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NEWS
November 10, 2006 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
George Edward Preston, 92, who survived the Holocaust and afterward came to America, where he thrived, died of multiple organ failure Wednesday at home. He lived in Hyde Park near Wilmington. In 1985, Mr. Preston and his son, David Lee Preston, who was an Inquirer staff writer at the time, took a monthlong trip to France, the Soviet Union, Poland and Germany to revisit his past. The younger Preston wrote an article for Inquirer Magazine that chronicled the trip. The article was a finalist for the 1986 Pulitzer Prize in feature writing.
NEWS
December 10, 2010 | By WILL BUNCH, bunchw@phillynews.com 215-854-2957
He was the multimillionaire heir to one of the most fabluous estates in the Philadelphia region - the roughly 600 acres of rolling hills and horse stables near Newtown Square known as Foxcatcher Farm, anchored by a stately Georgian-style mansion called Liseter Hall. But in the end, the chemical-fortune scion John Eleuthere duPont died all alone, apparently of natural causes, in a western Pennsylvania prison cell where his frail and lifeless body was found at 6:55 a.m. yesterday. He was 72. DuPont's millions were powerless against the psychological demons that caused his slide into insanity - which led him to reportedly declare himself the red-robed "Dalai Lama of the United States" and finally to gun down a gold-medal-winning Olympic wrestler for no apparent reason.
SPORTS
April 7, 1992 | By Mayer Brandschain, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
The Conestoga Country Club team of Drew Hood and John Cooper won the two- man scramble tournament of the Philadelphia PGA on the Nemours Course of the DuPont Country Club yesterday with a 9-under-par score of 60. The event, which opened the association's 1992 schedule, was played on the Nemours Course and on the DuPont Course. The winning team on the DuPont Course was Rick Osberg of Waynesborough Country Club and Jim Bromley of Whitemarsh Valley Country Club, who shot a 7- under-par 63.
BUSINESS
May 6, 1993 | By Donna Shaw, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
DuPont Co. said yesterday that it was restructuring its chemical and specialties operations, a move it said would eliminate an unknown number of jobs. Chairman and chief executive Edgar S. Woolard Jr. said the moves at the Wilmington company would reorganize six business sectors "to have only one layer between strategic business units" and his office. In a news release, he said that for most employees, there would be little effect but that "excess positions" would result. There is no way to determine how many jobs would be affected until each business has assessed its needs, he said.
NEWS
July 8, 1988
They ought to rename the A.I. duPont Institute in Wilmington. You may have read about the place. It's the 97-bed pediatric hospital that's going to turn away youngsters who test positive for AIDS. They ought to rename it: the A.I. duPont Institute for Kids Who Aren't Too Sick. That's the message the hospital's overseers at the Nemours Foundation in Jacksonville, Fla., inscribed over its portals with a no-kids-with-AIDS policy that began July 1. It's a first for a hospital in this country.
NEWS
January 31, 1996 | By Mark Jaffe and Richard Jones, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
John Osterlund, 86, a retired DuPont Co. executive and father of U.S. District Judge Marjorie O. Rendell, died Monday at Forsyth Memorial Hospital, in Winston-Salem, N.C. Mr. Osterlund was born in Philadelphia and was a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania Law School and the university's Wharton School. He joined DuPont in 1936 and eventually became assistant to the secretary of the company. He retired in 1974. His daughter Marjorie (known as Midge) is the wife of Mayor Rendell.
SPORTS
July 9, 1986 | By MIKE KERN, Daily News Sports Writer
Just because the prestigious McDonald's Championship has moved from White Manor Country Club, in Malvern, to DuPont Country Club, LPGA commissioner John Laupheimer, a native of Philadelphia, does not believe the Southeastern Pennsylvania area has to feel a sense of loss. "We're still here," said Laupheimer, who was at DuPont yesterday to help formally introduce the event's new home for the next three years. "We'd like to think of this as a tournament for metropolitan Philadelphia, as well as the Wilmington area.
SPORTS
January 9, 1991 | By Diane Pucin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The basketball game between Villanova and Connecticut, a sweaty, sticky defensive battle touched by wild momentum swings, finally came down to a one- on-one battle between two fine athletes. With the Huskies up, 73-71, Lance Miller, Villanova's slashing forward, spotted an open path to the baseline. His eyes widened; he dribbled and took his long, smooth step. Lyman DePriest, Connecticut's defensive specialist, moved, too. Miller reached the hoop and rose, confident of a game-tying layup.
NEWS
April 15, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
WILMINGTON - DuPont Co. has received the final regulatory approval needed for its planned $5.8 billion acquisition of Danish food additives maker Danisco AS. DuPont said Friday that Chinese regulators have approved the deal, and that it is encouraging Danisco shareholders who have not yet tendered their shares to do so. DuPont has said it is confident that Danisco shareholders will follow their board's recommendation to accept DuPont's cash offer,...
