CollectionsE Books
IN THE NEWS

E Books

ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2011 | By Hillel Italie, Associated Press
At age 91, Ray Bradbury is making peace with the future he helped predict. The science fiction/fantasy author and longtime enemy of the e-book has finally allowed his dystopian classic Fahrenheit 451 to be published in digital format. Simon & Schuster released the electronic edition Tuesday at a list price of $9.99. First published in paperback by Ballantine in 1953 and as a hardcover by Simon & Schuster in the 1960s, Fahrenheit 451 has sold more than 10 million copies and has been translated into 33 languages.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2011 | By Howard Gensler
L INDSAY LOHAN'S house arrest got a bit more boring yesterday. She can't have any more house parties. She can, however, still listen to house music. And watch reruns of "House. " Superior Court Judge Stephanie Sautner chided Lindsay for having rooftop parties at her home while serving out her probation violation, but said that the actress hadn't violated any other rules. "If you are guilty of some violation of your probation, I don't see it," Sautner said.
NEWS
May 23, 2011 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Burlington County librarian has become a leader in a crusade against a major publishing house that has set a limit on how many times its e-books may be borrowed from public libraries. HarperCollins advised libraries in March that they would have to repurchase an e-book after it had been checked out 26 times, a move that has drawn widespread criticism and has cash-strapped libraries concerned about the cost of stocking the increasingly popular electronic books. Some of the publisher's own authors have called on it to end the policy, which the company said was necessary to keep the business viable.
NEWS
March 18, 2011 | Associated Press
NEW YORK- The e-book boom has reached new heights, but not high enough to boost book sales overall. Helped by millions of Kindles, Nooks and other digital devices given for holiday gifts, e-book sales jumped in January and surpassed purchases of hardcovers and mass-market paperbacks, according to a new survey. The Association of American Publishers reported yesterday that e-sales more than doubled from $32.4 million in January 2010 to $69.9 million in January 2011. Hardcovers sales fell from $55.4 million to $49.1 million, and mass-market paperbacks, a format that's declining as baby boomers seek books with larger print, fell from $56.4 million to $39 million.
LIVING
May 26, 2010 | By Molly Baker FOR THE INQUIRER
'I don't go anywhere without my boyfriend Kindle," says Jen Pechet, a self-professed addict to Amazon's popular e-book reader. She takes it to bed, the dentist's chair, the sidelines of her sons' baseball and lacrosse games, the grocery store parking lot, and the carpool line at school. Pechet was a serious reader before, but the Kindle has upped the ante, luring her to read as many as three books in a single day. Since getting the device in June, she's lined the shelves of her digital library with more than 500 books (that's an average of 41 a month!
NEWS
December 29, 2009 | By Carolyn Davis INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
David Parry, Keith Goldsmith, and Sylvia Ruiz-Tresgallo were pondering the future, each in his or her own way, at the 125th annual meeting of the Modern Language Association this week in Philadelphia. That future is bringing a change from paperbound authorship to online maintenance of a scholar's writing and the discussion that surrounds it. Publishing is increasingly digital. As for the present, it's about praying to the academic gods for employment. Regina B. Oost, chair of the English Department at Wesleyan College in Macon, Ga., described the employment outlook succinctly: "Fewer jobs.
NEWS
June 10, 2008 | By Carlin Romano INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
Is the Kindle about to catch fire? Could Amazon.com's seven-month-old wireless e-book reader - a rectangular wonder in antique iPod white, able to download any of 125,000 books adapted to its format - be the tipping point that marks the decline and fall of the paper book? If those two questions continue to dominate techno-talk in the book-publishing industry, it's because book folk, being weaker in gizmo-related prognostication than, say, the devotees of a consumer electronics show, aren't sure.
NEWS
October 9, 2007 | By Frank Wilson INQUIRER BOOKS EDITOR
In July, when I went on vacation, I decided to take along the essays of Michel de Montaigne - all of them, in a single volume running to 3,271 pages. A heavy and unwieldy choice, right? Not at all. The whole thing fitted nicely into a packet less than half an inch thick and weighing just nine ounces. Welcome to Sony Reader. I downloaded the Montaigne volume from Sony's online e-book store - cost me about $3, if memory serves - but the model of Sony's digital device that I was sent for review already included four other complete books (among them, oddly enough, George Orwell's 1984)
NEWS
February 29, 2004 | By Rosalee Polk Rhodes INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
For those who dread trekking to the library on snowy, rain-soaked or bone-chilling days, the Burlington County Library System is offering a way to borrow books and return them without leaving home. A new e-book service, which debuted Feb. 1, allows library system cardholders to make a few computer clicks and select books from more than 1,000 titles available on the library system's Web site. Gail Sweet, library director, said best-selling novels, children's books, classics, fiction, nonfiction and a few reference books can be downloaded, read, and returned to the library system electronically.
BUSINESS
August 29, 2000 | by Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer Daily News wire services contributed to this report
SOFTWARE GIANT Microsoft Corp. and top on-line retailer Amazon.com Inc. yesterday announced they are teaming up to sell digital books, entering what an industry expert called uncharted terrain. "It's not clear when and how this will pay off," said Peter Fader, professor of marketing at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. "The natural analogy is to look at the music industry, and the difficult time that digital and nondigital firms are having trying to figure out how to manage it. " Under the agreement, Amazon would use a customized version of Microsoft's Reader software for downloading and displaying text on a personal computer or handheld device, the companies said.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|