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Dwight Yoakam

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NEWS
July 22, 1997 | Reviews by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Under the Covers Dwight Yoakam (Reprise) 1/2 In the bygone eras of pop, there were singers and there were songwriters, and rarely did the twain meet. But in this age of the complete pop artist, the musician who devotes a full album to "cover" versions is quite the curio. Dwight Yoakam's new spin down this course proves one of the more entertaining I've heard, because of the success that he and producer Pete Anderson have had in transforming foreign material to the artist's down-home country oeuvre.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 1996 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dwight Yoakam is the most cinematic of country music stars. The Pikeville, Ky.-born, Los Angeles-based hillbilly classicist casts himself in cowboy noir songs as a wounded but self-reliant romantic who walks the lonely streets and empty hallways. On Sunday at Atlantic City's Mark G. Etess Arena, Yoakam never lost his cool. From 1986's Guitars, Cadillacs, Etc. Etc. to last year's masterfully diverse Gone, his lean, country-rooted songs have been perennially blue. But for all of his fixation on loss, Yoakam isn't one to get wracked with emotion.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 1993 | By Dan DeLuca, FOR THE INQUIRER
The really disappointing thing about Dwight Yoakam's show at Mann Music Center on Tuesday was that the sound mix was so bad. It wasn't surprising that Yoakam was stiff on stage, or that he used his acoustic guitar more as a prop to pose with than as an instrument to play. Yoakam is at home in the deliberate, exacting world of the recording studio, not the chancy forum of the concert stage. And while he can dress the part of the rebel in skin-tight leather and hat brim down to his nose, the brooding bad-boy effect is not as easy to pull off on a bandstand as it is in a fashion spread or an album cover.
NEWS
January 28, 2013 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Dwight Yoakam is a neo-classicist who's been so good for so long neither the prefix nor suffix are applicable any longer. Sure, the Pikeville, Ky.-born, Los Angeles-based country singer in skinny jeans and hat sloped low over his brow dotted his 100-minute set at the Golden Nugget in Atlantic City on Saturday with hits originally recorded by his forebears, from Lefty Frizzell's "Always Late With Your Kisses" to Buck Owens' "Streets of Bakersfield....
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1986 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer
Has the curse on country music finally been lifted from our town? For what seems like eons, Valley Forge Music Fair has been the only commercial concert promoter in these parts that's dared touch this American form on a regular basis. Now, city showcases like J.C. Dobbs and the Chestnut Cabaret put country music on stage, sensing that there's a new constituency brewing for the righteous roots music. The fact that WXTU radio scored well in the winter Arbitron ratings is one indicator of change in the wind.
NEWS
September 12, 1988 | By Tom Moon, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
In the title song from Dwight Yoakam's recently released album, Buenas Noches From a Lonely Room, the protagonist catches his woman sleeping with another man. He remembers the good times - "she wore red dresses" - but is driven to correct this betrayal, the most common one in country music. He chronicles the event with the dispassion of a nature-documentary narrator; then he kills her. The plot line might be Country Cliche 101, but Dwight Yoakam says it actually happened to him - except the last part.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2012
Late Show With David Letterman (11:35 p.m., CBS3) - Actress Salma Hayek; actor Nick Offerman; Kiss performs. The Tonight Show With Jay Leno (11:35 p.m., NBC10) - Comic Chelsea Handler; Placido Domingo. Jimmy Kimmel Live (Midnight, 6ABC) - Will Arnett; Chris Elliott; Dwight Yoakam performs. Late Night With Jimmy Fallon (12:35 a.m., NBC10) - Tina Fey; Terry O'Quinn; Ellie Goulding performs.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2013
Dwight Yoakam From Guitars, Cadillacs, Etc., Etc. , his 1984 debut EP, through to 2005's Blame the Vain , Dwight Yoakam remained remarkably consistent and prolific, positioning his clean, well-crafted postmodern honky-tonk outside the lines of rigid Nashville music-making strictures. The Los Angeles-based singer and actor took some time off before returning with last year's Three Pears (Warner Bros.), however, and the album benefits greatly from a renewed sense of purpose, with contributions from Beck and Kid Rock, among others.
NEWS
April 18, 1992 | By Lee Winfrey, INQUIRER TV WRITER
One of country music's sexiest young stars, Dwight Yoakam, lights up the little screen in an incandescent season premiere for American Music Shop on cable TV tonight. After presenting 30-minute installments in its first two seasons, American Music Shop has expanded to one hour for its third year, beginning at 10 on the Nashville Network. Besides Yoakam, other guests are Emmylou Harris, Kelly Willis, Patty Loveless and bluegrass master Ralph Stanley. Born in Pikeville, Ky., Yoakam (pronounced YO-come)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 2006 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You snooze, you lose. That's the problem facing Chelios (Euro action star Jason Statham) in Crank. A hit man for a West Coast crime syndicate, Chelios has been injected with a "Beijing cocktail" by rival hood Verona (Jose Pablo Cantillo). It's a poison with a fatal effect that can be delayed only with a steady flow of adrenaline. In other words, Chelios has to keep his heart beating in his ears or he dies. From this implausible concept, a visceral variation on Speed, emerges a startlingly entertaining and original film.
