CollectionsDuke University
IN THE NEWS

Duke University

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
November 8, 1994 | By Steve Wartenberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Duke University will be Payton's place for the next four years. Yesterday, Unionville's Payton Black, a 6-foot-4 center, announced she would sign with the Blue Devils when the early signing period begins tomorrow. Black led the Indians to last year's District 1 Class AAA girls' basketball title and was selected to Parade magazine's all-America second team. She picked Duke over Penn State, Virginia and Georgia Tech. "Duke had the best all-around blend of academics, athletics and social life for me," Black said.
NEWS
April 9, 2014
The event boasts a cornucopia (or is that pornucopia?) of sex-related seminars, product vendors and personal appearances by current and veteran adult-entertainment stars. Knox will be have a booth at Exxxotica where she'll sign autographs from 6 to 11 p.m. Friday and 3 to 9 p.m. Saturday. She'll also attend the Fanny Awards, where she's up for New Girl on The Block - Best Newcomer. (Cast your vote at thefannys.com.) Other event highlights: "Real Sex vs. Porn Sex": A seminar hosted by adult-film superstar Nina Hartley (6:30 p.m. Friday)
NEWS
December 7, 1995 | By Steve Wartenberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Take that. That's the thought that crossed Brad Scace's mind as the Upper Darby football standout accepted a football scholarship from Duke University earlier this week. "It seemed like when people were talking about all the top football recruits in the area - like Elmarko Jackson, Marty Brown and Chris Gicking, who's a good friend of mine - I was never mentioned," the 6-foot-3, 265-pound fullback/defensive lineman said. "That really motivated me. I wanted to be a big-time player, a Division I player.
NEWS
June 23, 2016 | By Joseph Jaafari, STAFF WRITER
A new college ranking has declared the University of Pennsylvania one of the top places in the United States to study computer science. The rankings by College Choice put Penn at No. 15 out of 50 schools nationwide for undergraduate degrees in computer science. Penn scored 88.35 on a scale of 0 to 100. The report lauded the university's Center for Human Modeling and Simulation - which animates human movement for medical research - as a top selling point, and said that students who graduate from Penn's program typically get entry-level jobs starting at $60,000.
NEWS
October 9, 2015 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kiersten Rickenbach stood out for both her long blond hair and sharp mind at Washington Township High School, where she often spoke of her plans to attend Duke University and become a pediatric oncologist. Nicknamed "Blonde" and "Barbie," she was voted "Most Studious" and "Most Likely to Succeed" by her classmates. In 1995, when she graduated, she was valedictorian. "With Kiersten, there wasn't a doubt in my mind that she was going to become a physician," said Karin Eckert-Carpenter, her guidance counselor, who helped her apply to Duke.
NEWS
January 31, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Richard B. Lieb, 67, of Valley Forge, director and former executive vice president of SEI Investments in Oaks, died in his sleep Monday, Jan. 25, in San Francisco, where he had been visiting his son. The cause of his death was not immediately known pending an investigation, the San Francisco Medical Examiner's office said. Mr. Lieb was born in Boston and grew up working in his family's delicatessen in Belmont, Mass. He received a bachelor's degree in history from Duke University, where he developed a lifelong passion for Duke basketball.
SPORTS
November 16, 2014 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Columnist
In strictly baseball terms, Scott Schoeneweis has traveled a long and winding road since leaving Lenape High School. But that's not the half of it. Schoeneweis will be inducted into the Hot Stovers Baseball Club of South Jersey Hall of Fame on Nov. 29 in well-deserved recognition of a pitching career marked by dominance in high school and at Duke University and a lengthy stay in the major leagues. "It will be a walk down memory lane," Schoeneweis, who lives in the Phoenix area, said of his return to South Jersey.
SPORTS
June 14, 2016 | By Keith Pompey, STAFF WRITER
Jahlil Okafor of the 76ers told a Duke University podcast Friday that he hoped to be cleared for basketball activity over the weekend. The 6-foot-11, 275-pounder out of Duke had surgery on March 22 to repair the meniscus in his right knee. The injury cost the NBA all-rookie selection the final 23 games of the season. A CAT scan on March 8 revealed the tear. "I'm getting anxious," Okafor said on the podcast hosted by Jon Scheyer, a Duke assistant coach. "I got in trouble a week and a half ago for going out there and shooting.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
TODAY WE LEAD with perhaps the greatest movie star of all-time, John Wayne , and his estate's ongoing battle with a prestigious ACC basketball power. Duke University was founded in 1838, but didn't actually become Duke until 1924, when James B. Duke gave the school a pile of money. Wayne was born in 1907 and was nicknamed "Duke" as a boy. Now, the Hollywood Reporter says John Wayne Enterprises is tired of Duke (the school) getting in the way of products profiting Duke (the nickname)
NEWS
March 26, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert P. Strauss, 82, a former Bryn Mawr resident and Pep Boys Auto Stores executive, died of causes related to aging Thursday, March 20, at his retirement home in Manalapan, Fla. Born in Philadelphia and raised in Merion, Mr. Strauss graduated from Episcopal Academy. A standout athlete, he led the school in varsity basketball and was chosen an All-Philadelphia player in 1948 and 1949. He went to Duke University on an athletic scholarship and was coached by the legendary Red Auerbach, who went on to fame as coach of the Boston Celtics.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 23, 2016 | By Joseph Jaafari, STAFF WRITER
A new college ranking has declared the University of Pennsylvania one of the top places in the United States to study computer science. The rankings by College Choice put Penn at No. 15 out of 50 schools nationwide for undergraduate degrees in computer science. Penn scored 88.35 on a scale of 0 to 100. The report lauded the university's Center for Human Modeling and Simulation - which animates human movement for medical research - as a top selling point, and said that students who graduate from Penn's program typically get entry-level jobs starting at $60,000.
