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NEWS
November 10, 2006 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
George Edward Preston, 92, who survived the Holocaust and afterward came to America, where he thrived, died of multiple organ failure Wednesday at home. He lived in Hyde Park near Wilmington. In 1985, Mr. Preston and his son, David Lee Preston, who was an Inquirer staff writer at the time, took a monthlong trip to France, the Soviet Union, Poland and Germany to revisit his past. The younger Preston wrote an article for Inquirer Magazine that chronicled the trip. The article was a finalist for the 1986 Pulitzer Prize in feature writing.
NEWS
August 15, 2016 | By Kathy Boccella, Staff Writer
At the moment, the only sound in Patrice Banks' auto repair shop in Upper Darby is the click of her trademark strappy red heels across the floor. Soon, though, if her plan pans out, the place will resound with revving engines, lug-nut guns, and blow dryers, while in the air the scents of 10W-30 motor oil and fresh nail polish commingle. Garages, almost always, are shrines to the Y chromosome. But Banks' vision for the Girls Auto Clinic and So Clutch Beauty Bar is XX: car care for women, by women.
SPORTS
April 7, 1992 | By Mayer Brandschain, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
The Conestoga Country Club team of Drew Hood and John Cooper won the two- man scramble tournament of the Philadelphia PGA on the Nemours Course of the DuPont Country Club yesterday with a 9-under-par score of 60. The event, which opened the association's 1992 schedule, was played on the Nemours Course and on the DuPont Course. The winning team on the DuPont Course was Rick Osberg of Waynesborough Country Club and Jim Bromley of Whitemarsh Valley Country Club, who shot a 7- under-par 63.
BUSINESS
May 6, 1993 | By Donna Shaw, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
DuPont Co. said yesterday that it was restructuring its chemical and specialties operations, a move it said would eliminate an unknown number of jobs. Chairman and chief executive Edgar S. Woolard Jr. said the moves at the Wilmington company would reorganize six business sectors "to have only one layer between strategic business units" and his office. In a news release, he said that for most employees, there would be little effect but that "excess positions" would result. There is no way to determine how many jobs would be affected until each business has assessed its needs, he said.
NEWS
July 8, 1988
They ought to rename the A.I. duPont Institute in Wilmington. You may have read about the place. It's the 97-bed pediatric hospital that's going to turn away youngsters who test positive for AIDS. They ought to rename it: the A.I. duPont Institute for Kids Who Aren't Too Sick. That's the message the hospital's overseers at the Nemours Foundation in Jacksonville, Fla., inscribed over its portals with a no-kids-with-AIDS policy that began July 1. It's a first for a hospital in this country.
NEWS
January 31, 1996 | By Mark Jaffe and Richard Jones, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
John Osterlund, 86, a retired DuPont Co. executive and father of U.S. District Judge Marjorie O. Rendell, died Monday at Forsyth Memorial Hospital, in Winston-Salem, N.C. Mr. Osterlund was born in Philadelphia and was a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania Law School and the university's Wharton School. He joined DuPont in 1936 and eventually became assistant to the secretary of the company. He retired in 1974. His daughter Marjorie (known as Midge) is the wife of Mayor Rendell.
NEWS
December 10, 2010 | By WILL BUNCH, bunchw@phillynews.com 215-854-2957
He was the multimillionaire heir to one of the most fabluous estates in the Philadelphia region - the roughly 600 acres of rolling hills and horse stables near Newtown Square known as Foxcatcher Farm, anchored by a stately Georgian-style mansion called Liseter Hall. But in the end, the chemical-fortune scion John Eleuthere duPont died all alone, apparently of natural causes, in a western Pennsylvania prison cell where his frail and lifeless body was found at 6:55 a.m. yesterday. He was 72. DuPont's millions were powerless against the psychological demons that caused his slide into insanity - which led him to reportedly declare himself the red-robed "Dalai Lama of the United States" and finally to gun down a gold-medal-winning Olympic wrestler for no apparent reason.
SPORTS
July 9, 1986 | By MIKE KERN, Daily News Sports Writer
Just because the prestigious McDonald's Championship has moved from White Manor Country Club, in Malvern, to DuPont Country Club, LPGA commissioner John Laupheimer, a native of Philadelphia, does not believe the Southeastern Pennsylvania area has to feel a sense of loss. "We're still here," said Laupheimer, who was at DuPont yesterday to help formally introduce the event's new home for the next three years. "We'd like to think of this as a tournament for metropolitan Philadelphia, as well as the Wilmington area.
SPORTS
January 9, 1991 | By Diane Pucin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The basketball game between Villanova and Connecticut, a sweaty, sticky defensive battle touched by wild momentum swings, finally came down to a one- on-one battle between two fine athletes. With the Huskies up, 73-71, Lance Miller, Villanova's slashing forward, spotted an open path to the baseline. His eyes widened; he dribbled and took his long, smooth step. Lyman DePriest, Connecticut's defensive specialist, moved, too. Miller reached the hoop and rose, confident of a game-tying layup.
NEWS
April 15, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
WILMINGTON - DuPont Co. has received the final regulatory approval needed for its planned $5.8 billion acquisition of Danish food additives maker Danisco AS. DuPont said Friday that Chinese regulators have approved the deal, and that it is encouraging Danisco shareholders who have not yet tendered their shares to do so. DuPont has said it is confident that Danisco shareholders will follow their board's recommendation to accept DuPont's cash offer,...
