson says the potential is there for Upper Dublin to duplicate or improve on its 2012 baseball success, when it went 18-7 and earned a berth in the PIAA Class AAAA state tournament. "I think we have what it takes," the senior righthander said. "We have hitting, pitching, solid fielding. We also have a winning attitude. " With Jacobson scattering three singles and fanning 11 in a complete game, the host Cardinals christened their newly renovated field by turning back Upper Moreland, 3-2, Thursday in a Suburban One League American Conference matchup.
NEWS
March 13, 2014 | By Carolyn Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Upper Dublin School District officials will not say whether vetting, as required by district policy, was done on a former adult-entertainment entrepreneur who twice was invited to give students advice for life. The speaker, meanwhile, said he sees no reason anyone should be upset with his background. "I personally don't see an issue in the whole thing," said Jason C. Jean, the 42-year-old motivational speaker and life coach, who lives in Dauphin County. "We didn't discuss those things.
NEWS
March 9, 2014 | By Carolyn Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
UPPER DUBLIN Many students at Upper Dublin High School were all a-Twitter on Thursday over "life coach" Jason C. Jean. It turned out that the sole speaker at a school assembly for seniors and juniors that day has a controversial other job. He organizes "adult events," according to state records. Principal Robert Schultz introduced Jean, who records show lives in Dauphin County, Pa., as someone who could give advice to help students succeed in life. But toward the end of the rambling 90-minute speech, students were so bewildered and bemused by what Jean, 42, was saying that they started researching him and tweeting their findings on their cellphones.
REAL_ESTATE
February 24, 2014 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
When Sally Mitlas was searching for a new home, the last place she expected to find one was around the corner, in a small community in Upper Dublin Township. But there it was, a house that seemed to beckon. "I've always really wanted a cabin in the woods," says Mitlas, owner of Mitlas Productions in Jenkintown. The bandleader, who spends many weekends providing the entertainment for weddings and bar and bat mitzvahs, was seeking a quiet retreat in her daily life. In 2006, she saw a property for sale and "figured I'd have a look.
NEWS
January 12, 2014 | By Kate Harman, For The Inquirer
Regan Gallagher knows which member of the Upper Dublin girls' basketball team stepped up her game the most after the program lost three starters from last season's extremely successful squad. Without a doubt, it was Kayla McAneney. The senior has been a force for the Cardinals this season, leading the team in points, averaging 18, and becoming a very reliable shooter in clutch situations. So when McAneney went down with a devastating knee injury in the first quarter of Friday night's 53-33 victory over Plymouth Whitemarsh in a Suburban One American game, the Cardinals were understandably shaken up. Instead of allowing the sight of their teammate writhing in pain on the court to get to them, the Cardinals (10-0 overall, 6-0 conference)
NEWS
December 16, 2013 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the days when Jack Yoast's front yard was a light-free zone, the Upper Dublin businessman would cruise the suburbs for holiday-decorating inspiration. Houses on Terwood Road in Willow Grove and nearby Joel Drive were the kind of shimmering spectacles that made his then-10-year-old daughter, Kelly, beam from the car. One day, Yoast thought, he'd have his own light show. Yoast, who co-owns a business telecommunications firm with brother Mike, has turned his front lawn into an incandescent corner of Upper Dublin Township where children and their parents stop to gaze at glowing depictions of Santas, penguins, fire-breathing dragons, and the baby Jesus.
NEWS
December 10, 2013 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
UPPER DUBLIN In 1912, Richard V. Mattison transformed his Upper Dublin mansion into a castle, befitting a man who could be called a baron of industry. Mattison, a pharmacist and founder of an Ambler company that was once a leading asbestos manufacturer, created what became a stone monument to the area's history and a backdrop in the 1966 movie The Trouble With Angels . But decades later, the majestic structure once known as Lindenwold Castle and its 45 acres of rustic surroundings are slated to be sold to developers who want to build more than 350 houses marketed primarily to seniors and empty-nesters.
NEWS
December 8, 2013 | By Rick O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marc Conran's goal is to play football in college, possibly at the Division III level. While he's sorting out his options in that sport, he handles the role of hardworking power forward on the hardwood. "He's got nonstop energy," Upper Dublin coach Josh Adelman said. "He flies around, dives for loose balls, does all the little things. He's that guy for this team. " Friday night, in the opening round of the fourth annual Upper Dublin Invitational Tournament, Conran produced 14 points and six rebounds as the Cardinals eased past cold-shooting North Penn, 59-39.
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