CollectionsDumpster
IN THE NEWS

Dumpster

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 11, 1990 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
Judge Joseph DiPietro has closed the lid on the case of the uncovered dumpster involving the Springfield school board and the Springfield Township health officer. On Wednesday, the judge found the school board guilty of violating the township ordinance that requires all trash dumpsters to be covered, but he waived the fine of $125.50. "We are satisfied with the outcome," said John Bay, school district treasurer, who represented the district at the hearing. "It was obvious from photos (taken by the health officer)
NEWS
December 5, 1986 | By Maureen Graham, Special to The Inquirer
The remains of a newborn girl with the umbilical cord still attached were found yesterday in a dumpster behind a pizza parlor on the Black Horse Pike in Washington Township, Gloucester County, police said. The body was stuffed in a plastic trash bag and was lying at the top of the full dumpster. Police said the baby appeared to have been born within the previous 24 hours. Dr. Claus Speth, assistant state medical examiner, concluded that it had been a full-term live birth. Gloucester County Prosecutor Richard E. Hickey said late last night that the infant died of asphyxiation.
NEWS
October 25, 2009 | By Bill Green
This month, Philadelphia won an important battle in the war against trash. City Council, by an overwhelming majority, passed a bill that would change how the city licenses and regulates the thousands of Dumpsters scattered throughout Philadelphia. Dumpsters have become the odiferous scourge of our city's commercial corridors. They line our streets and alleys, taking up valuable public space. They are often overflowing, graffiti covered, and, in many cases, unlicensed or illegally placed.
NEWS
January 24, 1990 | By Donna St. George, Inquirer Staff Writer
Near an overturned dumpster, black plastic bags of trash are piling into a small mountain. They are half open, spilling over into a slick of yellow grease and a scattering of coffee cups, potato peelings, cardboard boxes and crumpled copies of Progressive Architecture. Evelyn Alloy, in her navy wool coat, red scarf and black pumps, is briskly walking south on 15th Street, a block from the posh quarters of the Union League and the Bellevue Stratford. She looks down on the tiny thoroughfare known as Moravian Street and spots the disheveled heap.
NEWS
February 15, 1990 | By Kerry Lippincott, Special to The Inquirer
It will be at least another year before West Caln Township changes to door- to-door trash collection. At its meeting Monday, the Board of Supervisors unanimously approved Charles Blosenski's bid for trash collection from a dumpster at the township's maintenance building on Schrack Creamery Road. The Honey Brook contractor, who has collected the township's trash for the last three years, will charge an average of $312.31 for each dumpster of trash. Under the new contract, residents will continue to bring trash to the site twice a week.
NEWS
December 9, 1993 | By Ziva Branstetter, Daily News Staff Writer
Mike celebrated his sixth birthday a little differently than most kids. Instead of cake and punch, he drank a few beers with his mom. "She had her friends over and all. It was my birthday party. She just put the can beside me and gave it to me . . . It felt good, real good. " After those first beers, Mike, now 19, went from cutting class and drinking quarts with his uncle to chugging whiskey and sleeping it off in a dumpster. By 16, he had graduated to marijuana and then a daily crack cocaine habit.
NEWS
May 12, 2010 | Inquirer Staff Report
Police are awaiting a post mortem examination to determine the cause of death of a man whose body was found in a Dumpster in West Philadelphia. The body of the unidentified man was discovered at 12:48 a.m. in the Dumpster behind a supermarket at 48th and Brown Streets in the Mill Creek neighborhood and taken to the Medical Examiner's Office in University City, police said. No other details are available.
NEWS
December 22, 1988 | By Joseph P. Blake, Daily News Staff Writer
An autopsy will be conducted by the medical examiner's office to determine the cause of death of a woman found yesterday inside a dumpster at the Whitehall Apartments housing project in Frankford. The woman, identified last night by relatives as Vivian Buxton, 29, of Briggs Street near Tackawanna, had no visible signs of injury, police said. She lived less than a mile from the project. "I recognize her, but I don't know her name," Tottie Daniels, a resident of the project, said a short time after the body was found.
NEWS
June 26, 1988 | By John Way Jennings, Inquirer Staff Writer
A New Castle County, Del., woman was charged with attempted first-degree murder after police said she put her newborn son into a dumpster Friday morning. Doris Jackson, 23, of the 300 block of Kemper Drive in the Brookmont Farms section near Newark, was listed in good condition at Christiana Hospital, where she was being held for observation. She was placed under police guard after she was arraigned at the hospital Friday night, and was ordered held on $100,000 bail. Her unnamed son was listed in fair condition yesterday at the hospital's intensive-care unit.
NEWS
August 20, 2009 | By CHRIS BRENNAN, brennac@phillynews.com 215-854-5973
City Councilman Bill Green didn't have to go far yesterday to make his point about unregulated dumpsters in Center City alleys. Green walked two blocks from City Hall to the 1600 block of Ionic Street, a narrow alley between Chestnut and Sansom streets lined with about 30 dumpsters. Not one, Green said, had a valid right-of-way permit needed to place a dumpster on a sidewalk. Some of the dumpsters were overflowing. Almost all of them were marked with graffiti. All could have been cited for fines.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 20, 2014 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
JOHN JUNIUS TAYLOR, a second-generation cabinetmaker and woodworker in Powelton Village, was walking down Hamilton Street near 35th two years ago, when he saw a beat-up Victorian door in a dumpster. "It needed some love," Taylor said dryly. And he suddenly needed a walnut-panel Victorian door. Last week, as a result of what he did with that door, Taylor won a 2014 Storefront Challenge Award from the Community Design Collaborative and the city's Commerce Department for "outstanding storefront facade improvements.