NEWS
July 25, 2011
DuPont Co. said today it bought Innovalight Inc., a Sunnyvale, Calif., company founded in 2005 that makes silicon inks and other materials designed to improve the efficiency of crystalline silicon solar cells. Terms of the deal were not disclosed. With revenue of more than $1 billion from photovoltaic market last year, DuPont, of Wilmington, said its goal was to reach $2 billion in such sales by 2014. Privately held Innovalight said in May it would receive $3.4 million from the U.S. Department of Energy to accelerate the development and production of the company's products.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
June 23, 2015
Stephen Permut , chair of the department of family and community medicine at Temple University School of Medicine, has been elected to serve as chair of the board of trustees of the American Medical Association , the nation's largest physician organization. Lisa Leonard will assume the office of president of the Rotary Club of Philadelphia on July 1. She is the owner and operator of VoiceWorks. The Free Library of Philadelphia Foundation has appointed Benito Cachinero-Sánchez to its board of directors.
BUSINESS
May 16, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Better training might have prevented the deaths of four workers killed by lethal gas November 15 at DuPont's facility in LaPorte, Texas, the U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Health and Safety Adminstration said Thursday. OSHA fined the company $99,000 for 10 violations, including one for insufficient training. The incident began when one worker opened a drain on a methyl mercaptan vent line and was overcome. Three people who tried to help also died. None had respirators.
BUSINESS
May 15, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Big stock-index funds and small investors joined forces to reelect incumbent DuPont Co. directors in a Wednesday vote at the company's Wilmington headquarters, pushing back a rival slate led by billionaire activist investor Nelson Peltz. After the vote, Peltz said that "the vast majority" of actively managed mutual funds and hedge funds had backed his slate. Vote totals were not released. "We won," company chair and chief executive Ellen Kullman crowed. "Apparently, we got their attention," she said, referring to the company's $15 million campaign to win support from retirees and other small investors, who own nearly one-third of DuPont's 900 million shares outstanding and had not voted much in recent elections.
BUSINESS
May 11, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Phone banks, slick pamphlets, attack ads, and daily mailings: This year's vote to pick directors for the DuPont Co . on May 13 looks more like the Philadelphia mayor's race than the usual corporate coronation. DuPont's stockholders - nearly 2,000 mutual funds and other institutions along with 600,000 individual investors - are hearing from two parties, one led by DuPont's chief executive in Wilmington, Ellen Kullman, the other by billionaire Nelson Peltz and his firm, Trian Fund Management.
BUSINESS
April 29, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Shares of DuPont Co. rose 4.6 percent on Monday - topping the Dow Jones industrial average and landing at No. 2 on the S&P 500 - as traders applauded the decision by Institutional Shareholder Services (ISS), a Maryland-based advisory firm, to back billionaire activist Nelson Peltz's antimanagement campaign to join the Wilmington industrial giant's board. "The dissidents are onto something in their critique," ISS said in a report questioning DuPont's sales and profits record.
BUSINESS
March 16, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Always, after past recessions, Hollis Thomases managed to resurrect her marketing business, but this time, she just didn't have the energy "to get back on the horse. " And truthfully, that stallion had turned into a nag, and not much fun to ride. So, instead, Thomases, 50, decided to reinvent herself - as a reinvention specialist, launching a business to work with people who want to change their lives or already have. "I've reinvented myself more than once," Thomases said.
BUSINESS
February 13, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Billionaire investor Nelson Peltz's Trian Group is pressing his campaign to squeeze cash out of the DuPont Co. even faster by making good on his threat to run with three allies against board of directors candidates backed by DuPont chairman and chief executive Ellen Kullman. Bondholders worry that Kullman has already given Peltz more money than is good for them. Peltz's firm Wednesday praised DuPont's nomination of turnaround specialists Edward Breen (ex-boss of Tyco International )
BUSINESS
January 12, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's getting personal. Billionaire investor Nelson Peltz accelerated his two-year campaign to break up the DuPont Co. last week by naming himself and three allies to run against CEO and chair Ellen Kullman and her backers, when shareholders vote in April. Peltz wants more, deeper, and faster management cuts, a breakup of DuPont into smaller chunks he thinks will make faster profits for shareholders, and closer scrutiny of research and development spending. The Kullman board shot back with an existential defense of the 200-year-old, Wilmington-based global manufacturer.
BUSINESS
January 11, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
BALLY, Pa. - The path to Mars goes through this small Berks County town that has long been a hub for textile manufacturing in the region stretching from Allentown to Reading. So said NASA Administrator Charles Bolden during a visit Friday to Bally Ribbon Mills, a family-owned business founded in 1923 to weave hat bands out of silk. Bally Ribbon, with the fourth generation in the business, still has shuttle-loom frames from that era. Those looms now make ribbons for military medals.
NEWS
December 24, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The long retreat of the DuPont Co. from the city it long personified took a giant leap Monday when the chemical-maker announced it would move about 1,000 employees, including its chief executive officer, from the center of troubled Wilmington to a suburban office park. DuPont said Monday it will consolidate its headquarters. Between 800 and 1,000 supervisors and staff will leave the high-rise complex that has loomed over the city's focal Rodney Square Park since Pierre S. du Pont created the modern company in the early 1900s.
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