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NEWS
October 3, 2012 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
I WOULDN'T NORMALLY feel sorry for a man like Bernie Cohen. At 86, he's had a vibrant life. He's been married to the same sweetheart, Selma, for more than six decades and is a proud father and grandfather. Although he's long retired as a clinical psychologist, he's still a professor emeritus at West Chester University, where he taught for years. And he had a fine career in private practice and managed a bustling psychiatric clinic in Norristown. He may move a little slowly, but his wits are quick and his eyes crinkle when he delivers the punch line of a favorite joke.
NEWS
December 29, 2009 | By Carolyn Davis INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
David Parry, Keith Goldsmith, and Sylvia Ruiz-Tresgallo were pondering the future, each in his or her own way, at the 125th annual meeting of the Modern Language Association this week in Philadelphia. That future is bringing a change from paperbound authorship to online maintenance of a scholar's writing and the discussion that surrounds it. Publishing is increasingly digital. As for the present, it's about praying to the academic gods for employment. Regina B. Oost, chair of the English Department at Wesleyan College in Macon, Ga., described the employment outlook succinctly: "Fewer jobs.
NEWS
February 29, 2004 | By Rosalee Polk Rhodes INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
For those who dread trekking to the library on snowy, rain-soaked or bone-chilling days, the Burlington County Library System is offering a way to borrow books and return them without leaving home. A new e-book service, which debuted Feb. 1, allows library system cardholders to make a few computer clicks and select books from more than 1,000 titles available on the library system's Web site. Gail Sweet, library director, said best-selling novels, children's books, classics, fiction, nonfiction and a few reference books can be downloaded, read, and returned to the library system electronically.
BUSINESS
August 29, 2000 | by Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer Daily News wire services contributed to this report
SOFTWARE GIANT Microsoft Corp. and top on-line retailer Amazon.com Inc. yesterday announced they are teaming up to sell digital books, entering what an industry expert called uncharted terrain. "It's not clear when and how this will pay off," said Peter Fader, professor of marketing at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. "The natural analogy is to look at the music industry, and the difficult time that digital and nondigital firms are having trying to figure out how to manage it. " Under the agreement, Amazon would use a customized version of Microsoft's Reader software for downloading and displaying text on a personal computer or handheld device, the companies said.
NEWS
June 10, 2008 | By Carlin Romano INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
Is the Kindle about to catch fire? Could Amazon.com's seven-month-old wireless e-book reader - a rectangular wonder in antique iPod white, able to download any of 125,000 books adapted to its format - be the tipping point that marks the decline and fall of the paper book? If those two questions continue to dominate techno-talk in the book-publishing industry, it's because book folk, being weaker in gizmo-related prognostication than, say, the devotees of a consumer electronics show, aren't sure.
LIVING
March 17, 2000 | INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Be afraid, bookstore owners. Be very afraid. On its opening day online, Stephen King's new ghost story sold more cyberspace copies than any of his best-selling novels on their first day. King's Riding the Bullet, a 66-page downloadable "e-book," racked up 400,000 orders during its first 24 hours for sale over the Internet, said Adam Rothberg, spokesman for Simon & Schuster. The figure includes downloads onto computers, Palm Pilots and electronic readers, and orders that could not be met immediately because of overwhelming demand.
NEWS
July 16, 2000 | By Erika Hobbs, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Summertime begs for easy reading. This summer, five new gadgets at the West Deptford Library could make the simple pastime almost effortless - no beach bags brimming with books, no tangle of extension cords to encumber a late-night, front porch reverie. Early this month, the library received five Rocket eBooks - slim, paperback-sized computers that store the contents of as many as 10 books in their memory. Patrons can check out the $170 gadgets for two weeks and have five novels, the maximum number the library has chosen to store on each eBook, at their fingertips.
NEWS
May 2, 2012 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
"Move over, little dog, the Big Dog's movin' in. " That line, from a great Hank Williams tune, could well stand for the situation of writer Buzz Bissinger. A Pulitzer Prize-winning former Inquirer staffer, Bissinger is a big dog in the publishing world, with his 1990 book Friday Night Lights and much else. His forthcoming book Father's Day promises to be a publishing event. But he's only one person. Only one writer. Amazon.com, now that's a bigger dog. Apple is another.
NEWS
August 26, 2001 | By Donald D. Groff FOR THE INQUIRER
Talk about a book festival with credentials. The first National Book Festival is set to unfold outside the U.S. Capitol on Sept. 8, hosted by Laura Bush and sponsored by the Library of Congress. The librarian of Congress, James H. Billington, will take part in the festivities, as will more than 50 top authors and illustrators of books for children and adults. The festival's purpose is to foster a love of reading, especially within families. Among authors planning to attend are Scott Turow, Stephen Ambrose, Gail Godwin, Sue Grafton, Steven Kellogg, Daniel Schorr, George Will, Lucille Clifton and Donald Westlake.
NEWS
June 9, 2014 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
A painter on a ladder was sanding a wall, an electrician was tugging wires from a floorplate, pages were stacking DVDs into newly installed shelving, and the man in a Teamsters T-shirt wanted to know where to deliver his crate just as a load of plastic-wrapped biographies rolled through the front door of the new Moorestown Library. "Look," joked library director Joe Galbraith. "There goes Che Guevara. " He meant the book, not the late revolutionary, but his good humor was understandable.
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