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NEWS
March 19, 2012
Publishers and libraries are at odds over how to satisfy the public's craving for electronic books. How they resolve this thorny issue will have a tremendous impact on readers. Fearing potentially crippling losses, publishers are withholding e-books from libraries, charging them more than other customers, or limiting how many times a library can lend an e-book. That bumps into librarians' unwavering commitment to promote literacy, preserve culture, and make books available to people regardless of their financial situation.
NEWS
April 11, 2012 | BY MICHAEL HINKELMAN, Daily News Staff Writer
Three of the nation's largest publishers agreed to settle an antitrust lawsuit filed Wednesday by the Justice Department alleging that five publishers and Apple Inc. conspired to fix prices consumers pay for e-books. Attorney General Eric Holder said at a news conference in Washington that publishers Hachette, HarperCollins and Simon & Schuster agreed to let retailers such as Amazon and Barnes & Noble set the consumer prices of their e-book titles. The proposed settlement, which must be approved by a federal judge, upended a business model that had increased the prices of many best-selling e-books from $9.99 to as much as $12.99 or $14.99.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2000 | By Jennifer Weiner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When best-selling horror author Stephen King released a new novella that could be accessed only on the Internet, it felt like the equivalent of an earthquake rippling through the publishing world. But was this a real revolution, or merely irrefutable proof of an unquestioned fact - that the book-reading world loves Stephen King, and especially loves getting his new stuff for free? Was the release of Riding the Bullet a signal event, the "killer app" that would cause bibliophiles to abandon their hardcovers and paperbacks in favor of e-books?
NEWS
May 23, 2011 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Burlington County librarian has become a leader in a crusade against a major publishing house that has set a limit on how many times its e-books may be borrowed from public libraries. HarperCollins advised libraries in March that they would have to repurchase an e-book after it had been checked out 26 times, a move that has drawn widespread criticism and has cash-strapped libraries concerned about the cost of stocking the increasingly popular electronic books. Some of the publisher's own authors have called on it to end the policy, which the company said was necessary to keep the business viable.
NEWS
May 14, 2000 | By Heather N. Bandur, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Toting around a clumsy paperback is a daily chore for Esther Sears, who gobbles up a few pages here and there every time she can - even during her routine walks to and from the bank on Route 45. But with the recent introduction of electronic books, or e-books, at the Gloucester County Library where Sears works, the 51-year-old business office clerk can carry around a small hand-held gadget and access up to five books at once. "I think it's great," Sears said. "I can't think of anything better than to go to the Internet, download whatever books you want, and have five books in one place.
NEWS
August 13, 2012 | By Siobhan A. Reardon
As e-books continue to grow in popularity, more and more people are visiting the Free Library of Philadelphia or logging on to freelibrary.org to check out our digital titles. While we currently offer more than 32,000 e-books for download - and are continually working to expand our digital collections - many of our customers wonder why they can't find the latest e-book bestsellers from Jennifer Weiner, Jeffrey Eugenides, or a host of other acclaimed authors. After all, the Free Library has plenty of physical copies of books by those same writers.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2000 | By Carlin Romano, INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
The editorial cartoon projected above keynote speaker Jeff Bezos' head in the Grand Ballroom didn't need an explanation, and the founder of Amazon.com didn't provide one. "I can't figure out how you caught malaria," a puzzled doctor says to a feverish, sickly looking patient. "Well," the patient replies, "I did order that mosquito off Amazon.com " The booksellers in the audience laughed, and Bezos chuckled - actually, he honked - with them. Nearly a thousand strong, mainly owners or employees of independent bookstores, they had come early for the opening educational days of BookExpo America, the annual gathering of about 30,000 book-industry professionals held here at McCormick Place last weekend, a rite of spring in which publishers display and sell their fall and winter wares, and booksellers scrutinize and buy them.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 2013 | By Frank Wilson, For The Inquirer
Bedford Park in West London was the world's first garden suburb. It was started in 1875 when a fellow named Jonathan Carr, inspired by the Aesthetic Movement and the ideas of John Ruskin and William Morris, bought 24 acres of land just north of Turnham Green Station, a mere 30 minutes by train from the City of London. At one time or another, poet William Butler Yeats, playwright Arthur Wing Pinero, and the French painter Camille Pissarro lived there. It figures as Saffron Park in G.K. Chesterton's novel The Man Who Was Thursday and as Biggleswick in John Buchan's Mr. Standfast . In Bedford Park , British author Bryan Appleyard's new novel, it makes yet another literary appearance, this time under its own name.
BUSINESS
April 22, 2012 | By Maria Panaritis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The story of P.K. Sindwani and his suburban Philadelphia bookstore is a saga of the beleaguered bookselling industry: good intentions, crazy times, and anyone's guess as to how things will turn out. For nearly two decades, Sindwani had done well at his shop near Ursinus College. But in 2010, with an anchor supermarket dying next door and the industry transforming at an exasperating pace, things got so tough that the onetime accountant and lifelong book lover was planning an exit strategy.
