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BUSINESS
May 20, 1989 | By Richard Burke, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia company yesterday accused Dun & Bradstreet Inc. of using a "nationwide pattern of fraud" to dupe customers into buying more credit information than they needed. Frank Sussman Co., a wholesale clothing distributor in Old City, charged that Dun & Bradstreet, a New York financial-information services company, "taught" its salesmen how to mislead customers and that it fired those who refused to participate in the alleged scheme. The allegations were contained in a lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
August 11, 1992 | By Jeff Brown, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If dismal statistics on unemployment, housing starts or business failures aren't enough to get you down, here's a new figure to add to your personal misery index: business payment performance. Dun & Bradstreet Information Services, a Murray Hill, N.J., marketer of business information, yesterday updated a gauge of the U.S. economy measuring how many companies are late paying their bills. The worst findings came from Pennsylvania, New Jersey and New York. "The current picture is, quite frankly, a little bit bleak," said David T. Kresge, the vice president who runs Dun & Bradstreet's analytical operations.
BUSINESS
January 7, 1997 | By Andrew Cassel, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pennsylvania suffered the fifth-largest loss of jobs and businesses of any state in the nation during the first half of this decade, according to a study released yesterday by Dun & Bradstreet. New Jersey and Delaware, however, were among the national leaders in attracting business from other states, the survey indicates. A net total of 510 businesses left Pennsylvania from 1991 through 1995, Dun & Bradstreet said. Those firms took with them a net total of 6,568 jobs, the survey said.
BUSINESS
May 3, 1989 | By Terry Bivens, Inquirer Staff Writer
Action Manufacturing Co., the Philadelphia maker of ordnance for the Army, has ceased production, laying off as many as 500 people. Employees were told of the shutdown last Wednesday. On Friday, they were mailed letters informing them that the company had run out of operating capital. A separate letter advised workers that health-insurance coverage was canceled as of April 28. "We are very sorry these steps are necessary," the letter said, "and we can assure you that we are continuing our attempts to raise the money necessary to resume our business.
NEWS
February 28, 1996 | By Bill Price, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Edwin F. Gallagher, 85, of Glenolden, a retired credit investigator for Dun & Bradstreet in Philadelphia, died of emphysema Saturday at Integrated Health Services in Broomall. He had worked for Dun & Bradstreet for 31 years, retiring in 1975. Mr. Gallagher, a native of Philadelphia, graduated from West Catholic High School and from Catholic University in Washington in 1933 with a degree in theology. He continued his religious training toward the priesthood and completed eight years at the Catholic Order of Josephites in Baltimore, becoming a deacon.
BUSINESS
August 31, 1987 | By Andrew Cassel, Inquirer Staff Writer
How healthy is Philadelphia? The announcement that Cigna is considering moving its 4,400 workers from Center City to the suburbs has raised anew the question of whether the city's economic base, particularly in the dense Center City office district, is declining. The answer, although hard to pin down definitively, appears to be no. While the city's cup is hardly running over, it is being filled - for now. Although people and jobs are continuing to flow out toward the suburbs, the city's economy is generating more than it is losing.
NEWS
June 14, 1995 | By Wes Conard, Laura Genao and Karen E. Quinones Miller, FOR THE INQUIRER
The IRS has been called in to investigate the source of the $1.5 million in cash that was found at the scene of the husband-and-wife double homicide last week, according to police. Police believe that John Ko, 40, and Janet Ko, 53, shot each other with the same pistol during a domestic argument Friday. The money is not believed to be linked to shootings or to organized crime, said Lt. John J. Bennett of the police department. Police often work from the assumption that a person with that much cash in the home might be involved in some sort of illegal activity, such as drug dealing.
BUSINESS
November 20, 1988 | By Valerie Reitman, Inquirer Staff Writer
About this time each month, the world's largest drug companies start getting antsy. That's when they get their report cards. They find out how many pills they've sold and whether they've thwarted the competition. "Everybody gets excited when the RX (prescription) and dollar data come up," says Kathy Emerick, senior marketing information analyst at Rorer Group Inc. in Fort Washington. Obtaining this scorecard - virtually required reading in the pharmaceutical business - costs most companies well over a million dollars apiece each year.
BUSINESS
December 5, 2012 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
At least one CEO says American companies ought to help workers save for college for their children before boosting their retirement plans. Dun & Bradstreet Credibility Corp. (DBCC), an aggressive California-based firm that does credit ratings on small businesses (they'll "monitor and control" your loan records, for monthly fees of $69 to $149), is one of the first firms to implement a new federally authorized, partly employer-funded college savings plan for its 600 workers - plus a few sweeteners.
BUSINESS
November 20, 1991 | the Inquirer staff
EXECUTIVES PESSIMISTIC U.S. business executives have grown more pessimistic about fourth-quarter sales and profits, while their counterparts overseas have become a bit more bullish, according to a survey of 11,000 executives released yesterday. Dun & Bradstreet said its worldwide index of business confidence rose to 31 in the fourth quarter, from 30 in the third quarter. The index was at 36 a year ago. But U.S. executives' optimism fell from 48 to 46. Joseph Duncan, a Dun & Bradstreet vice president, said that "American business is still not convinced" the recession was over.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
December 5, 2012 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
At least one CEO says American companies ought to help workers save for college for their children before boosting their retirement plans. Dun & Bradstreet Credibility Corp. (DBCC), an aggressive California-based firm that does credit ratings on small businesses (they'll "monitor and control" your loan records, for monthly fees of $69 to $149), is one of the first firms to implement a new federally authorized, partly employer-funded college savings plan for its 600 workers - plus a few sweeteners.