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 15, 2016 | By Kathy Boccella, Staff Writer
At the moment, the only sound in Patrice Banks' auto repair shop in Upper Darby is the click of her trademark strappy red heels across the floor. Soon, though, if her plan pans out, the place will resound with revving engines, lug-nut guns, and blow dryers, while in the air the scents of 10W-30 motor oil and fresh nail polish commingle. Garages, almost always, are shrines to the Y chromosome. But Banks' vision for the Girls Auto Clinic and So Clutch Beauty Bar is XX: car care for women, by women.
BUSINESS
August 4, 2016 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Staff Writer
Chemours , the chemical maker spun off by DuPont last year with some of that company's dirtiest industrial plants, has decided to stay put in Wilmington. CEO Mark Vergnano cited the corporate-tax reductions passed by the Democratic legislature and signed by Gov. Jack Markell in the "Delaware Competes Act" as a reason not to move to New Jersey or Pennsylvania. "This legislation isn't about Chemours specifically," Markell spokeswoman Courtney McGregor told me. As DuPont fragments, the state has stepped up efforts to keep not just Chemours but also two other planned DuPont successor companies from fleeing, the way paint-making spin-off Axalta moved its headquarters to Philadelphia two years ago. Delaware used to tax business operations: The more you had, the more you paid.
REAL_ESTATE
July 17, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, Staff Writer
The first real estate piece I wrote for the Inquirer, back in March 1989, was on how to determine your house's age. That was nearly 5,000 articles ago, and it applied specifically to Philadelphia and the older suburbs, but it was inspired by what I went through to determine when and by whom my first two city houses were built. Every old building has a story, though it often isn't until that building is repurposed that you hear it. In April, I wrote about MM Partners' $12 million redo: the A.F. Bornot Lofts at 17th Street and Fairmount Avenue, a mixed-use project with 17 loft-style rental apartments, two for-sale townhouses, underground parking, and five businesses comprising 15,000 square feet.
NEWS
April 22, 2016 | By Tia Yang, Staff Writer
Robert L. Frank, 90, a former financial analyst, died Monday, April 18, of pneumonia at Harlee Manor Nursing Facility in Springfield, Delaware County, where he had resided for 31/2 years. The third of eight children, Mr. Frank was a dedicated member of the Springfield Township community, where he grew up, delivered newspapers, and served as an altar boy at St. Francis of Assisi parish. He was a Boy Scout - certified as an Eagle Scout in 1943 - and remained active in scouting throughout most of his life.
BUSINESS
March 29, 2016 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Staff Writer
DuPont Co. collected $2.5 billion in after-tax profits last year. Dow Chemical Co. collected $4 billion. They aren't guaranteeing how many of the 5,000 or so people they still employ in Delaware will still have jobs when they are done merging and then splitting into three successor companies in a couple of years. So Delaware Gov. Jack Markell and state legislators from both parties say they felt they didn't have much choice but to give these highly profitable chemical-makers millions in grants and tax concessions, in hopes they won't fire or move more people away.
BUSINESS
March 16, 2016 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Staff Writer
Just three months after he was named DuPont Co.'s top plastics executive, Patrick E. Lindner has quit the company where he worked for 20 years to join Delaware-based W.L. Gore & Associates, the privately held $3 billion developer of Gore-Tex fabrics. "He brings a broad range of complementary experience and expertise to Gore," Gore spokeswoman Amy Calhoun said Monday. "We're confident he will contribute in many ways. " Gore, which employs 10,000, eschews traditional business titles.
BUSINESS
March 4, 2016 | By Joseph N. Distefano, Staff Writer
Dow Chemical Co. and the DuPont Co. have agreed to pay Dow's lame-duck CEO, Andrew Liveris, $53 million in cash, stock, and tax reimbursement payments, and DuPont CEO Edward Breen $27 million in 2017 after the combined companies break into three successor firms, the companies told investors and the Securities and Exchange Commission in a filing Wednesday. The CEOs have assembled these multimillion-dollar pay packages, which the company filing calls "golden parachutes," while planning and executing billions of dollars in cost cuts and plant and warehouse closings.
BUSINESS
February 21, 2016 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Staff Writer
In what Gov. Jack Markell called "a win for Delaware," the DuPont Co. and Dow Chemical Co. said Friday that they had picked DuPont's Chestnut Run office complex outside Wilmington as the headquarters for top officials of their planned new combined pesticide and seed company, which will bear the DuPont name. Delaware promised income-tax rebates for workers earning above $70,000 a year, $6 million in construction capital expenditure grants, and $3.6 million "to support employment" to keep the headquarters, state officials said in a statement.
BUSINESS
January 13, 2016
Scholars, shareholders, the newly separated, and the long-frustrated have plenty to say about cuts to the central research and business units at DuPont Co. by new CEO Edward Breen . Some highlights: "DuPont struggled with return on R&D over the years," notes Ben duPont , a shareholder and past manager at the chemical giant that bears his ancestor's name. "For 40 years, like a drumbeat, every few years DuPont introduced a new blockbuster product - nylon, Teflon, Tyvek, Delrin, Kevlar, Lycra, Kapton, Neoprene, Mylar . " (They weren't all blockbusters; duPont still has a pair of Corfam shoes - the Edsel of leather.)
BUSINESS
January 11, 2016
The gang now running DuPont Co. , that incubator of 20th-century U.S. industry, is scrapping many of its Wilmington headquarters institutions, as if they were old Rust Belt factories. Glowing paints and super plastics, miracle fabrics and insulators, electronics and fuel additives and their often toxic by-products are just a few of DuPont's highlights. Its science and engineering created that new-car smell, the snug and cleanable feel of a mass-marketed American home, and the security and menace of a fully equipped American soldier.
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