LIVING
June 7, 2000 | By Carlin Romano, INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
As the techno revolution shook book publishing last weekend at BookExpo America here - all the e-books casting come-hither looks and sales assistants promising to download or print-on-demand your grandmother, M&Ms, your much-rejected novel, anything you want - a few subversives mounted rearguard actions. The folks running the "Guerrilla Marketing for Writers" booth, using nothing more complicated than a large paper pad and black Magic Marker, operated one diversion at the nation's annual gathering of publishing professionals that proved plenty of fun. (No one accuses e-books of being fun.)
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 2013 | By Frank Wilson, For The Inquirer
Bedford Park in West London was the world's first garden suburb. It was started in 1875 when a fellow named Jonathan Carr, inspired by the Aesthetic Movement and the ideas of John Ruskin and William Morris, bought 24 acres of land just north of Turnham Green Station, a mere 30 minutes by train from the City of London. At one time or another, poet William Butler Yeats, playwright Arthur Wing Pinero, and the French painter Camille Pissarro lived there. It figures as Saffron Park in G.K. Chesterton's novel The Man Who Was Thursday and as Biggleswick in John Buchan's Mr. Standfast . In Bedford Park , British author Bryan Appleyard's new novel, it makes yet another literary appearance, this time under its own name.
BUSINESS
July 12, 2013 | By Larry Neumeister, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Apple Inc. broke antitrust laws and conspired with publishers to raise electronic book prices significantly in spring 2010, a federal judge ruled Wednesday, citing "compelling evidence" from the words of the late Steve Jobs. U.S. District Judge Denise Cote said Apple knew that no publisher could risk acting alone to try to eliminate Amazon.com's $9.99 price for the most popular e-books, so it "created a mechanism and environment that enabled them to act together in a matter of weeks to eliminate all retail price competition for their e-books.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2013 | By Molly Eichel
NORTH PHILLY-BORN and -raised comedian Kevin Hart is opening his wallet to give kids free e-book access to Lorene Carey 's Free! Great Escapes from Slavery on the Underground Railroad . Illustrations for the children's book, about the harrowing experiences of brave individuals who escaped the tyranny of slavery, were done by Please Touch Museum artist-in-residence, Beth Lewis . The free e-book, made possible through Hart's generous...
BUSINESS
October 19, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
Buyers of e-books should make sure they get their fair share of a settlement agreed to by several of the nation's biggest publishers, advises the Pennsylvania Attorney General's Office. The $69 million credit-or-refund deal applies to e-books purchased in every state but Minnesota from April 1, 2010, to May 21 of this year if they were published by Hachette, HarperCollins, Simon & Schuster, Penguin, Macmillan, or certain imprints or subsidiaries of those companies, which allegedly charged inflated prices or fixed prices.
NEWS
October 3, 2012 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
I WOULDN'T NORMALLY feel sorry for a man like Bernie Cohen. At 86, he's had a vibrant life. He's been married to the same sweetheart, Selma, for more than six decades and is a proud father and grandfather. Although he's long retired as a clinical psychologist, he's still a professor emeritus at West Chester University, where he taught for years. And he had a fine career in private practice and managed a bustling psychiatric clinic in Norristown. He may move a little slowly, but his wits are quick and his eyes crinkle when he delivers the punch line of a favorite joke.
NEWS
August 13, 2012 | By Siobhan A. Reardon
As e-books continue to grow in popularity, more and more people are visiting the Free Library of Philadelphia or logging on to freelibrary.org to check out our digital titles. While we currently offer more than 32,000 e-books for download - and are continually working to expand our digital collections - many of our customers wonder why they can't find the latest e-book bestsellers from Jennifer Weiner, Jeffrey Eugenides, or a host of other acclaimed authors. After all, the Free Library has plenty of physical copies of books by those same writers.
BUSINESS
April 22, 2012 | By Maria Panaritis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The story of P.K. Sindwani and his suburban Philadelphia bookstore is a saga of the beleaguered bookselling industry: good intentions, crazy times, and anyone's guess as to how things will turn out. For nearly two decades, Sindwani had done well at his shop near Ursinus College. But in 2010, with an anchor supermarket dying next door and the industry transforming at an exasperating pace, things got so tough that the onetime accountant and lifelong book lover was planning an exit strategy.
NEWS
April 11, 2012 | BY MICHAEL HINKELMAN, Daily News Staff Writer
Three of the nation's largest publishers agreed to settle an antitrust lawsuit filed Wednesday by the Justice Department alleging that five publishers and Apple Inc. conspired to fix prices consumers pay for e-books. Attorney General Eric Holder said at a news conference in Washington that publishers Hachette, HarperCollins and Simon & Schuster agreed to let retailers such as Amazon and Barnes & Noble set the consumer prices of their e-book titles. The proposed settlement, which must be approved by a federal judge, upended a business model that had increased the prices of many best-selling e-books from $9.99 to as much as $12.99 or $14.99.
NEWS
March 19, 2012
Publishers and libraries are at odds over how to satisfy the public's craving for electronic books. How they resolve this thorny issue will have a tremendous impact on readers. Fearing potentially crippling losses, publishers are withholding e-books from libraries, charging them more than other customers, or limiting how many times a library can lend an e-book. That bumps into librarians' unwavering commitment to promote literacy, preserve culture, and make books available to people regardless of their financial situation.
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