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NEWS
February 9, 1992 | By T.A. Frail, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
This is how the West won me: With nights so dark you could see the celestial dust glow like the gleam in God's eye. With terrain so various you could change climates on a dollar's worth of gas. With coveys of quail skittering across the desert floor, wearing their forelocks like Elvis impersonators. With bilingual pickup-truck ads on Navajo radio. With a hot tub to soothe my butt when I got off my horse. Well, it wasn't my horse; it was a rental. But that was the main reason my wife and I headed out to Arizona last March.
NEWS
August 4, 1996 | By Alfred Lubrano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
I should start with the truth. Yes, I fell off my horse on the dude-ranch trail. And no one at the Tumbling River Ranch would let me forget. They even hung a Native American nickname on me: "Falls With a Thud. " There's nothing worse than living up to low expectations. A city boy bouncing out of his saddle is actually a comforting sight for wilderness people, a reaffirmation of the stereotype that urbanites out in the woods are, well, out in the woods. To help matters, my brother, Chris, who traveled with us from New York, also fell off his horse during the same ride.
NEWS
August 7, 1988 | By Bill Shaw, Special to The Inquirer
It's Wednesday night, and the weekly rodeo is beginning at the Lazy AC Ranch in remote west central Montana. In Peoria or Anaheim the boys might play golf or tennis after work. In rural Montana there are no tennis courts or golf courses, and the nearest neighbor might be 60 miles away, so steer-roping is the social event. It's a tradition as old as the American West, a time to gather families, to discuss the hay crop, high school sports and sagging beef prices, and to curse the strange, threatening world of golf courses beyond the mountains.
NEWS
June 10, 1994 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
Unlike many other movies this year, "City Slickers II: The Legend Of Curly's Gold" isn't merely bad - it's morally disgusting. This sequel to the popular dude ranch comedy finds returning star Billy Crystal making a feverish grab for gold. This is also the movie's plot. Crystal repeats as New York radio man Mitch Robbins, heading west in "City Slickers II" to locate buried treasure, based on a map he finds in an old cowboy hat. That hat belonged to his dude ranch tutor Curly, played so winningly by Jack Palance in the original.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2013 | By Carolyn Hax
While I'm away, readers give the advice.     On fears of raising entitled children: Comment: Surely the parents (who wrote to you about this: http://wapo.st/Z3N4ve ) confuse cause and effect. Is their success not due to their educational achievements rather than the source of their tuition? I bet their parents didn't do their homework for them and try to get their teachers to give them unearned good grades so they could go to top universities.
NEWS
June 7, 1991 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
Whoa there, little doggies. If you thought "City Slickers" would end the summer comedy drought emergency, think again. It's not that "City Slickers" isn't funny - there are some laughs. It's just that it's not strictly a comedy. Instead of a western spoof, what you get is a fairly serious attempt to show how three men in the throes of midlife crises face their problems during a big cattle drive out in the prairie. There's some humor to lighten things up, but at its core, "City Slickers" is about male bonding, in the worst sense of the phrase.
NEWS
October 27, 1988 | By William Tuthill, Special to The Inquirer
A quick visit to the McDonald's in Strafford last week turned out to be the most expensive meal a Dutch visitor has had during her three-month stay in the United States. On Oct. 17, Nicolette Wester had more than $1,000 worth of property and cash stolen during a meal at the fast-food restaurant at 516 W. Lancaster Ave. Despite the experience, which occurred just before her return to the Netherlands, Wester said she harbored no bitter feelings toward the United States. "This doesn't change my impression of Philadelphia," Wester said in a telephone interview Tuesday.
NEWS
August 29, 1996 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A Funeral Mass will be said tomorrow for Charles J. Kaufmann Sr., 59, of Feasterville, owner of a commercial art firm, who died in a one-vehicle accident near Vail, Colo. The Mass will be said at 11 a.m. at the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary Roman Catholic Church, Meadowbrook and Bristol Roads. Friends and relatives may call there after 9:30 a.m. Mr. Kaufmann had been a passenger in a shuttle van owned by a dude ranch. A Colorado State Patrol representative said the van drifted off the side of a road about 6:15 p.m. Aug. 19 and rolled over several times as it went down an embankment to Piney River, 450 feet below.
NEWS
March 8, 2013
* OUR WILD HEARTS. 8 p.m. Saturday, Hallmark Movie Channel.   WHEN Ricky Schroder makes a movie for the whole family, he doesn't mess around. "Our Wild Hearts," a film about a rancher and the teenage daughter he never knew he had, comes to the Hallmark Movie Channel on Saturday with Schroder, his wife, Andrea, and each of the couple's four children represented. Their daughter Cambrie is making her movie debut as the Malibu-reared Willow, who decides to track down the man whom her mother (Angela Lindvall)
NEWS
September 17, 1989 | By CALVIN TRILLIN
It was my old Army buddy Charlie talking: "No wonder Princess Anne is getting rid of Capt. Mark Phillips. The guy never gets promoted. " "What are you talking about?" I said. "Well, when they got married, he was Capt. Mark Phillips, and now, 16 years later, he's still Capt. Mark Phillips. You'd think he'd be at least a major by now. He must be getting fitness reports that look like my junior high-school report cards. " "I don't think he's actually in the army anymore," I said.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2013 | By Carolyn Hax
While I'm away, readers give the advice.     On fears of raising entitled children: Comment: Surely the parents (who wrote to you about this: http://wapo.st/Z3N4ve ) confuse cause and effect. Is their success not due to their educational achievements rather than the source of their tuition? I bet their parents didn't do their homework for them and try to get their teachers to give them unearned good grades so they could go to top universities.
