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February 1, 2009 | BY THE INQUIRER STAFF
The Kixx downed the first-place Baltimore Blast, 13-6, last night in a National Indoor Soccer League game at First Mariner Arena. Peter Pappas stopped eight of 11 shots for the Kixx, who improved to 5-5. Baltimore fell to 7-2. Forward Hewerton Moreira recorded a three-point goal and an assist to extend his point and goal streak to a team-high eight games.
NEWS
December 15, 1986 | By Dave Caldwell, Inquirer Staff Writer
The point, Dave Mulholland says, is to keep the other team pointless. "If we keep them in the low 50s - and if we score 55 or so ourselves, we're capable of winning every game," said Mulholland, Archbishop Ryan's basketball coach. Mulholland's defense-oriented scheme worked like a dream Friday night as the Raiders (3-1) pulled out a 57-51 nonleague victory at home over St. Joseph's Prep. Ryan has won the three games in which it has held an opponent to fewer than 60 points.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 2008 | By JEROME MAIDA For the Daily News
Dynamite has distinguished itself the past few years by carefully choosing projects and having virtually all of them look fantastic and be entertaining reads. This has been especially true of their licensed properties such as "Zorro," "The Lone Ranger" and "Battlestar Galactica. " So it is only fitting that their latest attempt to draw in fans looking for new adventures of a popular property features perhaps the most unstoppable icon of them all, in "Terminator: Revolution. " While sure to please hardcore fans, writer Simon Furman also makes the book accessible to readers unfamiliar with the franchise.
SPORTS
May 6, 1986 | By DICK WEISS, Daily News Sports Writer
It took a while for Paul Pressey to surface last night at the Spectrum. But when he did, Milwaukee's versatile point forward made the Sixers disappear like a David Copperfield illusion. Pressey scored 15 of his 17 points in the second half of a 109-104 victory that tied the NBA quarterfinal series at two games and restored the Bucks' homecourt advantage. "We had our foot in the hole," Pressey said. "We would have been in the hole if we had lost this game tonight. We kind of feel like we're back on level ground now and that's going to give us another chance to recuperate.
NEWS
August 18, 2006 | By Bonnie L. Cook INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Police and explosives experts yesterday called off the search for 40 sticks of dynamite the son of a Lower Providence Township woman said he had buried years ago in her backyard. The Montgomery County bomb squad dug for a day and a half before declaring the neighborhood safe. Workers using shovels and then a backhoe dug a 400-square-foot by 5-foot-deep hole but found no explosives, police said. By yesterday afternoon, the hole had been filled in. Six homes in the neighborhood near Buckwalter and Egypt Roads were evacuated and traffic was rerouted during the excavation work.
NEWS
June 23, 1987 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
Frank Dainese, self-proclaimed "nitroglycerin man," ran his fingers along the 2-by-16-inch tube of brown waxed paper. He handled it as he might a fine piece of jewelry. "That's a damn good stick of dynamite," he said. "Feel the density. It's well-filled. It's a beautiful stick. I hate to see it replaced. " After more than 40 years researching, making, selling and detonating all kinds of explosives, however, Dainese realizes that - sentimentality notwithstanding - dynamite is no longer the explosive of choice.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2009 | By JEROME MAIDA For the Daily News
With "Buck Rogers," Dynamite has taken yet another iconic character and updated him for today's audiences. It may be their most impressive endeavor to date. Why? Because unlike most of the properties in their stable, there have been no projects starring the character in decades. If you take away the TV show starring Gil Gerard in the 1970s - which disappointed die-hard Buck Rogers fans - there have been no truly memorable stories told starring the character in any medium in a long, long time.
SPORTS
December 6, 2009 | By John Gonzalez, Inquirer Columnist
Poor Donovan McNabb. The guy can't win - even when the Eagles do. For years, people complained that Five is incapable of engineering a fourth-quarter comeback. Then he did just that against the Bears (even though there was a fair amount of time remaining on the clock) and the Redskins over the last two weeks. Naturally, the detractors apologized and gave credit where it's due, right? Not quite. After the Washington game, I received e-mails from fans who complained - and stop me if this sounds familiar - about how McNabb is inaccurate on short routes and won't ever win a Super Bowl because blah, blah, blah.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2009 | By JEROME MAIDA For the Daily News
THIS WEEK, Comics Guy takes a look at "Battlestar Galactica: Cylon War," Dynamite's latest spinoff series based on the popular sci-fi show. Yet again, they have successfully explored a part of the "BSG" mythology that has barely been mined for stories and done so in a way that not only entertains but strengthens the entire franchise. It is in this series that we learn how one of mankind's greatest assets turned into one of its most deadly foes. While the show began with a "war" that lasted little more than an eyeblink and resulted in the Cylons almost wiping out humanity, we see the seeds of the First Cylon War - as it is often called - being planted 40 years before the TV series takes place.
NEWS
September 3, 1992 | by Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Evon "Bonnie" Butcher, a retired expediter for General Electric, died Tuesday. She was 49 and lived in Mount Airy. Butcher was employed by General Electric for more than 25 years before retiring about two years ago on a disability. She had worked at the King of Prussia facility and more recently at the 32nd and Chestnut streets operation. "Bonnie was more than a daughter-in-law. She was a loving, thoughtful, giving person," said Juanita Butcher, her mother-in-law. " . . . She had a beautiful personality; she was a dynamite person.
