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E Rate

NEWS
March 13, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Better get that E-ZPass. The Pennsylvania Turnpike's plan for all-electronic tolling envisions a 76 percent surcharge for motorists who don't use E-ZPass devices. That means a trip across Pennsylvania from Ohio to New Jersey that costs $30.17 with E-ZPass would cost $53.10 for a driver who would be billed by mail. The turnpike is moving to do away with all toll booths and instead charge drivers as they pass at highway speed under overhead gantries equipped with electronic readers and cameras.
NEWS
December 13, 1998 | By Gaiutra Bahadur, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For students at the Mary Ethel Costello School, connecting to the Internet is now as fleet as the flash of a cursor on a computer screen. Through the federal Telecommunications Act of 1996, the school has received a discount on Internet connections. Called the e-rate, the discount on telecommunications services is available to all public and private schools, nonprofit organizations and libraries. The amount of the discount depends on the school's economic need. About $2 million in discounts have been awarded to 188 school districts in New Jersey this fall.
BUSINESS
April 23, 1998 | By Martha Woodall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
April 15 was more than the deadline for filing income taxes. It was the D-Day for the E-rate, a federal program that gives schools and libraries reduced rates for telephone and Internet service. Mickey Revenaugh, a spokeswoman for the Schools and Library Corp. (SLC), the nonprofit organization administering the program, said more than 30,000 applications had been received at the processing center in Iowa City, Iowa. She said the total included individual schools and libraries, districts, and mammoth statewide applications.
NEWS
August 20, 1995 | By Susan Weidener, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Most East Whiteland residents would pay higher sewer fees, but about 10 percent would pay less than they do now, under a new rate structure recommended by the township's municipal authority. The head of the authority, Edward Alexander, unveiled the proposal at Monday's supervisors meeting with the statement, "Fairness is the true test of good, equitable government. " The issue of what is fair is at the heart of a controversy here over a sewer rate structure. Some residents pay more than three times as much as others.
NEWS
April 10, 2002 | By Martha Woodall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At a time when city schools are scrounging for every nickel, district officials are nervous because their application for more than $20 million in discounts for technology and Internet service has hit a snag. This year, administrators of a federal program known as the "e-rate" were stumped when they received two sets of applications for discounts for Philadelphia city schools, and they wanted to know why. They have called for a special review and told the district to submit detailed information by next Wednesday.
BUSINESS
May 15, 1997 | By Martha Woodall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Internet service providers and some businesses may be griping about the Federal Communications Commission's landmark ruling last week creating a $2.25 billion fund for reduced telecommunication rates for schools and libraries. But educators were thrilled by the announcement, which they view as the beginning of a long-awaited effort by the federal government to speed the connection of schools to the Internet. At the same time, though, they were left hungry for more information about how the program will help underwrite the costs of wiring their schools to the Internet and tapping its educational resources.
BUSINESS
May 16, 2001 | By Martha Woodall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Attorneys for the federal government and public libraries agreed yesterday that libraries would have until July 2002 to certify that they had adopted Internet filtering technologies before they risked losing federal technology funds. The agreement came during a status conference involving tandem lawsuits filed by the American Library Association and the American Civil Liberties Union in U.S. District Court in March challenging the Children's Internet Protection Act. The law requires schools and libraries to install filtering technology to block pornography and material that is harmful to minors.
BUSINESS
May 8, 1997 | By Rory J. O'Connor, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Consumers moved closer to a new world of lower phone prices and greater competition, as the Federal Communications Commission voted yesterday to cut long-distance charges and set up a multibillion-dollar fund to help provide Internet access in schools. The FCC's decisions are expected to reduce long-distance phone charges by an average of 8 percent while increasing costs of additional home phone lines by $1.50 or more. But the cost of basic phone service is expected to remain unchanged, and years are expected to pass before 63 years of regulation in the phone business is significantly eased.
NEWS
April 1, 2005
Do the math before impugning school architects In recent weeks, articles have painted a dire picture of the New Jersey School Construction Corp. running out of state funds by 2006 - barely halfway to its mandated construction goal. Among the reasons given is that architects on the projects receive almost double the average rate. This statement, by itself, would seem to vilify architects. However, it is incomplete and largely inaccurate. Chief among the inaccuracies is comparing the school projects with other projects.
NEWS
June 17, 1998
Congress has pressured the Federal Communications Commission into breaking a promise to America's schoolchildren. Thousands of needy schools and libraries that can't afford Internet access will be left unconnected - possibly for years - because the FCC has cut funding for a program offering them help going online. Shame on the FCC and Congress for capitulating to corporate bullying. After weeks of intense lobbying by long-distance companies and criticism from Capitol Hill, the FCC voted Friday to curb the program, setting 1998 funding at $1.275 billion - more than 40 percent less than the $2.25 billion originally sought.
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