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Dyslexia

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NEWS
September 4, 1994 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
As a youngster, Linda Tessler loved to borrow books from her local library, even though she couldn't read them. She took out books with titles she wanted to read and enjoyed just touching the smooth covers and leafing through the pages. "I was tested in the sixth grade and they said I was bright, but no one knew how to help me," Tessler, 45, said. "They didn't know why I couldn't read. " In junior high school, students were grouped by ability, so she said she became an "official member of the dumb kids' class.
SPORTS
April 11, 1986 | By TED SILARY, Daily News Sports Writer
To explain the problem in its simplest terms, imagine a teacher writing the word "cat" on the blackboard. Then imagine a student looking at the same blackboard but having "cta" or "tca" registering in his brain. For four years at Our Mother of Divine Grace school, including two as a first-grader, such was the frustration of Joe Gravinese. The 6-foot, 205-pound linebacker from Jules Mastbaum Tech, who will represent the Public League Sunday in the 12th annual Daily News Eagles City- All-Star Game at Northeast High (2 p.m.)
SPORTS
February 24, 1989 | By Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
While obliging an autograph seeker, he might sign "Ajsno Wraely" instead of "Jason Warley. " While glancing at a famous book's cover, he might see "Cachtre in teh Yre" instead of "Catcher in the Rye. " Jason Warley is not unintelligent. He is, however, afflicted with dyslexia, a disease that causes people to juxtapose letters, words and numbers while reading and writing, and even leave some out altogether. Yesterday, after his most prolific scoring game in a Frankford uniform - 33 points in a 92-51, Public League quarterfinal demolition of visiting West Philadelphia - Warley agreed to discuss the learning disability.
NEWS
December 31, 1992 | By Gail Gibson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The 100 clocks that fill Abraham Schmitt's Souderton home create a steady order for a man who calls his life chaotic and confusing. It seems an odd way to describe the life of a 65-year-old man who has completed four academic degrees, including a doctorate in social work from the University of Pennsylvania. But this quiet, slender man, who counsels families from his home and builds his own clocks, said it is a fitting description of living with dyslexia. The odder thing, he said, is that he discovered his confusion had a name only five years ago. Until a client described the symptoms of the learning disability to him, Schmitt traced the classroom problems that followed him throughout his academic career to his childhood in Saskatchewan.
NEWS
June 5, 1997 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / TOM GRALISH
Carol Dye, 52, is congratulated by son James Taylor on getting her General Equivalency Diploma. Dye, who has severe arthritis and dyslexia, was among about 50 with disabilities so honored yesterday in the Free Library of Philadelphia's Library for the Blind and Physically Handicapped. Low funding had delayed ceremonies.
NEWS
June 25, 1990 | BY BARBARA A. JACKSON
One percent of children with severe learning disabilities have dyslexia, a medical condition that affects children's ability to read. Dyslexic children have neurological dysfunctions that manifest themselves as symptoms of hyperactivity (inability to concentrate) and strephosymbolia (reading letters and numerals backward). The cause of dyslexia is still unknown, but doctors blame brain damage and other organic dysfunctions for the ailment. However, there are far too many normal children exhibiting symptoms of dyslexia that are not the result of chemical and physical abnormalities.
NEWS
January 16, 1992 | Compiled from Daily News wire services
BOSTON DRINKING WATER A SOURCE OF LEGIONNAIRES' DISEASE Using genetic engineering techniques to fingerprint the bacteria responsible for Legionnaires' disease, medical detectives have discovered that drinking water is an important source of the potentially fatal pneumonia. In tests of 20 people with Legionnaires', a research team led by Janet E. Stout discovered that eight had been made ill by bacteria identical to Legionnaires' found in the water they had been drinking.
NEWS
August 22, 1992 | by Mark McDonald, Daily News Staff Writer
It's not easy playing the role of Solomon. Just ask Mayor Rendell. The Italian-American community believes the Art Commission chairman is a bigot taken to using ethnic slurs like "dago. " But the mayor believes chairman Theodore Newbold's contention that he has dyslexia and was trying to describe the Penn's Landing snack bar with its blue, red, white and yellow colors as "Day-Glo. " Newbold's gaffe occurred at the Art Commission's June meeting. Yesterday, a group of Italian-American politicians and community leaders met with Rendell for the second time.
LIVING
April 28, 2010 | By Anndee Hochman FOR THE INQUIRER
George Racette, an 80-year-old former industrial research and design specialist, is reading about relativity. "Space and time seem like straightforward ideas," he reads aloud in an even, avuncular voice. "Or so it seemed to everyone until 1905. " Racette sits in a soundproof booth, black headset clamped over his ears, a copy of College Physics: A Strategic Approach, open to page 899. Just outside the booth is his "director," 70-year-old Richard Tave, a former chemical engineer whose task, this morning, is to follow the text while Racette reads, making sure he captures every word of the book - including graphs, photos, captions and marginal notes - accurately.