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SPORTS
May 7, 2015 | BY JEROME MAIDA, For the Daily News
NICK BARRUCCI runs Dynamite Entertainment, one of the world's largest and most respected comic-book companies. He has attracted top talent and compelling licensed and original material. He just launched "Swords of Sorrow," the biggest, most ambitious crossover of iconic female characters ever, told mostly by female creators, led by superstar scribe Gail Simone. But all that is not what has Nick Barrucci the most excited as Wizard Philly Con begins. It's that the spotlight of the pop-culture world is shining once again in his back yard.
NEWS
October 12, 2014 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
'A Play, a Pint and a Pie" is not your father's dinner theater. The Tiny Dynamite company's version offers: a drink, a slice of pizza, and a professional production of an hour-long play, with a new show each week. This week's is A Number by major British playwright Caryl Churchill, and it is not to be missed. A Number is about human cloning. Churchill imagines, and asks us to imagine, that if it's difficult as an adult to discover you have a twin, how unimaginably difficult it would be to discover you were one of "a number.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
AFTER NEARLY 20 years, James Bond is returning to comics. Dynamite Entertainment, of Mount Laurel, N.J., has announced perhaps the biggest deal in its history, landing the worldwide rights to publish comic books, digital comics and graphic novels starring Ian Fleming 's Secret Agent 007. As part of the deal, Dynamite plans to create a series of brand-new adventures about the little-known early years of Bond's career, in addition to bringing...
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2014 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer takiffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5960
THE GODFATHER of Soul. Mr. Dynamite. Soul Brother No. 1. And who can forget . . . The Hardest Working Man in Show Business. If you're of a certain age, you know immediately who we're talking about - James Brown - and are likely intrigued by the flavorful biography of this complicated man, "Get on Up," which hard-core Brown admirers-turned-movie producers Brian Grazer and Mick Jagger have brought to the screen. Yeah, that Mick Jagger. But a lot of water has passed under the dam. Brown's gospel/soul-scorched first hit "Please, Please, Please" came out in 1956, when music radio was still divided (like most of the country)
NEWS
October 16, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer
WHEN CATHERINE Elizabeth Russell Minnis was a non-teaching assistant at University City High School, she earned the nickname "Grandma Dynamite. " It's not hard to imagine how she got that appelation. Catherine was a ball of energy when it came to doing something she enjoyed - like helping others. Her dedication to be of use to everyone who needed her special love and devotion was the keystone of her life and her reason for being. Catherine Minnis, whose musical talents were prized by churches in the city and suburbs that called on her to play the organ and piano for the choirs that she often organized, a community and political activist and a devoted family matriarch, died on Wednesday.
NEWS
August 19, 2012 | By Carrie Rickey, For The Inquirer
The worst day, as screenwriter Eleanor Bergstein remembers it, was when Vestron executives brought in movie producer Aaron Russo to advise how to salvage Dirty Dancing . "Burn the negative and collect the insurance money," he reportedly suggested. Had the execs heeded Russo's advice, the indie movie - released 25 years ago this week - would not have gone on to earn an Oscar, $214 million, and the fervent love of generations of moviegoers. The story behind Dirty Dancing is much like that of Bergstein's heroine, Baby (Jennifer Grey)
NEWS
June 23, 2012 | By John P. Martin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lawyers call a judge's speech to a deadlocked jury a "dynamite charge," the workingman's nickname for a bid to blast through an impasse. On Wednesday, the 12th day of jury deliberations in the 13th week of the child-endangerment and sex-abuse trial of two Archdiocese of Philadelphia priests, the dynamite sticks came out. It just wasn't clear who might get hurt. Common Pleas Court Judge M. Teresa Sarmina's directive could dislodge a verdict in the landmark trial of a Catholic Church supervisor.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2011 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
Before reality television dames were dripped in diamonds, draped in furs, and devoted to their dogs, there was the beautiful, raven-haired, violet-eyed fashion and lifestyle icon Elizabeth Taylor. From the time Taylor began her film career in Lassie Come Home at the tender age of 10, women and young girls have been coveting her on-screen style choices, from those jodhpur pants in National Velvet to the lace and silk white slip she favored in 1958's sultry Cat on a Hot Tin Roof . "She wasn't a fashion person, but her images in whatever role she was playing . . . would be picked up by everyone," said Jane Likens, associate professor of fashion design at Philadelphia University.
SPORTS
November 8, 2010 | By MARCUS HAYES, hayesm@phillynews.com
This game of giants changes remarkably when one of its littlest threats takes the field. DeSean Jackson yesterday returned from a concussion and, with a special helmet hopefully designed to lessen the risk of further head trauma, Jackson provided the answers to every question the Colts' defense offered. He caught a 9-yard touchdown pass less than 2 minutes into the game. He burned the Colts for a 58-yard reception 10 minutes into the quarter that set up a field goal. He took a pair of end-around handoffs 11 yards, then 6 yards, to help milk 69 seconds off the clock near the end of the Eagles' 26-24 win. "He's able to do so many things other players can't do," said quarterback Michael Vick, who also returned from injury.
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