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NEWS
January 28, 2013 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Dwight Yoakam is a neo-classicist who's been so good for so long neither the prefix nor suffix are applicable any longer. Sure, the Pikeville, Ky.-born, Los Angeles-based country singer in skinny jeans and hat sloped low over his brow dotted his 100-minute set at the Golden Nugget in Atlantic City on Saturday with hits originally recorded by his forebears, from Lefty Frizzell's "Always Late With Your Kisses" to Buck Owens' "Streets of Bakersfield....
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2013
Dwight Yoakam From Guitars, Cadillacs, Etc., Etc. , his 1984 debut EP, through to 2005's Blame the Vain , Dwight Yoakam remained remarkably consistent and prolific, positioning his clean, well-crafted postmodern honky-tonk outside the lines of rigid Nashville music-making strictures. The Los Angeles-based singer and actor took some time off before returning with last year's Three Pears (Warner Bros.), however, and the album benefits greatly from a renewed sense of purpose, with contributions from Beck and Kid Rock, among others.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2012
Late Show With David Letterman (11:35 p.m., CBS3) - Actress Salma Hayek; actor Nick Offerman; Kiss performs. The Tonight Show With Jay Leno (11:35 p.m., NBC10) - Comic Chelsea Handler; Placido Domingo. Jimmy Kimmel Live (Midnight, 6ABC) - Will Arnett; Chris Elliott; Dwight Yoakam performs. Late Night With Jimmy Fallon (12:35 a.m., NBC10) - Tina Fey; Terry O'Quinn; Ellie Goulding performs.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 2006 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You snooze, you lose. That's the problem facing Chelios (Euro action star Jason Statham) in Crank. A hit man for a West Coast crime syndicate, Chelios has been injected with a "Beijing cocktail" by rival hood Verona (Jose Pablo Cantillo). It's a poison with a fatal effect that can be delayed only with a steady flow of adrenaline. In other words, Chelios has to keep his heart beating in his ears or he dies. From this implausible concept, a visceral variation on Speed, emerges a startlingly entertaining and original film.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2002 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Panic Room begins with a coolly designed title sequence, an aerial camera glide up the isle of Manhattan, from way downtown to the Upper West Side, from thrumming skyscraper industry to the tree-lined blocks of brownstones sitting in pricey, peaceful proximity to Central Park. It is on one such block, in one rather grand townhouse ("townstone," the Realtor loftily proclaims), that David Fincher's adeptly orchestrated thriller takes place. Essentially a Home Alone for grown-ups - burglars lay siege to a house and its seemingly powerless occupants - the picture stars Jodie Foster as a just-divorced mom who moves into new digs with her moody tomboy daughter (a terrific Kristen Stewart, who really does look like a junior Jodie)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2000 | By Nick Cristiano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dwight Yoakam sure knows how to care of business. The backdrop for the Hollywood hillbilly's Monday night show at the Washington Township Center for the Performing Arts was three floor-to-ceiling banners that proclaimed the title of his next CD, Tomorrow's Sounds Today, still a good seven weeks from release. Given their huge scale, the words carried the weight of a pronouncement tinged by either arrogance or irony. Yoakam has never been a trendsetter, but give him his due: He's a country traditionalist who knows better than to focus entirely on the past, as he showed during a performance that, for all its musical thrills, proceeded with brisk efficiency.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 1999 | By Jennifer Weiner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
We've all heard the dirt on Comedy Central's The Man Show, USA Network's Happy Hour, and The X Show on FX, the current spate of dirt-cheap variety-show- style cable programs that glory in booze, babes, third-tier celebrities, and jokes about bodily emissions. Critics hold their noses. Fans - or at least the rowdies recruited for the live studio audiences - seem to revel in the shows' in- your-face political incorrectness, and the bevy of gyrating, rump- shaking, bikini-wearing dancers.
NEWS
July 22, 1997 | Reviews by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Under the Covers Dwight Yoakam (Reprise) 1/2 In the bygone eras of pop, there were singers and there were songwriters, and rarely did the twain meet. But in this age of the complete pop artist, the musician who devotes a full album to "cover" versions is quite the curio. Dwight Yoakam's new spin down this course proves one of the more entertaining I've heard, because of the success that he and producer Pete Anderson have had in transforming foreign material to the artist's down-home country oeuvre.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 1996 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dwight Yoakam is the most cinematic of country music stars. The Pikeville, Ky.-born, Los Angeles-based hillbilly classicist casts himself in cowboy noir songs as a wounded but self-reliant romantic who walks the lonely streets and empty hallways. On Sunday at Atlantic City's Mark G. Etess Arena, Yoakam never lost his cool. From 1986's Guitars, Cadillacs, Etc. Etc. to last year's masterfully diverse Gone, his lean, country-rooted songs have been perennially blue. But for all of his fixation on loss, Yoakam isn't one to get wracked with emotion.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1993 | By W. Speers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This story also contains material from the Associated Press, the New York Post and USA Today
Dwight Yoakam, who lost his home to this week's fires in Southern California, vows to rebuild in the rugged hills 40 miles west of downtown L.A. "He loves it there," said a spokesman. The country singer's four horses were saved at the property. Famous neighbors' houses spared included those belonging to Tom Selleck, Jack Nicholson, Sophia Loren and Dick Clark. Flames consumed about 50 acres of ranch land surrounding Selleck's place but stopped short of his house when they came up against a line of fire-resistant bushes.
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