NEWS
May 7, 1992
Because she suffers from dyslexia, a reading disorder that hinders the ability to integrate auditory and visual information - it follows that Joan Lichtman might not be a good student. But the truth is just the opposite: Lichtman, a certified public accountant who has a health care delivery consulting business, has advanced degrees in accounting, mathematics and education. Though she suffers from severe arthritis, Lichtman also works as a ministerial and therapeutic clown, performing in schools, churches and hospitals as well as being a committed volunteer mentor through the Philadelphia Futures organization.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 5, 2013
Mike Lupoli's dyslexia nearly derailed his academic career. When he was in sixth grade, his school principal, unaware of his handicap, cautioned him not to consider college. Lupoli disregarded that warning. "I had to work a little harder," he says, "but I graduated with honors. " For the last 19 years, Lupoli, 56, has been a phys-ed teacher at Sabold Elementary School in Springfield, Delaware County. He believes his dyslexia has proved a professional advantage that has enabled him to contribute to the well-being of his youthful charges.
LIVING
April 28, 2010 | By Anndee Hochman FOR THE INQUIRER
George Racette, an 80-year-old former industrial research and design specialist, is reading about relativity. "Space and time seem like straightforward ideas," he reads aloud in an even, avuncular voice. "Or so it seemed to everyone until 1905. " Racette sits in a soundproof booth, black headset clamped over his ears, a copy of College Physics: A Strategic Approach, open to page 899. Just outside the booth is his "director," 70-year-old Richard Tave, a former chemical engineer whose task, this morning, is to follow the text while Racette reads, making sure he captures every word of the book - including graphs, photos, captions and marginal notes - accurately.
NEWS
November 5, 2004 | By Connie Langland INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
All children are born dyslexic - it's just that "some are easy to cure. " So says Jack Fletcher, one of the reading researchers presenting provocative information at the annual International Dyslexia Association conference, now under way at the Convention Center. Fletcher's specialty focuses on instructional methods and interventions backed by research - including brain-imaging that shows which parts of the brain are activated as a child reads. "Effective instruction changes the brain very dramatically," said Fletcher, a professor of pediatrics at the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston.
NEWS
September 13, 2004 | By Gloria Hochman FOR THE INQUIRER
You heard his outrageous one-liners on WIP radio when he was part of the station's popular "morning team. " Now he has you grinning all the way to work as you listen to him on WMMR, impersonating, with dagger-sharp precision, politicians, entertainers and sports heroes, his voice dissolving from that of former president Bill Clinton to singer Johnny Mathis to basketball star Allen Iverson. Funny, talented guy, this Joe Conklin. What you don't know is that Conklin's inner voice is anything but comical.
NEWS
July 25, 2004 | By Rosalee Polk Rhodes INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Sherry Garwood knew when her daughter entered first grade that there was something wrong. "I noticed that she was struggling and having a hard time," Garwood said. Paige was having trouble reading. She hated books. When it was time for homework, Paige would hide under the table. Garwood said that her 6-year-old's reading assignments called for her to read for about 20 minutes each day from books given to her by her teacher. But Paige would hide the books. "She didn't want to read them," Garwood said.
NEWS
May 21, 2004 | By Connie Langland INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
By the time Tracy Johnson realized she was dyslexic, she was in her mid-20s, cleaning classrooms for a living, and frustrated that her love of learning seldom translated into academic success. In grade school, Johnson had been diagnosed as "learning disabled," a label that stuck through high school and a failed try at community college. Other students called her stupid. "Something inside me was saying, 'I don't belong here.' I always knew I had potential," said Johnson, 31, a lifelong Philadelphian.
NEWS
March 4, 2004 | By Connie Langland INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For parents of children with dyslexia and other reading problems, breakthroughs most often come one page at a time. When reading is a struggle for a child, the parent worries, learns as much as possible about remedies, and tries to remain upbeat. These days, parents, as well as educators who focus on reading issues, are paying close attention to the work of Sally Shaywitz, codirector of the Center for the Study of Learning and Retention at Yale University, and her husband, researcher Bennett Shaywitz.
NEWS
June 25, 2003 | By Connie Langland INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
These are heady times for researchers studying the causes of - and the cures for - dyslexia, a learning disability that may affect one in five readers. Researchers using magnetic resonance imaging technology to study brain activity in children have confirmed that there is a biological basis for reading disabilities, and they have pinpointed the brain regions that are activated as children learn to read. Moreover, researchers at leading brain-study centers have shown that intensive remedial efforts can improve reading ability.
LIVING
September 25, 2000 | By Peter Mucha, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Candidates misspeak. We all know that. Al Gore once said, "A zebra does not change its spots. " And he praised "Michael Jackson" as the star of the Chicago Bulls. But when the latest issue of Vanity Fair came out, George W. Bush found himself denying the suggestion that he has dyslexia. Author Gail Sheehy said the learning disability might explain his tendency to commit verbal mistakes, such as saying "tacular weapons" instead of "tactical nuclear weapons" or "cuff links" instead of "handcuffs.
NEWS
June 5, 1997 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / TOM GRALISH
Carol Dye, 52, is congratulated by son James Taylor on getting her General Equivalency Diploma. Dye, who has severe arthritis and dyslexia, was among about 50 with disabilities so honored yesterday in the Free Library of Philadelphia's Library for the Blind and Physically Handicapped. Low funding had delayed ceremonies.
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