SPORTS
June 14, 2016 | By Keith Pompey, STAFF WRITER
Jahlil Okafor of the 76ers told a Duke University podcast Friday that he hoped to be cleared for basketball activity over the weekend. The 6-foot-11, 275-pounder out of Duke had surgery on March 22 to repair the meniscus in his right knee. The injury cost the NBA all-rookie selection the final 23 games of the season. A CAT scan on March 8 revealed the tear. "I'm getting anxious," Okafor said on the podcast hosted by Jon Scheyer, a Duke assistant coach. "I got in trouble a week and a half ago for going out there and shooting.
SPORTS
March 26, 2016 | By Phil Anastasia, Staff Writer
Mike Vasturia was the rangy righthander. Billy Chillari was the athletic lefthander. That was true when Vasturia and Chillari became teammates as 10-year-old members of the South Jersey Young Guns travel squad. That remains true today, as Vasturia and Chillari prepare to begin their final season together as senior leaders for the St. Augustine Prep baseball team. "In school, on the field, we're basically best friends," Chillari said of his relationship with Vasturia. "We've been together so long.
NEWS
February 7, 2016 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Staff Writer
For William Earle Williams, it was just a gate, distinct from the imposing stone pillars that flank the other entryways to Haverford College, but still just a gate. The limestone columns, with attached benches, along Old Railroad Avenue were graceful, light, and simple. They invited passersby to sit, rather than simply walk through. For decades, Haverford students, staff, and visitors had no idea that the Edward B. Conklin Memorial gate was the work of one of the nation's most influential and underappreciated architectural designers.
NEWS
January 31, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Richard B. Lieb, 67, of Valley Forge, director and former executive vice president of SEI Investments in Oaks, died in his sleep Monday, Jan. 25, in San Francisco, where he had been visiting his son. The cause of his death was not immediately known pending an investigation, the San Francisco Medical Examiner's office said. Mr. Lieb was born in Boston and grew up working in his family's delicatessen in Belmont, Mass. He received a bachelor's degree in history from Duke University, where he developed a lifelong passion for Duke basketball.
NEWS
December 31, 2015
Robert Spitzer, 83, a psychiatrist who played a leading role in establishing agreed-upon standards to describe mental disorders and eliminating homosexuality's designation as a pathology, died of heart problems Friday in Seattle, said his wife, Janet Williams, a Columbia University professor emerita. Dr. Spitzer's work on several editions of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, or the D.S.M., defined all of the major disorders "so all in the profession could agree on what they were seeing," said Williams, who worked with him on D.S.M.-III, which was published in 1980.
NEWS
December 23, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Staff Writer
Carroll A. Weinberg, 87, a Wynnewood psychiatrist and human-rights expert, died Wednesday, Dec. 16, of cancer. Trained as a pediatrician, Dr. Weinberg spent the bulk of his career in psychiatry, working with children and adults, and teaching at Drexel University's College of Medicine. Locally, he practiced at the Philadelphia General Hospital and at Hahnemann University Hospital. Professionally, he explored the psychology of suicide terrorism, torture, and ethnic conflict; personally, he was deeply interested in civic affairs and the arts.
NEWS
October 9, 2015 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kiersten Rickenbach stood out for both her long blond hair and sharp mind at Washington Township High School, where she often spoke of her plans to attend Duke University and become a pediatric oncologist. Nicknamed "Blonde" and "Barbie," she was voted "Most Studious" and "Most Likely to Succeed" by her classmates. In 1995, when she graduated, she was valedictorian. "With Kiersten, there wasn't a doubt in my mind that she was going to become a physician," said Karin Eckert-Carpenter, her guidance counselor, who helped her apply to Duke.
NEWS
July 3, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
MARY MILUS YOH, matriarch of the family that owns Day & Zimmerman, the worldwide service company that is one of the Philadelphia area's major employers, died June 28 at the age of 78. She had been living in Key Largo, Fla., but had lived in Bryn Mawr most of her life. As the wife of Harold L. "Spike" Yoh Jr., retired chairman and chief executive of Day & Zimmerman, Mary was always an active participant in the company's activities as it grew from a local engineering firm to a diversified entity with projects all over the world.
NEWS
July 3, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mary Milus Yoh, 78, of Haverford and Key Largo, Fla., the matriarch of the Yoh family and an active volunteer and philanthropist in the Philadelphia region and in Florida, died Sunday, June 28, of congestive heart failure at her Key Largo home. Mrs. Yoh, whose father worked for the DuPont Co., grew up in Delaware and attended Duke University, where she met Harold L. "Spike" Yoh. The two married after she graduated in 1959, and started a family in California. They settled on the Main Line in 1963 to raise their five children.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|