NEWS
August 3, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Staff Writer
Never put a gun on the stage, advised the Russian writer Anton Chekhov, unless you intend to have it go off during the play. He could have added: Never put a theater prop designed to look like a pipe bomb in a Dumpster - especially if it's near the controversial Goldtex apartments - unless you want to attract the full force of the city's Homeland Security unit. That was the lesson Bayla Rubin, of the Philadelphia theater troupe Applied Mechanics, learned Friday morning after a phalanx of police, firefighters, and ambulances descended on 12th and Wood Streets in response to a report of a bomb in a vacant lot across from Goldtex, scene of bitter months-long union protests in 2012.
NEWS
February 24, 2014 | BY MICHELE TRANQUILLI, Daily News Staff Writer tranqum@phillynews.com, 215-854-2348
YOU WANT THAT steak wit' or wit'out? If you're ordering at Geno's, you can now get them wit' - with the proper business and health licenses, that is. Seems that the famous cheesesteak palace at 9th Street and Passyunk Avenue had been operating with an expired food-prep license since May. Their private dumpster and sidewalk cafe licenses had been expired since 2011. After hearing from the Daily News , Geno's got the food-prep and sidewalk-cafe licenses renewed Thursday. Kylie Flett, a spokeswoman for Geno Vento, says the company learned of the expired licenses during their recent heath inspection.
NEWS
July 9, 2012 | Lalita Clozel is an intern with the Inquirer Editorial Board
On May 26, Ronald Poppo, a Miami man, was the victim of a gruesome attack that left him badly injured and disfigured. Poppo, 65, who has undergone several surgeries and is still hospitalized, had made his home in the stairwell of a parking lot near where the assault took place, vulnerable to the weather and to those who would harm him — or help him. Efforts to assist the homeless are often focused on pushing them off the street and into a...
BUSINESS
June 16, 2012 | Al Heavens
"What a dump!" If Bette Davis' perpetually parodied line from Beyond the Forest (1949) describes any room in your house, you know you have a problem. With clutter, of course. No matter how much storage a house has, the supply of stuff always seems to exceed demand by at least two bays of a one-car garage. We buy new without tossing old. When we do try to cull, we often find that no one wants the old stuff, except, perhaps, for the scavengers who troll the streets the night before trash collection to cart off perceived treasures.
NEWS
April 25, 2012 | By Juliana Reyes
Every Tuesday Leah Howse got a 4:30 a.m. wake-up call. Free of charge, courtesy of the trash haulers right outside her bedroom. Since December, when someone moved a Dumpster to the alley behind her house, the noisy haulers consistently provided an unwanted alarm. Howse, who lives in Francisville, says the combination of the beeping truck, the banging to make sure the Dumpster's empty, and the workers yelling to each other ensures that her day starts early. "It's relatively quick," she says, "but then I'm awake.
NEWS
September 11, 2011 | By Maria L. La Ganga, Los Angeles Times
SAN FRANCISCO - The greatest park in San Francisco arguably is Golden Gate - 1,017 sweeping acres studded with playgrounds and windmills, lakes and museums, a Shakespeare garden, a brew pub, and its own herd of bison. No one could argue that the latest green spaces to grace the city are a far more modest proposal. The two bright-red Dumpsters, 16 feet long by nearly 6 feet wide and filled with greenery, have been placed in a busy downtown neighborhood where they provide a little shade, elicit regular double-takes, and fill curbside spots that otherwise would go to cars.
NEWS
September 9, 2011 | By James Osborne, Inquirer Staff Writer
The mystery of the floating doughnuts has been solved. Over the last two years, thousands of doughnuts, bagels, and other baked goods have turned up in Newton Lake Park in Collingswood, strewed across the fishing dock and floating in the water. No discernible origin, no suspects - until Thursday. Around 6:15 a.m., park police caught an employee from a nearby Dunkin' Donuts store with three trash bags full of old doughnuts - as well as hair nets and other trash. The man, Santosh Dey of Oaklyn, told police he wanted to feed the geese that make the park their home.
NEWS
September 6, 2011 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Neil Benson and his merry band of mavericks made art - and headlines - from the stuff other people threw away in the early 1990s. These self-proclaimed "Dumpster Divers of Philadelphia" collected, curated, and transformed treasures they rescued from trash containers and sidewalks into something wonderful. But Benson's commitment to what he calls "free art supplies" became more consuming after he retired from freelance photography a decade ago. As the contents in his network of informal storage spaces seemed to metastasize, his deepening devotion threatened to bury him. Enter another merry band: a new one composed of young artists, old friends, and neighbors.
NEWS
August 28, 2011 | By Larry King, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After an all-day search, police in Bucks County this afternoon found the body of a U.S. Army captain suspected of murdering four people - three in Virginia, one in Buckingham Township - and wounding two police officers during a late-night shootout in Doylestown. Leonard John Egland, 37, of Fort Lee, Va., was found dead in the brush of a vacant lot near York and Almshouse Roads in Warwick Township at around 3:40 p.m., District Attorney David W. Heckler said. Authorities believe he died from a self-inflicted gunshot.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|