NEWS
October 22, 2011
Burn in hell, Gadhafi I knew a young man named Nicholas Bright. He was extremely sharp, good-looking, well-mannered, and very likable. He worked for a management consulting firm that was hired by our mother company, Dun & Bradstreet, to assist upper management at R.H. Donnelley Corp. It wasn't easy for someone that young to have to tell senior executives what they needed to change. Yet Nicholas was capable and successful in doing it, and he did it with style. One afternoon I walked into a colleague's office.
BUSINESS
February 3, 1997 | By Tom Belden, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ready for a quiz this morning? In which Latin American countries is it a bad idea to wear elegant and expensive jewelry during a business appointment? The answer: Most nations south of the Rio Grande, perhaps with the exception of Brazil, Costa Rica and Venezuela. In Chile, in particular, it seems that wearing virtually any jewelry is considered in poor taste and can be viewed as proof that Americans are in business only to amass personal wealth. That bit of cultural information - the kind of vital tip on a potential faux pas that could ruin a business deal before it gets started - is contained in a new guide that business travelers may find useful.
BUSINESS
January 7, 1997 | By Andrew Cassel, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pennsylvania suffered the fifth-largest loss of jobs and businesses of any state in the nation during the first half of this decade, according to a study released yesterday by Dun & Bradstreet. New Jersey and Delaware, however, were among the national leaders in attracting business from other states, the survey indicates. A net total of 510 businesses left Pennsylvania from 1991 through 1995, Dun & Bradstreet said. Those firms took with them a net total of 6,568 jobs, the survey said.
NEWS
February 28, 1996 | By Bill Price, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Edwin F. Gallagher, 85, of Glenolden, a retired credit investigator for Dun & Bradstreet in Philadelphia, died of emphysema Saturday at Integrated Health Services in Broomall. He had worked for Dun & Bradstreet for 31 years, retiring in 1975. Mr. Gallagher, a native of Philadelphia, graduated from West Catholic High School and from Catholic University in Washington in 1933 with a degree in theology. He continued his religious training toward the priesthood and completed eight years at the Catholic Order of Josephites in Baltimore, becoming a deacon.
NEWS
June 14, 1995 | By Wes Conard, Laura Genao and Karen E. Quinones Miller, FOR THE INQUIRER
The IRS has been called in to investigate the source of the $1.5 million in cash that was found at the scene of the husband-and-wife double homicide last week, according to police. Police believe that John Ko, 40, and Janet Ko, 53, shot each other with the same pistol during a domestic argument Friday. The money is not believed to be linked to shootings or to organized crime, said Lt. John J. Bennett of the police department. Police often work from the assumption that a person with that much cash in the home might be involved in some sort of illegal activity, such as drug dealing.
BUSINESS
August 11, 1992 | By Jeff Brown, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If dismal statistics on unemployment, housing starts or business failures aren't enough to get you down, here's a new figure to add to your personal misery index: business payment performance. Dun & Bradstreet Information Services, a Murray Hill, N.J., marketer of business information, yesterday updated a gauge of the U.S. economy measuring how many companies are late paying their bills. The worst findings came from Pennsylvania, New Jersey and New York. "The current picture is, quite frankly, a little bit bleak," said David T. Kresge, the vice president who runs Dun & Bradstreet's analytical operations.
NEWS
January 4, 1992 | By Larry Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Alistair Cooke, the courtly English commentator who has been Britain's eyes on America for half a century, came back to London for a visit over the holidays. The experience did not fill him with good cheer. He had been hoping, he told his radio listeners the other day, to escape the sense of gloom and doom that pervades the United States. But in Britain, he found the economic news to be every bit as depressing, an endless litany of statistics and reports about lost jobs, lost homes and lost hopes.
BUSINESS
November 20, 1991 | the Inquirer staff
EXECUTIVES PESSIMISTIC U.S. business executives have grown more pessimistic about fourth-quarter sales and profits, while their counterparts overseas have become a bit more bullish, according to a survey of 11,000 executives released yesterday. Dun & Bradstreet said its worldwide index of business confidence rose to 31 in the fourth quarter, from 30 in the third quarter. The index was at 36 a year ago. But U.S. executives' optimism fell from 48 to 46. Joseph Duncan, a Dun & Bradstreet vice president, said that "American business is still not convinced" the recession was over.
BUSINESS
August 21, 1991 | By Tawn Nhan, Inquirer Staff Writer
The opening of a Dun & Bradstreet Information Services office next week in Bethlehem, Pa., will bring about 1,000 employees to the area, company officials said yesterday. Information Services, based in Murray Hill, N.J., is one of the largest units of Dun & Bradstreet Corp. in New York, which provides credit reports and rankings of numerous companies. The 150-year-old Information Services unit gathers credit information on more than 9.5 million U.S. and more than 7 million foreign businesses for the corporation's 125,000 clients.
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