NEWS
March 8, 2013
* OUR WILD HEARTS. 8 p.m. Saturday, Hallmark Movie Channel.   WHEN Ricky Schroder makes a movie for the whole family, he doesn't mess around. "Our Wild Hearts," a film about a rancher and the teenage daughter he never knew he had, comes to the Hallmark Movie Channel on Saturday with Schroder, his wife, Andrea, and each of the couple's four children represented. Their daughter Cambrie is making her movie debut as the Malibu-reared Willow, who decides to track down the man whom her mother (Angela Lindvall)
NEWS
February 15, 2009 | By Norman Detweiler FOR THE INQUIRER
With as many close calls as I've had, I should have known that during the summer in a popular resort town you need a reservation to ensure a bed come nightfall. But as usual, I was winging it. So here I sat, in my truck on the far edge of Estes Park, Colo. - the gateway to Rocky Mountain National Park - wondering where I was going to spend the night. Every motel, resort, campground, dude ranch and bed-and-breakfast had a "no vacancy" sign at its entrance. And there were a lot of each in and around this town.
NEWS
August 29, 1996 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A Funeral Mass will be said tomorrow for Charles J. Kaufmann Sr., 59, of Feasterville, owner of a commercial art firm, who died in a one-vehicle accident near Vail, Colo. The Mass will be said at 11 a.m. at the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary Roman Catholic Church, Meadowbrook and Bristol Roads. Friends and relatives may call there after 9:30 a.m. Mr. Kaufmann had been a passenger in a shuttle van owned by a dude ranch. A Colorado State Patrol representative said the van drifted off the side of a road about 6:15 p.m. Aug. 19 and rolled over several times as it went down an embankment to Piney River, 450 feet below.
NEWS
August 4, 1996 | By Alfred Lubrano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
I should start with the truth. Yes, I fell off my horse on the dude-ranch trail. And no one at the Tumbling River Ranch would let me forget. They even hung a Native American nickname on me: "Falls With a Thud. " There's nothing worse than living up to low expectations. A city boy bouncing out of his saddle is actually a comforting sight for wilderness people, a reaffirmation of the stereotype that urbanites out in the woods are, well, out in the woods. To help matters, my brother, Chris, who traveled with us from New York, also fell off his horse during the same ride.
NEWS
May 6, 1996 | By Matthew Dolan, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Fly guys of yesteryear got quite a welcome after touching down onto Flying W airport's 3,500-foot-long airstrip. "They had half a dozen girls dressed in cowboy boots and hats on horseback," Ed Hoffmire recalled. "They would roll out a red carpet; they'd give you the greeting. " The 86-year-old Clifton pilot recalls first-class dinners in a converted barn with a runway view, and dips in the plane-shaped pool. Such was the 1960s heyday for the Flying W Ranch Airport, a rare South Jersey airport-cum-resort, before falling on hard times.
NEWS
October 15, 1995 | By Jennifer Wing, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
More than a decade ago, an 11-year-old Gladwyne boy persuaded his parents to drive him to Philadelphia so he could give blankets and pillows to the homeless. It wasn't long before Trevor Ferrell became internationally known. His work caught the eye of Mother Teresa in Calcutta and Ronald Reagan in Washington. Two television movies were made about him. Now 23, Ferrell is no longer a part of the million-dollar charity that carries his name, Trevor's Campaign. He lives in a modest rowhouse in Manayunk and manages a couple of thrift shops in Bryn Mawr and Philadelphia with his mother.
NEWS
June 10, 1994 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
Unlike many other movies this year, "City Slickers II: The Legend Of Curly's Gold" isn't merely bad - it's morally disgusting. This sequel to the popular dude ranch comedy finds returning star Billy Crystal making a feverish grab for gold. This is also the movie's plot. Crystal repeats as New York radio man Mitch Robbins, heading west in "City Slickers II" to locate buried treasure, based on a map he finds in an old cowboy hat. That hat belonged to his dude ranch tutor Curly, played so winningly by Jack Palance in the original.
LIVING
March 4, 1993 | By Michael Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"There's no excuse for the inane behavior on so many children's shows today. " This is Shari Lewis talking, or rather, this was Shari Lewis talking, back in 1959, when she was a 25-year-old kiddie-TV host ready to burst onto the national scene from her native New York. But this could be a 59-year-old Shari Lewis talking in 1993. "Inane is too benign a word. Insane is more like it," says Lewis, now older and wiser, but no less perky, from her home/office in Beverly Hills.
NEWS
February 9, 1992 | By T.A. Frail, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
This is how the West won me: With nights so dark you could see the celestial dust glow like the gleam in God's eye. With terrain so various you could change climates on a dollar's worth of gas. With coveys of quail skittering across the desert floor, wearing their forelocks like Elvis impersonators. With bilingual pickup-truck ads on Navajo radio. With a hot tub to soothe my butt when I got off my horse. Well, it wasn't my horse; it was a rental. But that was the main reason my wife and I headed out to Arizona last March.
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